New answers tagged

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Do it like the Keck: Astronomers have a similar issue to you, in that they want high angular resolution but struggle to make large mirrors. Instead, the Keck uses 2 reasonably sized mirrors and cross references them for much greater angular resolution. If you're willing to handwave superhuman image-processing ability, you may be able to reach an effective ...


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You have done well you don't have to change anything as it is believable already. I have tried to model it in https://azgaar.github.io/Fantasy-Map-Generator/ You can download the map from the following link to look through the model I have made. You need to load it from that file into the Fantasy-Map-Generator to view it. https://drive.google.com/file/d/...


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As indicated by AlexP and Kezat's answer, deriving energy directly from water is a matter of hydropower, as it is normally done. Create a reservoir, let Newton do the job. Rain water could have a role in other types of green energy though, like Heat distribution When using excess heat from industry, clean rain water can be put to good use to transport the ...


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Water wheels have been used since the antiquity. The Roman empire made extensive use of water wheels to power mills and industrial equipment. Water wheels work by harnessing the kinetic energy of a stream of water. The stream of water comes from uphill. How did the water get uphill so that it could flow down and power the water wheel? It got uphill by being ...


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Any reason that the same thing we use cant be used? Hydro electric power and dams. This graph shows the world power percentage from hydroelectric power. Note Brazil at 80% from hydroelectric power. According to this wikki brazil gets "between 1,000 and 1,500 mm a year". It also refers to the rainfall as varying wildly, so if you have the very ...


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My female dragons lay clutches of eggs with soft shells. The males fertilize them which triggers the hardening of their multicolored armored shells.


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Remember, magic can transmute matter and energy! Our specially made crystals, when activated, can continually do so. The solution is mindbogglingly simple, within this ruleset. Cast spell "Transmute Gaseous Chlorine to Argon" ENd of answer.


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Sodium Hydroxide Well, what you get out of the reaction depends on whether the $NaOH$ is concentrated or dilute. So the mist would probably include $NaOH$ and plenty of water. Assuming it’s dilute, you would get salt ($NaCl$) and bleach $NaClO_3$. This might be a better, less reactive alternative to elemental sodium. If you have plenty of water, you could ...


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Mathaddict's answers are both good, there is another option that doesn't require selective magic or finely divided carbon that someone may not have the skill to nuance properly, a lump of solid carbon won't help you nearly fast enough after all. Instead use water, lots and lots of water, the first flush of water will be a fine mist, for maximum reactive ...


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Two options The obvious answer is sodium, when this reacts with the chlorine gas, it will make simple table salt. However... sodium does react with other things, so unless the magic can be selective, the reaction between sodium and any water that may also be around would produce hydrogen gas which could result in a deadly fireball. This would be more of a ...


3

Submarine launched missiles have been around since the 1960s. They travel through water from the (submerged) launching sub until they reach air, and then act as normal surface to surface missiles over long distances. If your rocket engines are refuelable, they will be a workable duel environment propulsion system for your needs.


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There are two common methods of airplane propulsion: propellers and jets. These both work in water too. Propellers are far more common in water, but there are water jets too, commonly used in those loud jetskis everybody hates.


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Magnetohydrodynamic propulsion. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Magnetohydrodynamic_drive It is the same principle used in a railgun, but instead of one projectile you continuously shoot the medium you are in. It is contingent on a conductive medium. That means seawater for water, and ionization in the air. These are real, and working models have been built ...


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The orbital period depends on the mass of the parent body as well as the distance. Kepler’s third law tells us that it varies with the square root of the mass, so take the square root of your mass difference of 20 million and you get 4,472. Divide 548 years by that and you should be expecting an orbital period of 0.12 of a year, which is indeed a bit over a ...


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To expand on @lijat's answer: The formula for orbital period is $T = 2 \pi \sqrt{\frac{\alpha ^ 3}{GM}}$ where $\alpha$ is the semi-major axis, $G$ is the gravitational constant, and $M$ is the mass of the more massive body. So while the period of the orbit grows according to the root of the cube of the axis, it also is reduced the greater the mass of the ...


1

I give the advice that I should give to anyone thinking of writing about science fiction shapeshifters, including sceince fiction werewolves. There are a number of implausible shapeshifters in STar Trek. In the animated episode "The Survivor" a Vendorian can not only shift into the forms of other people, he can also become a medical bed and a ...


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Warning: bones may bend when and where you don't want them to, they will be very hard to break though. What you need is a creature that isn't technically human to start with, it would have to have been engineered not evolved because the changes are too drastic and the pay-off is non-existent in a natural selection/survival of the fittest environment. The ...


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We're not shapeshifting, which is cool But you're also asking for a hard-science evolution-oriented justification for a fantasy animal — which isn't as cool. Evolution usually chooses the simplest change that favors continued survival. The really complex aspects of humanity (eyesight, our brain...) are the result of a long series of simple changes, each ...


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You ask for beam spread specifically, but let me point out some other "inherent physical reason[s] why they could not do this". Your (laser or otherwise) beam has to get there. It may get scattered or absorbed by interstellar dust, deflected by gravity (say, a black hole passing by), absorbed by impact against another body (in transit), or stolen ...


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For anyone interested in hard science lasers, my goto refernce is this: http://www.projectrho.com/public_html/rocket/spacegunconvent2.php (Actually the whole site is amazing, although fair warning: Infinite time sink) Ignoring the engineering difficulties, is there any inherent physical reason why they could not do this? Yes Quoting the above site: Laser ...


0

Are we talking about quantum physics, or Einsteinian physics, or real physics? Given a sufficiently long enough time, a sufficiently advanced civilization could do it. However, it would not be a LARGE bust. The idea of light 'fanning out' assumes either a wave theory of light, or that the photons are sent in a 'beam' of many photons' width. Projecting one ...


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O Glorious Leader, Rigel Rigelius R! Allow us of Bespoke Worlds to introduce you to our astounding line of CNC Planetary Modification Devices! As you are undoubtedly aware, Bespoke Worlds has aeons worth of experience in the planetary system design, fabrication, repair, upgrade and removal industries. Our innovative engineers and designers have been meeting ...


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Truly a complex way to do something simple. Your method : Build insanely complex devices to try and control something precisely at least half a galaxy width away. The simple way : Send an order to the locals to build it. Why it's impractical in any way ... Ignoring the engineering difficulties, is there any inherent physical reason why they could not do ...


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There is a way to achieve close to what you want using Nicoll-Dyson Beam This collimated laser beam would not disperse like the usual ray of light and stay highly focused for many light years. The downside is that the width of this laser beam is quite wide, so it won't be possible to carve small details. At the distances exceeding 1 light year, the light ...


0

Face on the full moon I would attempt to do this with moons in tidal lock, always showing the same face to the planet. Maybe some very precise interference pattern could be devised that works on light years distance, but the easiest - and safest - way to yield sharp facial features is sending a robotized high energy laser to orbit the moon. Rather than ...


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There are many reasons. I will list them in no particular order: Lasers (and other similar particle beam weapons) have their power fall off according to the inverse square law. Therefor, the power budget for this thing becomes absolutely absurd from any significant distance. Sure, Kardashev II civilizations might manage things from a few AU away, or even a ...


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Consider it as an addendum for PcMan answer, mostly on economic feasibility. At uni, we did grow E. Coli and in the context of the question, it can be said we had a funny substrate for their happy growth. The substrate was meat soup(sort of, how it was made), we even joked about tasting it, but yeah didn't happen, the thing was like 20 y.o. stuff in the ...


2

You can with current non-research levels of technology. We already have recipes that call for yeast (in quantities beyond just adding texture to bread). See lactation cookie recipes, e.g., https://www.howsweeteats.com/2015/02/lactation-cookies/ . You can purchase bacteria in the same way you can purchase packets of yeast: https://pondperfections.com/product/...


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Yes. A researchgate article about using bacteria (in the form of microbial mats) for food Best of all is, you don't even have to form them into patties yourself, the microbial mats will do the self-organization for you! Here is another example of some Finnish scientists making a tofu-like substance from bacteria. Wiki link for Microbial Mats Sorry for making ...


2

I don't think this will work. At least not in the timeframe stipulated. The human brain compares to the modern computer like this: brain: 1 exaFLOP: (x10^18th) floating point operations per second integrated cellular-scale structures for computing and storage takes less power than a 100 watt light bulb, or 1/5 a humans' metabolic energy adaptive neural ...


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