New answers tagged

7

In the mare magnum of the Internet, one can find anything, literally anything. Well, it looks like someone created also a habitable zone calculator*! The calculator takes as input the luminosity of the star, which you don't give. However you give the estimated masses, thus we can estimate the luminosity of the star using the mass-luminosity relation $L\...


0

I'd mine Phobos and Deimos first. Their total mass is about 20,000 times what you need so it's not hard to expect to find enough iron and carbon in them to make your structure. Plus, you're using local materials so the delivery charge will be minimal :)


1

You mentioned that you wanted the Sun to become some sort of black hole or wormhole that transports the Earth into a different Solar system. Previous answers have talked about how unlikely a random exit into another Solar system. But what if the exit wasn't random because someone else caused the wormhole to form in the first place? Allow me to introduce ...


2

You are looking for the elliptical orbit equations. Specifically, if your wormhole spits earth out at velocity $v$ and radius $r$ away from any gravitationally-massive body of mass $M$ : $v = \sqrt{\mu ({2 \over r} - {1 \over a})}$ Where $\mu = GM$ and $G$ = $6.67 \times 10^{-11} {m^3 \over kg*s^2}$ and $a$ is the semi-major axis (or radius at apogee) ...


-1

Yes, it will, but it would need thousands and millions of years to get to stable orbit and it would unlikely be in habitatable zone (but this is not required, as I undestood). The only condition is - the starting speed should be less then escape velocity for that star. For the Sun it is about 600 km/s near photosphere, 50-30 for inner planets, about 15-7 km/...


5

It's highly unlikely. To orbit a body with a close orbit you need a very specific velocity vector, anything different will either make you hit the body or skip past it. Since you mention that the planet has left the previous system, it will likely have a very high velocity, else it would have been remained bound. Since space is practically empty and the ...


8

Makre your own. The asteroid belt has about 3x1021kg of mass. 10% of the asteroid belt is made up of metallic-stype asteroids. Quite how much actual metal there is in there is hard to say, but lets go for 50%. So that's 1.5x1020kg. You need about .3% carbon in structural steel. About 75% of the belt are carbonaceous-type asteroids. These have a bulk carbon ...


2

The easiest and simplest route of communication is radio Barring that, any form of fluctuation / pattern in the EM spectrum (which includes radio, but also other wavelengths of light such as microwaves). Communication via this means is a simple rod with a current running through it, picked up by an antenna being another rod that you could measure current ...


-2

Quantum entanglement. Assuming radio is not good enough for these impatient people, quantum entanglement is a fun idea. Two quantum particles that are created together become entangled, and any change in spin to one of them changes the spin in the other, instantaneously, at any distance across the universe. This has been real world tested even across two ...


0

To me the best idea seems to be a space station in orbit around the sun, far enough from the planet to avoid signal noise. With a sufficiently active space program possibly more than one -- one between Earth and Mars orbit, four or six in a tetrahedron or octahedron around the sun a hundred AU out, perhaps more. So you have to explain why the observatory ...


1

Space really is the best place to have a telescope, no atmosphere to interfere. A good place in space, would be the Lagrange point L2, as it is always in the earths shadow from the sun, and therefore is less affected by radiation from the sun (here I'm talking about anything emitted from the sun, radiowaves, light etc). Second best place is probably as ...


4

For an observatory that monitors trajectories of objects in the solar system, you want these features: No atmosphere. Atmospheres do horrible stuff to light that needs to be corrected for. Removing scattering gases and dust from the light path makes the telescope much, much less complex to build for the same resulting image quality. Ability to frequently ...


2

If you want to monitor the perimeter of the solar system, the only logical point where you can do this from a single location is close to the center of that perimeter, or in other words the Sun. In this way you will have the entire perimeter at roughly the same distance. As soon as you move closer to another planet you will have a part of the perimeter ...


5

Planetary surfaces are not good spots for observatories. Apart from Mercury, planets in the solar system have atmospheres, and Mercury has even more extreme temperature swings than the Moon. If you need to put your observatory on a large object, an asteroid would be a better choice. The largest asteroid is Ceres, which is also a dwarf planet (diam. 939 km) ...


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