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4 votes
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Could a Luna-based colony successfully revolt against Earth?

To answer that, consider first: WHY would Earth have a lunar colony? It could be for exploration, it could to secure humanity's survival in case of Terran WW3, it could be even a cultural-religious ...
Going Durden's user avatar
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1 vote

Could a Luna-based colony successfully revolt against Earth?

I might be slightly confused but a 'revolt' against Earth implies Earth already controls the lunar colonies. If so it has to be through one of three basic means; military occupation - boots on the ...
Mon's user avatar
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-1 votes

Could a Luna-based colony successfully revolt against Earth?

The Moon is a Harsh Mistress is quite an interesting sci-fi novel about the revolution and independence war of a lunar colony. The book has a strong marxist odor, so read with precaution, but anyways ...
Gray Sheep's user avatar
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2 votes

Could a Luna-based colony successfully revolt against Earth?

Ultimately I would expect this to be mutually destructive but Earth would win in the long run. Luna would have little problem wrecking whatever infrastructure on Earth it wanted via kinetic strikes. ...
Sailing Judo's user avatar
1 vote

What is the largest fraction of Earth's sky that an astronomical object could take up (visually) before ripping Earth or itself apart?

One half Since you're not asking for a solid or at least contiguous object, and you explicitly state any, the answer is M31 at its closest; it spans as much as you can imagine, also it has thickness, ...
Vesper's user avatar
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3 votes

What is the largest fraction of Earth's sky that an astronomical object could take up (visually) before ripping Earth or itself apart?

At first thought, the absolute maximum apparent diamater of a companion world in the sky of a habitable world would have to be 180 degrees since if any portion of it appeared to extend more than 90 ...
M. A. Golding's user avatar
28 votes
Accepted

What is the largest fraction of Earth's sky that an astronomical object could take up (visually) before ripping Earth or itself apart?

The calculation turns out to be pretty straightforward and relies on two equations. Say the two objects have masses $M_p$ and $M_s$, with radii $R_p$ and $R_s$, with the $p$ denoting the more massive ...
HDE 226868's user avatar
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