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Sky color other than blue

Blue or orange-ish. Probably. We adapt to different illuminants. We see objects that reflect all light in random directions as being 'white' provided there is a reasonable amount of stimulus for our ...
Richard Kirk's user avatar
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2 votes

Is it possible to relocate a planet? Specifically Jupiter

At a high enough civilization energy manipulation level, sure. The problem is that the level required is probably not what you imagine your planet to be at. A K-2 civilization has already harnessed ...
Yakk's user avatar
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5 votes
Accepted

Sky color other than blue

No That hard-science tag is ruthless. There's no room for equivocation. Purple, yellow... such skies cannot exist in a human-habitable context. First of all, you have a problem with how humans ...
JBH's user avatar
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1 vote

Is it possible to relocate a planet? Specifically Jupiter

Plausible: yes. Possible: not in any acceptable time frame After all, an ion engine powered by fusion and floating in Jup's atmosphere could accelerate gas particles fast enough for them to leave Jup'...
Vesper's user avatar
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1 vote

Is it possible to relocate a planet? Specifically Jupiter

Possible: Yes It is possible to relocate planets. Check out the Grand Track Hypothesis, which describes the early history of our solar system in terms of the movements of the Big Planets into and ...
elemtilas's user avatar
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1 vote

Is it possible to relocate a planet? Specifically Jupiter

I used to think that Jupiter's atmosphere would be very flammable because it had so much hydrogen, but it takes oxygen to make that happen. Almost all the oxygen in the solar system (outside the sun ...
Mark Foskey's user avatar
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6 votes

Is it possible to relocate a planet? Specifically Jupiter

The closest thing I could find is Isaac Arthur's youtube video on what is called a "fusion candle". The idea may work when we invent a truly stable and long-lived fusion reactor which can ...
Christmas Snow's user avatar
3 votes

Is it possible to relocate a planet? Specifically Jupiter

It is no plausible for humanity to relocate a planet or even our Moon (let alone Jupiter), to any significant extent at anytime in the foreseeable future and in all likelihood it will never be ...
Slarty's user avatar
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1 vote

Would the equatorial region on an alternative Earth spinning on two axes still be +/- 5° above the median "equator?"

PART DEUX!! Dear Planetary Designer! We have received your clarified specifications and believe that we at Bespoke Worlds can provide a solution for your needs! In fact, our planetary engineering ...
elemtilas's user avatar
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3 votes

Would the equatorial region on an alternative Earth spinning on two axes still be +/- 5° above the median "equator?"

From this alternate Earth you would see the Sun move between the tropics of Cancer and Capricorn then back to its starting point once per day instead of over a year. Just like now, the location of ...
Futoque's user avatar
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3 votes

Would the equatorial region on an alternative Earth spinning on two axes still be +/- 5° above the median "equator?"

If you take a sphere with 0° axial tilt and rotate it along two axes simultaneously, your rotation is identical to the rotation of a sphere with a 45° axial tilt. This would result in the arctic ...
Robert Rapplean's user avatar
1 vote

Could Jupiter-like planet be able to radiate energy to sustain life on satellite?

Planets always form white-hot because of gravitational energy of the protoplanetary matter falling together. Then they slowly cool down by radiaton, big planets like Jupiter can have red hot outside ...
Juraj's user avatar
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5 votes

Would the equatorial region on an alternative Earth spinning on two axes still be +/- 5° above the median "equator?"

PART ONE! We at Bespoke Worlds pride ourselves on offering our clients the widest variety of planets --- habitable as well as downright hostile --- on the market today! We offer planets in every ...
elemtilas's user avatar
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10 votes

Could Jupiter-like planet be able to radiate energy to sustain life on satellite?

Geothermal energy might do it from tidal forces. This can heat up a moon a lot, probably enough to sustain life(just look at the volcanos on Io). Possibly any life might also take advantage of the ...
Bubbles's user avatar
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12 votes

Could Jupiter-like planet be able to radiate energy to sustain life on satellite?

Talking about Jupiter like a failed star can be somewhat misleading. However, it is true that Jupiter radiates more heat than what it receives from the Sun. Based on this paper Jupiter emits around 7....
L.Dutch's user avatar
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1 vote

Flying or swimming in supercritical CO2?

Supercritical carbon dioxide is not terribly dense. You'd have to work pretty hard to flap your wings to stay afloat in it. In this sense moving in SCF is like flying. Similarly, SCF is not very ...
Hugh Perkins's user avatar
-1 votes

Can a cube-shaped(ish) world have uniform(ish) gravity when composed of ideal materials, including antimass?

Something that should be noted: with the appropriate distribution of antimass, you can make your Cubeworld behave (gravitationally) exactly like a spherical planet. The whole reason Cubeworld’s ...
controlgroup's user avatar
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6 votes
Accepted

Can a cube-shaped(ish) world have uniform(ish) gravity when composed of ideal materials, including antimass?

I suspect the answer is yes (for a rounded-edge cube), no anti-mass required, but it is in fact a surprisingly difficult calculation to deal with. You can search up questions about the gravitational ...
Anthony Khodanian's user avatar
1 vote

If the Earth stopped spinning, what's the ideal point for it to stop to ensure the most people survive?

Others have provided good answers as to the best place for the Earth's rotation to stop. I want to expand on that to show that the thin line of survivability might not be as thin as one might assume. ...
Haydentech's user avatar
1 vote

Could a small (15km radius) planet (disregarding physics) have enough material for intelligient life to build on?

I like Escaped dental patient's answer for a maximalist estimate. If instead we're using conventional agriculture, and we assume crops have been specially modified or selected to perform as well as ...
g s's user avatar
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4 votes

Could a small (15km radius) planet (disregarding physics) have enough material for intelligient life to build on?

Yes. The key is preparation and efficiency. To kick-start the colony, take computers, LASER sintering equipment for building, ceramic crucibles, rations, 3D printers (+ 3D LASER-sintering for metals) ...
Escaped dental patient.'s user avatar
2 votes

If the Earth stopped spinning, what's the ideal point for it to stop to ensure the most people survive?

You don't specify what happens to the Moon. At the moment the transfer of momentum from the earth to the moon via tides keeps the orbit from decaying. Although it would take a considerable time, the ...
jrrk's user avatar
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6 votes

Could a small (15km radius) planet (disregarding physics) have enough material for intelligient life to build on?

I think other proposed answers are a bit unimaginative. Of course you can have a 15km radius planet with Earth-identical conditions on the surface. It just needs a small black hole at its core and to ...
Robertiton's user avatar
1 vote

Could a small (15km radius) planet (disregarding physics) have enough material for intelligient life to build on?

No(unless you ignore a lot of physics). The problem is that bodies so small have very weak gravities and almost none of the things needed for sustaining life. It would have no atmosphere, which means ...
Bubbles's user avatar
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0 votes

Could a small (15km radius) planet (disregarding physics) have enough material for intelligient life to build on?

You need some way to provide gravity for them. Natural control mechanisms of our atmosphere mostly won't work. For example, probably there will be no rains, instead a continuous, more vaporous weather....
Gray Sheep's user avatar
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3 votes
Accepted

How would fires turn out in my planet's atmosphere?

This is a weirdly difficult question to answer. The value you're probably interested in is called limiting oxygen concentration. Wikipedia, quoting from "An Introduction to Fire Dynamics" ...
Starfish Prime's user avatar
3 votes

If the Earth stopped spinning, what's the ideal point for it to stop to ensure the most people survive?

Most people would be dead within a few months as food runs out and land can no longer be farmed. However, those with hydroponics and a source of energy could last a while in your given scenario. ...
ChellCPlus's user avatar
6 votes

If the Earth stopped spinning, what's the ideal point for it to stop to ensure the most people survive?

Are we given a heads-up before these superaliens tidally lock our planet? if we're given a couple of years to prepare, along with knowing where the line will be, that affects where the optimal place ...
Anders Martini's user avatar
3 votes

Water distribution on tidally locked planet with small northern ocean

It's a lot more complex than you think But we can simplify it to get to your goal. Imagine, if you will... a billiard ball. This hypothetical billiard ball has an atmosphere and its star is simulated ...
JBH's user avatar
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9 votes

If the Earth stopped spinning, what's the ideal point for it to stop to ensure the most people survive?

More is less The last thing you'd want is to stop with the most people surviving as you'd have a bunch of people and no real way to feed them which would then lead to fighting and starvation. Where ...
Thorne's user avatar
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11 votes
Accepted

If the Earth stopped spinning, what's the ideal point for it to stop to ensure the most people survive?

Here's one way you can try to answer this. I googled "interactive day night map", and while I didn't find exactly what I wanted I did find this one that's fairly close. (The only problem is ...
N. Virgo's user avatar
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1 vote

How would fires turn out in my planet's atmosphere?

Your planet has 4x less oxygen than Earth' Example case, Fire under various oxygen percentages
LazyReader's user avatar
5 votes

If the Earth stopped spinning, what's the ideal point for it to stop to ensure the most people survive?

I'm no astrophysicist, but as I understand it, no matter where rotation stopped everyone would die. Not necessarily instantly, but every system in everything, both natural and human made, was with the ...
Nerd of games and books's user avatar
12 votes

If the Earth stopped spinning, what's the ideal point for it to stop to ensure the most people survive?

You scenario doesn't work out as you hope. The terminator is a narrow stripe, and even if it doesn't get too hot or too cold, it will be impossible for this narrow stripe to sustain the life of those ...
L.Dutch's user avatar
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5 votes

The "Face" in Cydonia, Mars

Consider similar phenomena on Earth. On the one hand we have Mount Rushmore, https://www.nps.gov/moru/index.htm, which we know is an artificial construct, deliberately carved by human beings to look ...
Jay's user avatar
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11 votes
Accepted

The "Face" in Cydonia, Mars

An artificial construct could be either built up, like the pyramids in Egypt, or it could be cut from the rock. If it is the former, disguise will be all but impossible. Consider Stonehenge, nobody ...
o.m.'s user avatar
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2 votes

Would a planet whose sun is always in one place have weather?

Not quite what you're describing, but a tidally locked planet rotates at the same rate it orbits its star, so the sun never moves in the sky. Such a planet would definitely have weather, and it would ...
talrnu's user avatar
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4 votes

Would a planet whose sun is always in one place have weather?

sun is described as being permanently moved above its North Pole. what you are describing is physically impossible. It is possible to have the sun fixed at a position in the sky. Those who have ...
L.Dutch's user avatar
  • 289k
3 votes

Could a biological organism power itself with electricity like a smartphone (or something similar)?

I believe the primary issue is that some form of non energy nutrient is still needed. A typical creature has physical structure, comprised of various cells, maintained and allowed to grow by nutrients ...
Nerd of games and books's user avatar
6 votes

Color for this sky

Impossible A 4atm atmosphere with about 20% ammonia makes about 0.8 bar partial ammonia pressure. However, ammonia is liquid at 225K, and its saturated vapor pressure is far below that (about 0.4 bar)....
Gray Sheep's user avatar
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8 votes
Accepted

Color for this sky

Brown: (The surface of Titan, as taken by the Huygens probe, image credit ESA/NASA/JPL/University of Arizona via wikimedia The key thing here is the formation of tholins from atmospheric methane ...
Starfish Prime's user avatar
8 votes

Color for this sky

Based on the data provided and the star type, you can infer the color of the sky using the following ideas: Rayleigh Scattering: With nitrogen constituting 64% of the atmosphere, it scatters blue ...
cconsta1's user avatar
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