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Recursive star systems like this are tricky I did an analysis in this question about habitable zones within habitable zones and how they interact - the habitable zone concept breaks down from a nice series of circles into something much more complex. It basically gets replaced with a 4d function "how habitable is this spot at this time", and you ...


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This is a great question; I hope I can write a half-decent answer. Some of these points have already been made by others, but I wanted to go into more detail. Atmospheric escape I actually don't think that the atmospheric composition will change significantly, because the solar wind isn't the primary driver of atmospheric escape. Rather, photons - ...


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My guess? Surprisingly little. The lack of a heliosphere would allow a higher galactic cosmic ray flux (about 2-10X depending on the source), but while the possible impact on the cloud cover (and hence on the climate) has long been thought to be a possible solution to the Young Sun paradox, it has recently been determined that this is very likely not the ...


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Most important effects would stem from the lack of a heliosphere The amount of just raw radiation in interstellar space, according to current human observations is about 70 rems per year, while the moon receives about 30 rems per year, so you can assume that the amount of radiation received is going to be around 2.3333333.... times higher than the earth, or ...


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In general, you want to compare some characteristic thermal velocity $v_{\mathrm{th}}$ of a gas molecule with the escape velocity of the planet. There are different choices you can make, all within a factor of 2 or so of each other. I tend to take $$v_{\mathrm{th}}=\sqrt{\frac{3k_BT}{m}}$$ where $k_B$ is Boltzmann's constant, $T$ is the atmospheric ...


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Here are a few notes about your planet and moon. I note that Earth has a mean radius of about 6,371.0 kilometers, while Jupiter has a mean radius of about 69,911 kilometers, which is 10.973316 times the radius of Earth. A radius 11.2 times the radius of Earth would be 1.0206592 times the radius of Jupiter. Planets more than just a little more massive than ...


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Given the information you've provided, there's no way to compute the eccentricity of the orbit; with this setup, it's a free parameter that you can set to whatever you want (although of course we need $e<1$ for a bound orbit). It would be possible to determine if we had some additional information, such as the energy of the planet $E$ and its angular ...


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