New answers tagged

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It looks like it would depend on the particular plate armor. The tricky stat to find is how thick of steel you need to stop a bullet. The kind of people who are interested in stopping bullets are the kind of people who are willing to make it just a bit thicker. You know, just in case. I found lots of people who would vouch for stopping a 9mm or .45 with 1/...


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There are many problems There has to be decomposers. If there are consumers on land, there will be consumers that figure out they can eat dead things, which do not fight back as much. If they can digest living organisms they can digest dead ones. Also stomach acid is produced to kill bacteria, if it does not do this is is useless. It can't do this if it is ...


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animals themselves in general need a certain amount of acid in the water they drink, as their bodies do not produce stomach acid on their own. This acid assists in the breakdown of food in the stomach and is therefore absolutely necessary for the digestive process. I think here is a flaw. If animals and plants are able to live in an environment with acid ...


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As the other answers point out, it's not very plausible that cutting one's self could cause this kind of symptom. At least not on it's own, but you might consider adding in some other factor(s). One idea could be that the character had a latent neurological condition that affects his face muscles in this way but it requires a specific pain stimulus to ...


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You describe an absence seizure. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Absence_seizure The hallmark of the absence seizures is abrupt and sudden-onset impairment of consciousness, interruption of ongoing activities, a blank stare, possibly a brief upward rotation of the eyes. If the patient is speaking, speech is slowed or interrupted; if walking, they stand ...


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Nerve damage due to a physical injury is not intermittent as described in the question. What can be intermittent is a psychological issue that might be related to either the self-inflicted injury itself, or the situation that led the character to cut his own face. Rather than nerve damage (and in fact, he might well have nerve damage, but it would be much ...


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As someone who has had facial nerve paralysis. Not like you've described. Facial nerves are grouped together, so tend to seize up and become restored in groups. The neck, shoulders, and jaw muscles are routed through an entirely different path to those controlling facial expressions. If he damages that nerve on one side, he'll get Bell's Palsy. I had a ...


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It highly depends You don't give enough insight into what exactly we want. In theory, any vessel that can leave the solar system can reach Proxima. It will just take a metric ton of time. Furthermore, how big is the vessel anyways Is it suppose to make a fly by or shall it also do something there ? Lets assume this: The Vessel should reach Proxima in 25 ...


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There is lots to do in a virtual world: Creativity. Give me a life of luxury, and I'm going to start building things out of boredom. You will have people creating things: Arts: Book authors. As well as composers, musicians, screenwriters, actors, conductors, directors, etc. Engineering: People will build things. You'll have software engineers building ...


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Related: How to monetize uploaded consciousness? A virtual world is necessarily a post-scarcity world. If you can materialize a corvette out of thin air through a console command, industry is a thing of the past. And if your real body is taken care by robots like that, healthcare for the body is also mostly something of the past. That leaves: Security ...


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Tiny, cm sized probes, accelerated by lasers It's called Breakthrough Starshot, and it's a method of getting a probe to Proxima Centuri in 20 to 30 years, with a 4 year allowance for data reply. Did you mean manned? We could totally attempt a one-way generation ship if properly motivated, yet 100% odds we wont. If an inspirational leader (JFK-like) were to ...


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"Work" provides more than an economic trade. It's also fills many human needs: For many folks a stable routine and corresponding feeling of security, a set of constrained-yet-fulfilling social interactions, and a source of status and self-worth. Virtual activities, whatever they are called and whether they pay or not, must fill many of the same ...


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The propulsion system will be chemical rocket engines. The ship will also use gravitational slingshot assists to gain its maximum velocity of fifteen (15) kilometres per second. This is the space technology as it exists today in 2020. The human species has been able to employ space technology to do exactly this since the 1970s. It is unlikely to change in ...


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I'm not sure what "work" a human would do in a simulation that they wouldn't do in real life - or, why they would do work at all. If a society has the resources to make a whole virtual world, then it would be trivial to make all tasks performed by your NPCs, meaning that people would only need to do things they want to do. However, there are some ...


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Jousting armor It protected it's wearer from the lanсe with total wight/energy of enemy, his armor, his horse combined. Total energy on the tip if the lance is at the order of sniper or antimaterial bullet - far greater than for pistol one. And this protection was quite reliable - deths were not that common on medieval joustings. Most clashes brought no harm ...


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Method 1: Presuming you have a 7 round Colt, the technology you need is 8 fellow knights on horseback armed with just about anything heavy. If these charge at the gunman, whilst it's theoretically possible that he/she could shoot sufficiently accurately and quickly to kill 7 of them from the point they get in range, I would doubt it is possible to reload to ...


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Most likely, yes .45 acp is a fairly low velocity round that doesn't need a huge amount of steel to stop it. Assuming hardened steel is being used for the armor. The breastplate is the toughest part of the armor and has a chance to deflect the round as well. Plus, once the threat is realized, they can just make thicker breastplates and be pretty certain a ....


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It would be a hard undertaking in the 14th century. Firearms were just introduced in Europe, and neither gunsmiths or armor makers had yet a lot of time to improve their work. As such a "bullet proof" armor did not yet exists. After the introduction of firearms in Europe, there was an arms race between gunsmiths, making ever more deadly guns, and ...


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Depending on ammunition, you M1911 is not much different to a crossbow except that it does not hit as hard, or penetrate as well, and has shorter range. Better rate of fire, of course. Consider a mounted knight with a shield and lance charging at a man on foot with a .45. Which would you rather be? A cool-headed man with a .45 and good aim might win, ...


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Medieval armor was intended to offer almost full protection against bladed weapons, partial protection against lances, arrows and cross bow bolts, and a little bit of protection against blunt force weapons. It didn't do any good against heavy projectiles, against cannon or against direct hits by arquebus balls. Most types of modern body armor, such as those ...


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Back when firearms were introduced on the battlefield, armorers started to produce musket-proofed armor. This caused a little arms race, which the musket ultimately won, but better armor helped at first. This article has some penetration figures, with modern pistols and rifles for comparison. A modern pistol, with the smaller and lighter bullet, is ...


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There was an era during which trees would mostly not decompose. It was the Carboniferous. The wikipedia article for it says: The large coal deposits of the Carboniferous may owe their existence primarily to two factors. The first of these is the appearance of wood tissue and bark-bearing trees. The evolution of the wood fiber lignin and the bark-sealing, ...


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I'm going to make a frame challenge here: What exactly separates a decomposer from a micro-organism that simply needs to eat something? Without decomposers on land, you would not need a fridge since food would not decay. But food is food and if there are micro-organisms they are going to want to consume that food thereby decomposing it. The conclusion is ...


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It would be very weird. Corpses wouldn't rot, trees wouldn't rot. to name a few consequences: Forest fires would become very deadly since trees don't decompose, so fires would burn many, many more trees, and have much more fuel. They would be harder to stop. Bodies won't decompose This would have many negative consequences: People could hide bodies in any ...


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Of course your rabies plague wouldn't wipe out half the European population in three short years. You yourself said rabies has been around "all the way back to 2000 BC". If rabies could have wiped half of anything in three - or 300 or 3,000 - years, there would never have been an AD… we'd have been exterminated long before BC ran out.


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Very advanced Consider a civilisation that discovers something so terrible that they choose voluntary extinction to ensure that any future civilisation is not exposed to it. In doing so they go to considerable efforts to hide any trace that they ever existed; even things that we haven’t so far thought to look for.


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The Implausible Physics Amateur Scenario Building Advanced Technology that is Super-Inconsistent There are real life examples of advanced technology that was nonreplicable, but I mostly think of John Hutchison. John Hutchison is what you could think of as a notorious amateur. He experimented on his own, did not take notes on what he was doing, was working ...


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Even human civilization as it is now might be completely lost in deep time. A lot of people might think of fossils as unavoidable evidence for past species/civilizations. One thing that is not generally realized is how exceedingly rare fossils are. To quote Bill Bryson in "A Brief History of Time", Chapter 21: Only about one bone in a billion, it ...


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Powersuits are superyachts Take a cue from Batman. Make power armor wildly expensive. $1.9 billion, like the world’s most expensive yacht, should do it. Make it highly custom fitted to the individual. Now, the only people who have powersuits are people who: Are obscenely wealthy Desire to waste their wealth ostentatiously Are young enough to go galavanting ...


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An existing O'Neill Station or a custom-built one? A spin gravity habitat puts stress on the hull. In a simple, non-spining station, the mass/inertia of objects is only noticeable if you want to move them relative to the station. In a spin habitat, centrifugal force pushes objects on the inner surface against the surface. Lots of water is heavy. Lifting ...


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Oceans? No. O'Neill cylinders max out around 1600 km$^3$ (radius of 4 km, length of 32 km as per the original design). That is less than the volume of Lake Ontario, and almost certainly exceeds the structural limits. A McKendree cylinder on the other hand has a theoretical maximum volume around 8,000,000,000 km$^3$, almost six times the volume of all the ...


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Several theoretically possible ideas come to mind: Counter projection. A powerful computer and camera system 3d scans the surroundings live and tracks where every person within range is currently looking. Additionally, the cloaked person is wearing an ultra-black bodysuit so that they'd appear as a dark blotch to peoples vision. Then, a complex laser ...


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It depends if you whether stick to with a definition of 'invisibility' where light either passes through the object (transparency) or is bent around the object . In terms of your question to date there is no way for organic matter to be made transparent (or indeed most other forms of condensed/cold matter either). In terms of deflecting light around a target ...


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Keeping them on the primitive scale you picture could work with no known evidence of their having "achieved" that. Consider all the things above about physical evidence, then consider that we might not even realize evidence existed. That doesn't apply to troodons, I suppose, but consider anything a fair deal larger would have houses, for example, ...


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The absence of proof of a dinosaur civilization is not proof of absence. We can look to our own civilization as our technology evolves. In our earliest artifacts, function dominates form. Ancient arrowheads are easily recognized even though the cultures that made them are distant memories, whose only existence is often only told by the same stone ...


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As described, your dragon is good for armed reconnaissance The 40mm grenade launcher is hardly artillery, and hardly a bomb, but it can produce smoke or shrapnel rounds at needed, and modest airborne fires. I'd compare it favorably to the 2.75 inch Hydra rocket(Which now has the APKWS kit that offers laser guidance), though it's not quite as good as that. ...


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Take the grenade launcher with AI targeting, forget the dragon. It's big and vulnerable. A few of those launchers on portable mounts would be highly effective. Use the dragons to emplace them and get out of the area if you're looking for a job for them.


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"Primitive" is a loaded term, which is why it would not be used by a modern athropologist. Let's consider, rather, an extremely advanced society, one far in advance of current humanity. They live in peace, with no crime, poverty or disease. They live in harmony with nature, with no need for technology. (Perhaps they do it all via spiritual strength ...


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I think the use case for these dragons is wrong. I wouldn't see them as cheap air support but as mobile fire support. They sounds to me like a biological weapons carrier platform. See the British universal carrier or the Wiesel. Not a vehicle type that is widely used currently, but with added flying abilities, probably easier maintenance and lighter ...


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Saurian Sapiens (to give them a semi-sciencey name) evolved in what would later become modern Africa from a creature similar to Troodon Unlike humans, they never left their cradle continent to spread across the world. Their metabolisms and tolerance for different environments is significantly lower than that of humans. Consequence of their smaller body-mass ...


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They need to be Pre-glassblowing Time is the big issue, very few things can survive tens of millions of years, metals and organic materials breakdown, stone tools become degraded, even pottery suffers water damage. Fossils from that long ago are never completely intact even well preserved material suffer cracking and chemical degradation. As long as the ...


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Many tribal societies today will have no archaeological record in a thousand years, much less millions of years We don't really know how far back our own civilization goes because evidence of early man is so degraded and hard to interpret. There are many primitive technologies that we only know about because modern tribal societies make them, but they have ...


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It would be as virulent as it is today. By that I mean that the spread rate would be proportional to human population. The main issue would be spreading. We could assume that each household had a dog that could catch rabies. The problem is how to spread it. The dogs were expected to be aggressive and bite everyone. They were released from chain for the night ...


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A rabid dog is something that a good wall can deal with. Or a well-thrown rock. Not to mention that the danger was obvious. Fleas were a lot harder to exterminate, even if you realized that they were the problem. (Note that exterminating rats is also somewhat harder AND leads to fleas leaping to humans as new habitat. People have learned that you deal ...


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Human armies have access to a small number of jet fighters and tanks Both sides have access to modern technology how should this dragon go about driving humans out of her territory? Short answer. She can't. I will offer solutions down after that. we currently have fun things such as ICBM. Fighter jets that can easily push a top speed of 3 km/h. Source. ...


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Human Blindness and Scientific assumptions: Every so often, people find strange bits of metal and ceramic-like material in stones. Odd regular shapes turn up in long, strung-out geological arrangements like roads. Jewel-like stone shells can be found in museums around the world - they're beautiful, if you care to go the the Smithsonian and take a look. Does ...


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More advanced than ours. After industrialisation caused CO2 levels to rise from 1200 to 2500 ppm at the end of the Jurassic, the Silurians invested in all manner of technologies to remove all Sauroprogenic effects on the environment, nanotech removing all trace of previous industrialisation and only using materials which biodegraded completely in a few ...


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Greenpeace. Since, by your own admission, dragons aren't especially common, your dragon could lobby to establish herself as an endangered species. By law, you can't develop land which is an endangered species habitat. She'd have to put up with the occasional National Geographic documentary, but otherwise she'd be left alone. However, that doesn't harm any ...


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There is a vineyard in Chile called Concha Y Toro. They have this awesome red wine called Casillero del Diablo. Translating to English, that's "The Devil's Locker". In the late 1800's people were stealing aging bottles from the storage. Legend has it that the vineyard owner made a pact with the devil, so Satan was there in person to make sure no ...


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Everything Leaves Behind Evidence It would have to be so primitive that calling it a "civilization" wouldn't be accurate. They can't have tools. Those show up in fossil records. They can't have written language or art. That would show up on rocks and in caves. They can't have burial rites. Archaeologists would find graves. They can't have ...


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