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4

Given unrealistic premises, any consequence can be possible. To begin with, you cannot 3D print energy and raw materials. Those have to come from somewhere. And for them to come you need to supply something in exchange. That something is usually money. You cannot 3D print money, for the same reason any half decent central bank doesn't want to print money ...


1

Aside from increasing the salinity, you may play with some additional concepts. Even on earth there exists something called Antifreeze proteins that allow some fish to exist below the freezing temperature of Earth's ocean (about –1.9 °C) without increasing salinity of their bodies. In fact, the salinity balancing in vertebrates is a rater complex subject. ...


0

Source At roughly 29-30% salinity, the lowest freezing point is -21.1C. This is called a eutectic point: The point at which a certain ratio of two different materials gives a freezing point which is lower than freezing point of each material on its own. Just check that this freezing point matches your climate.


0

Can it support life? Provided liquid water and a strong enough magnetic field is present, the likelihood of such a planet being able to support some sort of flora and fauna is quite high. In the end it depends on the characteristics of the star(s), though. The black hole does make it a challenge, though,because of the various forms of radiation that these ...


5

I can see four key problems with the system as you've described it: Giant planets. The major thing that concerns me about the system is the presence of at least two gas giants. It's long been thought that low-mass stars like red dwarfs are unable to form giant planets, because the stars' protoplanetary disks are generally low-mass, and there's simply not ...


2

Let me turn the question around. A large fraction of humans (maybe even a vast majority) believe humans didn't originate on this planet, despite the fact that we have very solid evidence that we did indeed evolve on Earth. Some don't even reject evolution and still somehow believe they believe that. Many creation myths involve humans coming from a different ...


1

The problem is going to be to make them lose some technology, but not so much as to prevent them from surviving. Mesolithic people had their own technology that was very effective for small hunter-gatherer populations. They knew how to make tools and hunting weapons using local resources. They knew which parts of which plants were edible, and which could be ...


2

They choose not to use their technology Given that your story starts with humanity's reckless use of technology destroying a planet, I could easily imagine a new colony making a deliberate decision to regress to pre-electric technology levels, or even further. Give it a generation or two for the old education levels to wane and you have your technological ...


1

I feel that the premises of your question are somewhat unrealistic. Firstly, radiation fades very quickly. https://emilms.fema.gov/IS3/FEMA_IS/is03/REM0504050.htm In that source, it says "for every 7-fold increase in time after detonation, there is a 10-fold decrease in the exposure rate." In a few weeks or months after the detonations, survivors will be ...


1

Geomagnetic Storm If the planet where they settle down is in a similar solar system as our planet, then a geomagnetic storm is a way to make them lose all of their electronics in a short time. If you check this article you can learn more about it, but according to it says: A geomagnetic storm on the scale of the solar storm of 1859 today would cause ...


1

Only the kids survive. The adults die within the year after arriving on the new planet. Just as adults who catch measles can become terribly ill but kids shake it off, the adults fall victim to disease organisms endemic to the new worlds while the kids roll with it and emerge from infection scarred but intact. The little kids who are the main survivors ...


2

You asked "Is there any way to calculate it?". The answer is yes, but it's not going to be as simple as plugging a few numbers into a simple formula. You'll need a general circulation model. The reason is that the heat transport around the planet involves the atmosphere and the oceans, and these require dealing with fluid dynamics. This is going to bring ...


2

Shame The colonists left their home for a reason. Their old home may have been perfectly good, but they disapproved of it. Perhaps their religion wasn't widely accepted, despite their insistence that it was the one true way to live. Perhaps they remembered a time when they had a just government, and now they've had decades of corrupt ones. Whatever the ...


3

Your premise already explains it. and those who survived were dispersed on a few dozen smaller ships that scattered themselves throughout this new galaxy, with each eventually finding and settling their own uninhabited new world. The large knowledge databanks, the educational material etc., would have been in the mothership alone, of course. The smaller ...


0

The Aphasia Plague Some ideas were extremely difficult to discover, but are so simple to explain that they are very unlikely to be lost. The ideas behind the germ theory of disease, for example. Or the knowledge that metal exists, and can be made by heating the right kind of rock to a very high temperature. Or that food can be preserved by adding lots of ...


2

The people who survived aren't useful to keeping tech running. In the Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy series, the people who crash landed on earth were not...exactly pioneer material. They were mainly middle management. If the majority of people who went down were ordinary citizens, most would not have any technical expertise, let alone be able to figure ...


5

It would be unbelievable if they had kept their technology after several unplanned and under-equipped diasporas. Advanced technology is not just a bunch of technical lesson plans which can be casually carried along in every ship's computer. It is also the undocumented wisdom of experienced practitioners in hundreds of distinct disciplines. Beyond that, ...


8

No tools to build tools. The surviving ships had a limited supply of spare parts and no means to make more. Once the capacitor on the ciruit board of the 3D printer goes bad, that thing is completely useless. Perhaps the engineers realized that, and tried to 3D-print old-fashioned turret lathes and printing presses with the starship workshops. But then ...


1

Pandemic Episode of Lost Syndrome This small group of colonists chose a wonderful planet that was very similar to their home planet. The new planet, however, contained a very particular niche apple tree that could grow only in the one grove the colonists settled near. Because it is so geographically restricted, that tree had developed an extreme defense ...


1

I think readers will believe this - the idea of a society that has forgotten its true origins is actually not uncommon. Two examples of similar forgettings are Heinlein's Orphans of the Sky and Hal Clement's The Nitrogen Fix. Both stories happen after a societal collapse and the loss of literacy. However, I would actually argue that this kind of forgetting ...


3

Survival. they suddenly lost all communication to people outside the planet and they will have to live without it. What possible reasons why they will actually forget that they did not originate on that planet? The loss of communication generated despondency, panic, despair. Some people realized that this "orphan complex" might stump the planet's ...


2

Is time on the storyteller’s side? My main thought is to compare the question to real history. Setting aside the question of human origins itself, the largest disconnect in human history would be the human migration to North and South America. It is generally agreed that the migration took place across the exposed sea floor from NE Asia to NW America. ...


3

The knowledge has been systematically erased from every kind of database, over many generations, to create a kind of societal control. This has happened over so long a period of time and so thoroughly that even the people who did the erasing now believe their own lies. In fact that false history is now the only accepted history. There's not even a shred of ...


6

There had been many attempts at colonization of other worlds. All of them failed. As it turned out, the settlers just couldn't cope with the traumatic stress of being separated from the home world by incomprehensible cosmic distances, and living under a strange, subtly wrong sun. For this reason, a new colonization program was started, where the settlers ...


3

Politics. Humans are seen as invaders who do not belong here. It is necessary to change this view to stress that we belong here, we have always been here, this is our home. Any suggestion otherwise gets dumps in the memory hole. Otherwise your humans have no legitimacy and big problems with justifying why they occupy a chunk of the planet...


7

A Fresh Start + Propaganda The planet was settled by some (take your pick) Religious Fanatics/Idealistic Utopians/Persecuted Cult/Tyrannical Government/Other Group that wanted to cut all ties to old earth to Get Away From the Heretics/Create Plato's Republic/Escape Persecution/Form the Perfect World Order. The entire crew of the ship has agreed to keep the ...


2

Some sort of chemical in the atmosphere that interferes with long-term memory? This could either be a gas (say low levels of chloroform or similar) that interferes with memory formation, or a radiation effect - either permanent, or perhaps from a crash landing on the planet? - that actually directly modifies the body's epigenetic configuration and switches ...


32

Time This is normally done with the application of a few hundred years, technological collapse and a migration of the population away from any physical artifacts of interplanetary travel. Technological collapse takes away all their records, even if they reinvent computers later they probably won't be able to read the old records. The technological collapse ...


2

A charismatic fanatic. Give them a leader with very strong ideals, and instead of making him evil and destructive give him personality traits that would make it easy to follow. Strong, smart, fair, self-aware, humourus, and able to take and keep control over the majority of people. And his mind is set strong on that his way is the right way and the only way....


41

Religion Some book considered holy and written long ago claims some deity created that specific planet, and then all sorts of creatures and finally humans on it. So the inhabitants of Eden think they have been expelled from the Garden of Earth, without ever realising that Earth is another planet.


7

Civilization collapse. Societal collapse triggers a drastic reduction is specialists which triggers a loss of knowledge. It has happened in the past, (the bronze age collapse), and a lot gets lost during collapses. There is evidence many bronze age societies lost writing, which is pretty big loss. Now oral tradition may preserve some knowledge they will ...


28

It only takes a generation or two before that which may once have seemed foreign may then be seen as something that was always there. For example, in our daily lives, we don't think about how certain food items aren't native to our current homes, yet mere centuries ago, pineapples were a luxury. We take things for granted, and that's something that can ...


2

Just put everything underwater No dry land, no metal, no electricity. Fits the stated criteria to a T. Unfortunately, I'd suppose the asker was imagining something more ... Earth-like, except no electricity. Ah well. In that case... Just put everything underwater You can have plenty of water in the environment. As long as the prevalent phase is gaseous, ...


1

The intelligent species reigns above all life on the planet. But what about off of it? May I present to you an age old Sci-fi trope: The caretaker satellites Essentially you have a satellite constellation (or a species of more advanced watchers) in orbit. These satellites are self sustaining, damn near sentient, can replenish whatever supplies they need ...


1

Does the entire surface of the planet need to be desert, or just most of it? If your world with a shallow ocean experienced some form of massive, sudden continental shift that then formed one very deep ocean, in theory all of the water could over time evaporate from the shallow ocean and rain over the deep one. Of course there'd be some redistribution, but ...


1

No you can't. You see, your "intelligent species" are bio-electronic devices. Any influence interfering with normally functioning electronics, would also prevent nerves to work (E.M.P. (ElectroMagnetic Pulses) are not safe for humans!). If we are talking about a society that is unable to develop computers (or most electonics tech in general), but that have ...


0

If for some reason you have a lot of alkali metals or alkaline earth metals (maybe underground deposits that at some moment get in contact with the water), water will react with them to form a hydroxide and H2, which in turn can escape from the planet. You will need a lot of them, though.


9

Answer is very simple: Glacial Period. Most of the water would be captured in polar glacials, while at equator it would be very dry, extremly hot at daytime desert. There were such a situation on Earth during (last) glacial period (our oceans are to deep to dry out, but some water bodies did). UPD: There still be rivers flow from glacials wich will bring ...


3

Earth has a lot of water because it is made from the remains of old stars that spit out tons of Oxygen and Hydrogen. If your planet is in a star cluster where none of the right stars have ever exploded for there to be much Oxygen, there would not be water in it's makeup. So at first, your planet is just a boring, dry as a bone world. Then one day it ...


0

I don't think that you can get rid of the water without getting rid of the atmosphere. You just need a mechanism to replace the atmosphere. Hit it with a big enough rock. Theoretically Earth was an ocean world before it was hit by a rogue planet about the size of Mars. A lot of the lighter stuff was blown out at or above escape velocity. So that blew ...


2

One option would be to have an huge geological formation that formed a completely closed bowl with mountains on all sides a little like the ring of fire but on a smaller scale perhaps a few hundred - a thousand miles across. This could be in a remote but wet area. Over time this area would fill up with rain water to form a very deep wide inland sea and the ...


3

Sure, sort of. It's hypothesised Nikola Tesla's "wireless free energy" idea may have inadvertently done something like this, where it would power super-simple electronics like light bulbs, but complex electronics like circuitry that need delicate operations would just be fried; If the idea had spread around the world in the manner the internet did, without ...


5

This depends a lot on why electric or electronic devices don't work or can't be developed. The fundamental principles of electricity tie deeply into the other foundations of physics (it's tempting to try and say "there is no electromagnetism so you can't make generators", for instance, but if you get rid of magnetism then you also get rid of light, which ...


10

I do not believe that any form of EMP would prevent electrical technology, as the EMP would induce currents in metals which might attract attention and at some point metal screens would be discovered. But there is one possible way that does not use EMP. If all of the common metals accessible by smelting such as iron, copper, zinc, lead, nickel etc were ...


1

Standard stars forms from the collapse of hydrogen nebulas. The nebula self-gravity concentrates matter in the center. Friction eventually generate enough pressure to start a nuclear fusion process and the star ignites. What if we have a nebula made with air? Let's assume that it is spheric and have 1 astronomic unit radius (i.e. $1.5 \times 10^{11}\,\text{...


0

In Cosmos, Carl Sagan wrote about the possibility of life on Jupiter, imagining it as huge, floating organisms called "floaters" that feed upon smaller "sky plankton" he called "sinkers." And as a 2016 research paper argues, the idea wasn't totally crazy, though the smaller organisms seem far more likely to exist. Sagan also wrote about how even Venus's ...


13

Could a star exist with this cloud similar to earth atmosphere around it where a person could breathe without much effort? Nope. The solar wind and radiation pressure and a combination of planetary and stellar gravity would either blow away or hoover up all the gas cloud in relatively short order. That's why there's a fairly hard vacuum between planets in ...


7

No to the star, Yes to the travel A star cannot exist in that type of atmosphere for many reasons. Not the least of which is heat. Temperatures range into the millions of degrees, which destroys any chance of a stable atmosphere. Furthermore, any particles in the air would result in continual dust explosions. This of course does not mention issues with ...


4

Gases Gas, Color - Helium: White to Orange; under some conditions may be Gray, Blue, or Greenish-blue. - Neon: Reddish-orange - Argon: Violet to Pale Lavender Blue - Krypton: Gray, Off-White to Green. At high peak currents, bright Bluish-white. - Xenon: Gray or Bluish-gray, dim White. At high peak currents, very bright Greenish-blue. - ...


1

While there would be specific methods used depending on the ore and nature of the environment, I'm going to assume there is a high tech society or entity actually doing the mining (a sort of space mining operation), which can be applicable to almost any environment. A source of high intensity heat energy is needed, such as a large solar mirror or electric ...


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