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7

In the mare magnum of the Internet, one can find anything, literally anything. Well, it looks like someone created also a habitable zone calculator*! The calculator takes as input the luminosity of the star, which you don't give. However you give the estimated masses, thus we can estimate the luminosity of the star using the mass-luminosity relation $L\...


17

Some simple molecules can exist in stars - but not the right ones. Contrary to popular belief, many different types of molecules can exist in stellar atmospheres, especially cool stars like red dwarfs. Some are even helpful spectral diagnostics; TiO bands are very common in stars cooler than 4000 K, which actually encompasses most of the stars in the ...


5

Plasma is made by a soup of atomic nuclei and loose electrons. As such no molecules exist in a plasma. Life is based on (complex) molecules, therefore no life can exist in a plasma like the one present in stars. It's like trying to make a castle of cards in the middle of an hurricane.


1

TL;DR: The actual single question I'm asking to people here is; how far away do you have to go before one of these moons is habitable? Your moons at 4 and 8 million km might be ok. I'm sure you can handwave that. The inner moons are more doubful due to radiation and tidal stresses, but water worlds might be habitable for aquatic species. Do Cyan and ...


1

There are many previous questions with answers about possible habitable moons of gas giant planets (or sometimes brown dwarfs) in the habitable zones of stars. Here is a link to apparently 667 posts on that topic: https://worldbuilding.stackexchange.com/search?q=Habitable+moons1 And I think that someone interested in the habitability of exomoons, moons of ...


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