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You need more than dead. You need deadly. I submit that the planets that form your "dead worlds barrier" are all highly radioactive, or poisonous in some way. You brought up Halo, so maybe something like the Flood is on every one of those planets. I don't know what could irradiate so many worlds over so large an area, but maybe that could be part of your ...


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I think the nature of their FTL drive makes a big difference. How far can they go between stops? And now much choice do they have about where to go? With decent range and a drive that lets you go basically anywhere it would be pretty hard to have a viable barrier. However, some SF drives are only fixed point-to-point, your fuel cost is based mostly on ...


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A third civilisation occupies the space between these empires. This empire prevented any travel across the area of galactic space which was sandwiched between the two civilisations in question. Due to their xenophobic attitude leading to one or both their neighbours wiping them out, or some internal strife that has changed their attitude. The end result ...


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Desert doesn't stop humans, and never has. If there are no refueling stations, one side or the other or both will build them. If there is anything at all someone will figure out how to turn it into fuel or some other raw material. At the very least you have these convenient fusion reactors aka suns. A large dead zone won't stop anyone, because it simply won'...


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Precursor Sub-Space Gray Goo accident If the worlds are just "dead" that's not going to be enough to stop FTL travel, you need something in subspace/hyperspace/slipspace that is a serious threat. Enter the first Type III alien species. Their empire literally spanned the galaxy, yet for cultural reasons they stuck to a narrow (galacticly speaking) band ...


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Is there any particular reason why you need both civilizations to be part of the same galaxy? Because if not, then by far the simplest solution is to put them in different galaxies at opposite ends of the universe, and then have someone discover a wormhole if you ever need them to interact. No need to introduce weird regions within a galaxy so expansive that ...


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Yes; Taking the book '2321' as inspiration: We do not know that small isolated biospheres/technospheres are possible. Physics-minded people imagine that it's possible to construct mechanical system with <0.001% of the mass of Earth that can support a human for 100 years, but that might not be true. Life is messy in ways that we don't really understand. ...


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Yes, but.... A barrier of dead worlds would only work if there are better prospects in another direction. Also, the worlds need to be both dead and useless. Why try to build a town in a desert when there is a river nearby? If there's nothing useful in the barrier then curiosity will only take people so far. Remember that they can make habitats where ...


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What if the fuel had the following properties? It's possible all of these together would be too large of a contrivance, though. The fuel must be created/refined on an industrialized planet, preventing the fuel from being gathered in-situ by general-purpose craft. This could be explained by: needing access to a planetary core; requiring a natural gravity ...


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Space ship plague. It's extremely contagious and slowly destroys space ships or vital space ship parts. There's some microscopic life form LF capable of surviving in space which makes a meal of space ship materials. Once a space ship has been infected, the LF steadily eats away at it, but slowly enough that you might not even realize you're infected until ...


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Yes, if they regularly need resources for travel and those “dead worlds” (or simply empty space) don’t provide them. Maybe their faster-than-light drives have to be refueled regularly and it’s impossible to carry more than a certain amount of fuel (because it goes critical or something like that). The dead worlds were harvested by an ancient civilization ...


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This is basically a variant of Willk's answer (it needs to be "dead and weird"). You specifically mention Star Wars technology, and I happen to know Star Wars uses "hyperspace" for its faster-than-light drives. A quick Google search confirms that Halo uses "slipspace", which is basically the same thing. In both cases, they rely on jumping from normal space ...


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I came here because the title says "what could power an Alcubierre drive", although you actually want to know what drives it. Still, I'll quickly give you my thoughts on the power question. The power for an Alcubierre drive would have to come from antimatter or black holes because no other known source of energy would be plentiful enough. With black holes ...


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No Refueling stations for spaceships will be in space. Too much fuel is lost going up and down a gravity well. A dead world is perfectly fine and might be a good source of fuel making material. Even empty space is fine as long as fuel haulers keep it restocked. An asteroid belt could also work. A refueling station can be anywhere but preferably near fuel ...


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Yes, potentially. If all we require is two civilizations separated by distance within the same galaxy, then we can say they evolved separately in opposite spiral arms. The planets in the middle of the galaxy aren't just dead, they're contaminated. This could be because of a terrible ancient galactic war, or some natural phenomenon (like colliding ...


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Black Hole Drives If you have an interstellar civilization, presumably travel between stars is somewhat fast (i.e., weeks to months, rather than decades to centuries). None of the technologies we have today are remotely suitable for such interstellar travel. Nor have you stated how hard-science you want your drive technology to be. But if you want ...


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You need more than dead. You need dead and weird. Interstellar spaces are huge. Ships need to be able to traverse these distances. The fact that there are clumps of matter - "dead worlds" - in between that are not useful to these ships should make no difference. It is like the fact that there are some empty office buildings on my route home. Who cares?...


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Yes, but it will depend heavily on the values of each civilization. A pragmatic society will only visit solar systems they expect to be worth the return on investment based on what they already know. They will do years of analysis for hazardous solar activity, scan for signs of existing civilizations, search for promising exoworlds, and send unmanned ...


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Probably not. Galactic civilizations require a lot of time to develop. If you have a growing civilization that grows in the span of 100.000 years then the light of their activity has also reached 100.000 lightyears of space. A quick google search of the first 3 Galaxies show them anywhere between 30.000 to 100.000 lightyears in size. So at the very least ...


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Yes this is a realistic possibility. If Earth ever develops a probe that can travel long distances. You can bet we will pick a target where we think life exists, probably the direction that involves passing the most candidates as possible. If we find life, that will probably be where we focus all our efforts. So for your galactic civilizations, you just ...


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An Alcubierre drive can't exist at all, if by "drive" you mean something analogous to what you find in Star Trek/Wars: you have a region of your ship filled with some unspecified phlebotinum, you send a go signal to it, it powers up and you go zipping off in whatever direction you want. This is impossible because the exterior part of the Alcubierre warp ...


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It is important to note that you do not need negative mass for an Alcubierre drive to work, but negative mass density. The difference is subtle, but important for actually being able to build a warp drive. Essentially what the equations say is that to bend space in the appropriate manner for a warp drive (i.e. to expand space behind your spacecraft and ...


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Is that sort of exotic matter purely hypothetical? Mostly. There appear to be things that might be suitable... Alcubierre suggested the Casimir effect, but that's pretty weedy. Dark energy might also fit the bill, but as to how you'd actually make it do what you want it to do, instead of appearing out of nowhere and blowing up your universe... your guess is ...


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The answer offered by Zeiss is well-put-together, and so I avoid repeating those thoughts and instead offer another potential solution. The man behind the Alcubierre drive, Miguel Alcubierre, realized that his demand for a matter with negative energy may not ever be feasible, so he proposed an alternative: a Casimir vacuum. Just as the other answerer, I am ...


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As far as I'm aware (I'm neither an astrophysicist, nor do I play one on television, and I didn't sleep at a particular hotel chain last night), that's been one of the perceived sticking points for construction of an actual Alcubierre drive -- the inability to even define what exotic matter is, never mind say for certain how to obtain or create it. In order ...


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The main time-eaters on such a projects are tests and reconnaissance mission. So the answer depends on required reliability. 1) If we can "afford" to loose mission or two - than it would take about the same as Apollo program - about 5 years for first landing (Apollo nearly lost one mission and there were deaths on tests). But by post-coldwar standards this ...


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It depends entirely on how desperate the need is Or rather, what likelihood of failure the organisers are willing to accept. We already have a design for a machine that can take three people to the moon, allow them to stay there for 24 hours and return. We went from zero to first launch of the Saturn V in about 5 years. And the plans still exist, and are ...


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If all the nations in the world banded together and formed a public-sector agency to consider the best way to define and implement this goal, and if every person on Earth contributed to the project to the best of his ability, it would probably take about nine years from commitment to safe return. If all the nations in the world banded together and formed a ...


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Starfish Prime already explained the stabilisation and alignment aspects. This answer focuses purely on: Do I have to imagine a stable shell, like a package of Twix, with the two twix counter-rotating inside? An O'Neil cylinder doesn't have to look like this, but it is the most plausabile way to build them. You could of cause go for the classical pair ...


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You need two contra-rotating cylinders in order to neutralise the gyroscopic effects of a single spinning cylinder, and as a way to use the whole habitat as a momentum wheel. You need to keep the cylinders with one endcap pointing at the sun throughout their entire orbit, so as to keep the mirrors illuminated during station daytime. This means they need to ...


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I doubt this will ever be seen, being such an old thread...but I had an idea recently, and this thread came up during an intellectually curious search. Space racing could be done really soon, in my opinion, using the same basic theme as FPV drones. Pilots would be on Earth, and have nice equipment which would point to space. A course would be launched into ...


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