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6

You have two questions to consider here: Can compounds required for blue atmospheres form in significant amounts on this planet, and are the temperatures right for them to condense and form clouds? I talked about atmospheric composition and color in an answer to a related question. Essentially, the question of whether or not compounds like ammonia and ...


4

Probably not A similar question, Can a planet have a figure-8 type of orbit around two separate stars?, addresses 8-shaped orbits around binary systems, instead of embedded within triple systems. In that question, it was revealed that a non-elliptical orbit can exist between two stars, but it isn't stable. Presumably, life couldn't develop in a two-star "8-...


-2

I would swear that I saw a documentary saying that as soon as a start begins to produce iron, in that cascade of fusing heavier and heavier elements beginning with hydrogen to helium, it immediately goes nova. It also said that authors in Science Fiction have gone through so much trouble to explain killing a star with invented exotic devices, when all they ...


5

Strange matter One single strangelet will do. It could weight as little as a light nucleus (such as that of an carbon or oxygen atom). The thing about strangelets is that everything they interact with also becomes strangelets. This means the sun would be completely converted into strangelets in finite time. For more information, see this video by ...


3

Gamma ray burst: a typical GRB lasts less than a second - a 'long' one lasts several seconds. You can learn more about it here. They're caused by exploding stars, so given that two stars are travelling in exactly the same trajectory to one another - effectively in parallel in 3 dimensional space - a long lasting, focused GRB on your star could kill it - the ...


8

One possibility is called a "Q-ball". A Q-ball is a finite-volume mass of bosons (net-zero-spin particles) theorized to exist by many flavors of string and quantum field theory. The bosons are not bonded to each other by traditional observations of the four fundamental forces, like gravity or electromagnetism, but instead due to a local attractive force ...


3

Drop anti-uranium into it. Assuming that: Antimatter can occur naturally, Matter-antimatter reactions actually do result in complete mass-to-energy conversion (to my knowledge nobody has ever proved this), and The antimatter can get from point A (somewhere outside the solar system) to point B (the sun) without being completely annihilated, then the result ...


5

Assuming neutronium is stable in sub-stellar masses (impossible to verify at this time), a chunk of that material, introduced with enough velocity to promptly penetrate to near the core of the star, then capture into an orbit (via gas drag), would have some significant effects on its hydrogen fusion process and the convection that delivers that energy to the ...


0

Originally posted as a comment to IndigoFenix's answer, but it was moved from this page. @IndigoFenix's "Hide The Moon" option might be improved with this: If the self-replicating nanobots were built with cameras & projection screens. During construction, each nanobot would display what its own camera showed behind it, rendering them invisible to @...


1

How about you play a snooker/pool trick shot instead of doing anything directly? That is, you alter the orbit of something else to collide with the moon, thus altering its orbit (presumably making it wider, so the moon ultimately moves away from and escapes Earths gravity). Finding an object large enough is possible challenging. The asteroid belt has lots ...


2

Hmm, everyone's thinking far too hard... This is inspired by an event mentioned in the Hitchhiker's guide to the galaxy. Simply (well...) disassemble the moon and ship it off to somewhere else. Of course you're going to need a fleet of cargo spacecraft, and some serious amount of diggers to break up the moon and load it onto those spacecraft, bucketload ...


18

You can't move the Moon, it just requires too much energy. But maybe we can deny everyone else the Moon... and ALL OF SPACE!!! Energy Required To Move the Moon out of the Earth's Orbit Let's say "stealing the Moon" means to move it out of Earth's orbit and refusing to put it back until you're paid a ransom. How hard is it to move the Moon out of Earth's ...


56

Plans for stealing the moon. Shrink it Well, this seems like the obvious solution. Just invent a shrink ray, zap the moon so it becomes the size of a basketball, then carry it home with you and mount it as a decoration in your home, a testament to your genius. Problems: Inventing a shrink ray. No science exists that could possibly turn the moon into ...


0

A huge, solar-powered rail- or coil-gun which fires projectiles faster than lunar escape velocity would probably work. Of course this requires that it’s allowed to use the Moon itself for fuel/material. I’m too lazy to look up how much power and material you’d need and how long it would take. Probably a lot. The Moon’s mass is $7.34767309 × 10^{22}$ ...


5

Drill holes in Callisto. Build giant rockets through those holes. If possible, use Callisto's water and pressure to help optimize exhaust. Build a giant laser, powered by Jupiter and/or its moons. Use these to propel Callisto toward the Earth. If fine-tuning this for the desired effect is impossible, throw in another Jovian moon, or just borrow Jupiter via ...


1

Using the orbital mechanics knowledge I acquired from playing kerbal space program, I believe that it is possible to move the moon away using ordinary rocket engines, the problem becomes how to get enough/big enough engines and how to fuel them. I don't know the exact math but the amount of fuel would be astronomical and you wouldn't burn constantly. you ...


7

Harnessing gravitational slingshots (and maybe using lasers to not only deflect, but redirect and control, asteroids) might be a possible solution. If you directed a large enough and fast-moving enough asteroid at the moon, its momentum might make up for its smaller size and knock the moon out of orbit. Given enough asteroids and enough control over them, ...


16

Not enough money, not enough means. To 'steal' the moon you need to disturb its orbit. To disturb its orbit you need a heavy enough mass, at a trajectory and timing precisely to go past the moon to veer it off its orbit. The only kind of mass to pull it off in that time frame is another moon, perhaps one of Jupiters. But then you have the problem of ...


34

It's perfectly easy to steal the moon. Just register a claim on it in every country and start issuing legal notices. It's been done before: Spanish woman claims ownership of the sun


9

It is not feasible to steal the Moon within the next 40 years even with 1 billion dollars+ because we know of no practical means to do such a thing. Removing the Moon from Earth would require astronomical amounts of force and the only way of applying that force would be via an astronomical body such as a large rogue planet or star passing near to the Earth ...


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