New answers tagged

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I think unless the disk isn’t synchronized with the planet and the planet with the sun it will be similar the the moon. But 1) You disk doesn’t let any light through. This means you have 2+1 option to how this thing will behave a) the disk is a black body and while not letting any light through it absorbs everything and emits it as heat radiation (look up ...


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Nothing, sun still hits the spot anyway. If the disk is locked with the rotation of the Earth, it only blocks the Sun when it's between the Sun and the point on Earth it's over. For the entirety of the rest of the day, that area will still get sunlight. Spot will still get sunrise, and sunset, it'll just have a solar eclipse every day at noon.


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Apart from flying in a more equilibrium-like state, as was discussed in another answer, I would like to think that the Pegasus would use its legs to keep balance and centre of mass. Sort of similar like what you do as a human when you're trying to balance, you wave your arms around in circular motions. Otherwise trying to reduce drag as much as possible. ...


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To achieve flight, all you need is force equal or opposite to the force that is causing you to fall. This could manifest itself as a vertical vector which have enough force to life however heavy you are as a human. (This is why swimming in water is possible - water's greater resistance reduces your weight and gives your movement more power.) By shifting this ...


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Electrostatic maneuvering jets. Your character can generate very high voltages, and use these to accelerate atmospheric gas ions away from himself. He is an electrostatic nuclear accelerator An electrostatic nuclear accelerator is one of the two main types of particle accelerators, where charged particles can be accelerated by subjection to a ...


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I am no geologist or weather expert but I think that if it's over an area that has water, then there might be less evaporation and thus less rain clouds at some times? Obviously not if it's over the ocean but only in that specific area maybe. Otherwise I don't think it would hav etoo much of an impact on the weather? Proabably more on the plants since they ...


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We already can fly and hover and carry things while in flight. It is called swimming and what makes it possible is our physical relationship to the medium in which we swim, water. We are only slightly more massive than that medium and within our chests we keep two large sacks of a gas which is substantially lighter than that medium, so with lungs fully ...


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You don't even need to drink superfluid: you already would become covered in thin film of superfluid both outside and inside a few moments after you opened container holding it. Dependenig on fluid composition it can (optionaly): suffocate you - it will cover you lungs inside for sure. If it has large molecules ("not superfluid water") it will prevent ...


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I think you are mixing up superfluidity and superconductivity. The first has electrical neutral particles moving frictionless the other has charge moving frictionless. (To my understanding) Both phenomena can to some degree described similarly. Yet superfluids are special because they are fluids that show no friction and superconductivity is special because ...


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The biochemistry is already in place in humans to satisfy Rule 1, all we really need to do is tweak it for your purposes. As a rule, women older than around 35 are statistically more likely to give birth to twins or even more siblings due to their bodies naturally producing higher levels of Follicle Stimulating Hormone, or FSH for short. In older women, the ...


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As per my answer to Anatomically Correct Pegasus, pegasi should have a patagium connecting each leg to their wings. They are going to spread their legs just like a flying squirrel.


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I am assuming you want an answer about aerodynamics. I also am making a minor change to what we normally think of when we think of a pegasus. Normally we just imagine a horse with wings stuck on the back. I think the pegasus would also have small wing-like growths on its hind legs, as far down by the hooves as possible. Then, by straightening its hips ...


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To learn how low you can go, let us consider the illustrative example of the gentle Lampenflora. Lampenflora (translated page from German Wikipedia) Totality of all autotrophic plants, which are located in caves in the field of fixed lighting fixtures These are plants which are adapted to very low light such as occurs in show caves. They occur on the ...


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As far as I know light is only necessary to release electrons making further reactions possible. So as long as there is some light it’s not impossible for a kind of plant like organism to develop the necessary organs. That said I would expect that life will go down a path that is most efficient for its environment. That why it seems unlikely that we’d find ...


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Helium atoms are so small (even smaller than hydrogen thanks to their structure) that they permeate any material. There is real-world example it got into iPhone clock crystals and caused malfunction. Vacuum tubes and CRT displays, or even fluorescent lighting, will probably be impractical, they will require constantly pumping the helium out. Helium can cause ...


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Zeng et al. (2015) "Mass-Radius Relation for Rocky Planets based on PREM" might be useful for you. They give the following equation: $$\frac{R}{R_\oplus} = \left(1.07 - 0.21 \cdot \mathrm{CMF}\right) \cdot \left(\frac{M}{M_\oplus}\right)^{1/3.7}$$ Where $R$ and $M$ are the planetary radius and mass respectively, $R_\oplus$ and $M_\oplus$ are the radius ...


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I feel like I'm missing something about your question. If you want to be able to write faster-than-light travel into your world only using technology that has only been verified feasible by real-world scientists, I'm not sure what to tell you. I guess you'll have to wait and see before you start writing your story. You're writing future science fiction. ...


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Electroluminescence Short answer, the metal/alloy produces a high frequency low current EM field, and the voltage increases with more in proximity. The oxide layer produced by exposure to the atmosphere acts as an inorganic electroluminescent phosphor. The metal would be able to make other electroluminescent items glow as well. Long answer... ...


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Just an idea for you to build off, or anyone else with more science knowledge. - A play off magnetic material - as magnets do seem to call to each other, but not visibly. But suppose you have a special alien space alloy, this alloy is composed with a super rare-earth magnet type material. The stronger this special magnetic field the more the components ...


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Simpler Approach (no 𝜋 for you) Assume the density of silica is 1, and the density of iron is 3: The second planet's density will be 1*50% + 3*50% = 2.0 The first planet's density will be 1*70% + 3*30% = 1.6 The ratio of their densities will be 2.0 / 1.6 = 1.25 The ratio of their volumes will be 1 / 1.25 = .8 The ratio of their radii will be the cube root ...


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Biology first Human technology began with fire. Once we learned to make fire, we learned how to melt and shape metal. Chemistry, too, stems mainly from fire; heating and burning things to figure out what they were made of. An aquatic species is going to have a hard time going this route, but they have an advantage that land-dwellers lack - the richness of ...


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Kinda coming off other ideas, here. What if, the material constantly outputs a high frequency wave, i.e ultra violet, And that the metal will glow when subjected to the right frequency (materials that do one or the other exist IRL.) Then, when brought near eachother, the air filtering them slightly changes the frequency, and when at the right distance, will ...


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The material 1) needs to either contain a huge amount of energy or somehow continuously harvest energy to glow, and 2) needs to radiate and be sensitive to the same radiation to sense nearby pieces. My idea is that the material harvests vacuum energy and turns it into microwaves. Further, if the material is externally irradiated with microwaves it produces ...


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Fight helium with helium Let's imagine a bullet that would pierce the envelope of the target, then explodes to release its content in fine droplet inside the said envelope. "No point", I hear you say, "helium is not reactive and only and imaginary explosive would blow the envelope". Yes, but the content of our bullet is liquid helium.It would then quickly ...


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Short version : the second planet (same total mass) will have a radius that is larger than the first unless the second planet's core is larger (in mass) than the first. This makes perfect sense if you think about it. The smaller core has to have much more of the lighter exterior material to make up the total mass. The larger core needs less to make the ...


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TL;DR: there's not enough chlorine, not enough of that is it a convenient form, and there's far too much water to turn an earthlike world into an acidic chlorine world any time soon. Unless your attack timescales are very, very long, you'd best find an alternative attack mechanism. The timescales involved also give enemies lots of time to find counters to ...


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A Programmed Feature: This idea is inspired by Willk's answer, though there have been other good ideas in the thread. It's a deliberate design choice by the long ago designers of the craft. Meant to help highlight and locate damaged components - the nanites activate a phosphorescent effect whenever chunks of the ship become separated from each other. ...


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I don't think there is a true science answer for this. Materials don't behave this way. If this were in a large field, perhaps separated pieces would behave differently than the pieces merged. Consider metal in a microwave oven. Small pieces will spark and melt because the currents are too high. A large piece, like a metal bowl, will be fine with no ...


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It is alive. The pieces are calling to each other. its largest chunk begins glowing and doesn't stop glowing, sort of like a beacon for all its smaller pieces, which in turn glow brighter the closer they get to a larger chunk. These things want to be together. They are distressed to be apart. They are glowing because they are calling to each other....


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Have a look at Metamaterials Metamaterials are manufactured materials that have properties that natural materials do not have. Research into Metamaterials has been continuing for some time, and there are discussions that these materials would become more and more common in the near future as they approach viability, with some already in use today. They ...


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You could do worse than the Colorado river in the US. It starts up in the mountains near Denver. From Wikipedia Most of the basin is arid, defined by the Sonoran and Mojave deserts and the expanse of the Colorado Plateau, although significant expanses of forest are found in the Rocky Mountains; the Kaibab, Aquarius, and Markagunt plateaus in ...


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An updated version of chain shot. It looks like an ordinary large calibre bullet, but is actually made in two halves connected by steel cable. A fuse mechanism keeps the projectile together for .3 of a second after being fired, then the spin from rifling causes the two halves to pull the line tight just before it hits the target. Edit: Since the activation ...


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Penrose process By splitting a chunk of matter in two near a black hole in such a way that one piece drops into the black hole and the other escapes it, one can extract its rotational energy. This has way better energy efficiency than fusion (about 29% of original BH mass can be harvested), possibly more when using charged black holes. Description on ...


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Non-orientable wormholes The problem with antimatter is that you have to expend energy to create it. It might serve as a good energy storage medium, and there are interesting things you can do with animatter that you can't trivially do by other means, but by itself it isn't a source of energy and it couldn't replace fusion (there are potentially similar ...


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Matter - Antimatter Annihilation (Or just run matter into energy) Have you heard about mass-energy equivalence? It states that mass is equivalent to raw energy, and energy to mass in this formula: $$E = mc^2$$ That means that each gram of matter has 89,875,517,873,681,764 Joules of energy, that is, 90 petajoules. Annihilate a gram of matter with a gram of ...


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My answer is based on a previous answer which is about radiation. In my opinion that's exactly what you need. I thougth of Tritium which is usually used in watches to power the flourescent glow of the device. The problem is Tritium does not glow, it needs additional fluorescent material to do it, nor is it a metal. So I come up with two ideas: Should your ...


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the evacuated chamber is to perform some experiments. The spacecraft is of single stage to orbit variety. I am asking in terms of whether one can build it using generally used materials of construction like iron, etc. A chamber with the intention to contain just vacuum when in operation and when it's surrounded by vacuum is quite trivial to construct. You ...


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See someone has already answered with nuclear decay... My answer is not actually based on science, so I know my answer will not be popular. This is more based on junk science and sci-fi concepts that we haven't yet mastered or even come close to. Quantum entanglement/FTL communication is the best I've come up with, and that's more sci-fi than regular ...


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Your aquatic species could develop any level of technology we Telurians (People of Earth) have developed using the same processes we've developed but they might have different motivations. How they interact with their world will determine the form of their technologies. Do they have two arms or twenty? Do they have fingers or suckers? Assuming they have ...


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So this won't be quite what you are looking for, but its a really beautiful phenomenon: Cherenkov Blue! This beautiful blue is a direct result of gamma radiation. As the gamma rays hit the water, they must slow down to the speed of light in water. In doing so, they must give off energy. The result is a stream of blue photons. They're actually quite ...


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The original form of radio — spark gap transmitters — using morse code is highly resistive to disruption. CW morse communications are the military’s fall back solution in the advent of nuclear war because standard AM/FM/PSK/FSK communications are likely to fail. Also time synchronous communications are very robust. Things like cells phones and towers use ...


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Interstellar methanol clouds! I read up on methanol, I was surprised to learn that methanol is one of the most common molecules in interstellar space! https://web.archive.org/web/20110720152236/http://www.jodrellbank.manchester.ac.uk/news/2006/cloud/ Upgraded MERLIN spies cloud of alcohol spanning 288 billion miles Astronomers based at Jodrell Bank ...


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Use a fuel-air explosive, or perhaps several all on the same side of the ship. Airships tend to be rather delicate, and don't like being displaced from the side - so you set off your fuel-air bomb(s) close aboard one side of the vessel, which causes the entire vessel to bend - and hopefully to break. If you set if off close to the gondola or control room you ...


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So I have a different suggestion altogether. The practical thing might be to drill a hole through the horn and create some thing which is pre-cast and made pretty - then fitted to the horn and then welded into place The hole might weaken the horn, but it would LOOK stronger and more more intimidating. This method would allow the horn to also hold ...


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Although the question of whether there are gaps in the chemical table has been answered thoroughly here, and there has been some discussion of alternate fuel sources besides chemical combustion, I would like to expound upon that a bit. The reason why is because, although there are no gaps in the periodic table, there is plenty of room for new stuff in the ...


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You need bullet proof, unassailable technology to solve this problem! The Post No radio to be disrupted. No electricity or wires needed. Before there ever was radio based communications or even the telegram, there was the Post Office. A letter requires no fancy equipment to make and no exotic energy defeating technology to deliver.


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Were Mwindo to remain in the womb for 22 months instead of 9 as usual, he'd want to be able to perform magic in-utero, since otherwise his failure to be born on schedule would be fatal for himself and quite likely for his mother too, for two reasons: The first reason is that the human placenta has a maximum lifespan of a little over 9 months, after which ...


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Let's assume you don't open the two portals at exactly the same time. You always have 2 universes that have only 1 portal. Opening a portal in one of them gets rid of a 1-portal universe, but doubles the other one. The rate of the doublings depends on the desync rate and the difference in portal-opening times. In your example, the second pair open a portal ...


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What alternative wireless communication form exists that might survive such disruption i.e. is less prone to interference than radio waves. Free-space optical communication. Lasers and LEDs and photodiodes and so on. It can only be line of sight, and long range links are generally point-to-point, but it does exist and work right now. You couldn't keep your ...


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There's no definitive answer, following is a few possible explanations. Trying to hold strictly to "syncing": Open a portal from universe A to universe B, portal is called A0<->B0 (bit to designate portal location) While synced, universes A and B each open a new portal. Since they are synced, these new portals are in the same location and go to the same ...


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