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1 vote

Possible alternatives to nebulas as a celestial smokescreen

You are off by several orders of magnitude, I think. Clouds and nebulae-like object are opaque because they span for huge distance, so there is enough room for light crossing them to be noticeably ...
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0 votes

Is this concept for very low energy space travel plausible?

The sail ships are pushed home by exterior lasers If the the timing of their system-wide mass sweep is planned well, they could intentionally leave several dwarf planets or other large masses ...
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4 votes

Suborbital Flight: Duration, Acceleration, Delta-V

How High? After playing Kerbal Space Program with Realism Overhaul mod, I can tell you that a delta-V of around 9 km/s is needed to reach orbit (this is about 2 km/s more than orbital velocity; there ...
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1 vote

When would we notice an object entering our solar system at 0.20c (20% speed of light)?

Didn't get an answer to a question I placed in the original post so I'll make a basic assumption here. (Assuming for instance some form of realistic fusion drive?) Some time after it starts ...
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0 votes

Is this concept for very low energy space travel plausible?

I see you've already accepted an answer, however I wanted to share some additional information. Per this answer on the physics stackexchange, you can approximate the time it will take any craft to ...
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0 votes

Is this concept for very low energy space travel plausible?

If you're trying to predict the future, that might be scientifically feasible but roughly when do you hope suitable technology will be developed? If this is fiction, it sounds far less unfeasible than ...
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8 votes
Accepted

When would we notice an object entering our solar system at 0.20c (20% speed of light)?

Sorry! Despite the undeserved check mark, the first calculation I jotted down had two errors that threw off the result... that I know of so far. Now I'm getting that it is a warm 786 K but nowhere ...
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0 votes

What would be the least physics breaking way to travel at light speed or faster?

'Newer physics text book' next chapter Most of the proposed solutions involve the mechanism for travel be inherent in the spaceship. The ship itself carries the delta-V. Okay, that gives tremendous ...
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2 votes

Is this concept for very low energy space travel plausible?

As others have mentioned, stars don't die in the way you seem to be describing. The stellar objects that do slowly cool are already quite "dead"...that's why they're cooling. It's also hard ...
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2 votes

Is this concept for very low energy space travel plausible?

I'm afraid you're out of luck on this one. The "sails" must be completely absorptive, since if they reflect the laser energy you'll get stray reflections running around the interior of the ...
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1 vote

A device to negate time dilation believability

It's time dilation or time travel Let's look at a particular scenario: A beam of light bouncing between two mirrors on a ship in space. On the ship, the distance between the mirrors is 4 metres, and ...
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8 votes

Is this concept for very low energy space travel plausible?

No If natural gravity could pull the ship back to the Dyson Sphere, it would already be pulling the asteroids the ship was sent out to get. This process would be insanely slow. What value could ...
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1 vote

What would be the least physics breaking way to travel at light speed or faster?

The issue with avoiding science handwaving is that you are asking for an answer which does not exist. Due to that, every answer is going to contain a bit of fantasy. Any method used should be safe ...
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6 votes
Accepted

Is this concept for very low energy space travel plausible?

The biggest issue with energy loss is stopping at the destination. A fuel burned to produce thrust will be pointed directly away from the Dyson sphere. Since mass is energy, the loss of any mass is ...
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11 votes

Is this concept for very low energy space travel plausible?

In space, there is no free lunch If you're thinking that waiting for gravity to bring you back is reasonable, then a solar sail option is inefficient and unreliable. You don't have an atmosphere to ...
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4 votes

Is this concept for very low energy space travel plausible?

Since this is a very high tech society, and presumably the bureaucracy only cares about the net energy or mass that is returned to the sphere. Perhaps they temperature regulate the sphere by ...
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1 vote

What would be the least physics breaking way to travel at light speed or faster?

What year is the physics book that you are using to determine 'reality'? Our physics textbook keeps getting thicker and thicker every year. Not only are the chapters expanded on, but entirely new ...
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0 votes

Is this concept for very low energy space travel plausible?

Angular Momentum is Not Your Friend The method to go in and out sounds good. Subject to the efficiency rating of your solar sails of course. The problem is you need more energy to get that asteroid ...
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0 votes

What does the view outside my ship traveling at light speed look like?

In reality, this would be an impossible question to ask. The light behind you would never catch up, and the light in front of you would be blue-shifted so high that it would be like peering into the ...
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0 votes

What would be the least physics breaking way to travel at light speed or faster?

Q: What would be the least physics breaking way to travel at light speed or faster? Leaving a paradigm defining a reference frame is no small change. I can't go into "or faster", because ...
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2 votes

What would be the least physics breaking way to travel at light speed or faster?

Quantum tunneling Quantum tunneling is a well documented phenomenon. To explain a poorly understood incredibly complex problem in an answer here would be impossible, so lets do the basics. A wave, ...
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2 votes

What would be the least physics breaking way to travel at light speed or faster?

Lentz drive Come on people, sci-fi requires keeping up with the literature! The negative mass required for an Alcubierre drive is not needed, according to Erik Lentz (with agreement from Lavinia ...
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0 votes

Galactic 'geographic' features, how could they impact galactic colonization efforts?

STL travel is limited to shielding concerns. Do the figures about how much heat you have to get rid of per square meter, punching through vacuum at 10% of c, with a typical gas density of 1 atom of H ...
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2 votes

What is the best animal to cryogenically freeze then revive?

Border collie puppy. source Here is puppy 654958. She is not the only puppy on this ship. 654959, 654960 and 654963 are her crewmates. 654961 had a freezer malfunction and did not get thawed - she ...
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7 votes

What is the best animal to cryogenically freeze then revive?

Frog Icicle Some frogs freeze solid in the winter. Then when it warms up they thaw out and get back to eating bugs. See here. tap tap tap
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6 votes

What is the best animal to cryogenically freeze then revive?

There are primates barely bigger than hamsters -- the pygmy marmoset, for instance, grows to only 4 1/2 to 6 inches (11 - 15 cm) length and a few tens of grams. And yet, this is an actual monkey. It ...
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1 vote

What would be the least physics breaking way to travel at light speed or faster?

Time travel is fine, but there is a limit to how long you live. You might zip from Point A to Point B, to the observer, but you’ll still feel the journey’s length, no matter how quick or long it ...
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6 votes

What would be the least physics breaking way to travel at light speed or faster?

Soft Wormhole Soft wormholes do not require us to invent any new physics. Soft wormholes break no known laws of physics. The topology of spacetime is not flat. It has tunnels. Going from Earth to ...
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6 votes

What would be the least physics breaking way to travel at light speed or faster?

Frame challenge: The Mystery Engine™ Going at the speed of light breaks physics as we know them (and maybe they're wrong, it's only our best collective understanding of how the universe works after ...
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17 votes

What would be the least physics breaking way to travel at light speed or faster?

Wormholes. You don't actually travel faster than light yourself, you're just taking a shortcut. The problem is, that it would still break causality unless all wormholes in the universe existed in the ...
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35 votes

What would be the least physics breaking way to travel at light speed or faster?

Alcubierre Drive The only FTL system theorized with any real world evidence that it could actually be doable is the Alcubierre Drive. Using the Alcubierre metric, it has been mathematically ...
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0 votes

What would be the least physics breaking way to travel at light speed or faster?

Create a method to decouple from the Higgs field, thus negating mass )and presumably inertia). This would still presumably stop at c rather than allowing infinite velocity.
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39 votes
Accepted

What would be the least physics breaking way to travel at light speed or faster?

Space pump. After all, why waste your time and fuel actually traveling through space? With only a half-dose of handwavium, you can just take that space between you and your destination and move it ...
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1 vote

How would a spaceship not affected by gravity navigate between planets?

Fuel consumption will make your math more complicated... but the technology is still worth exploiting If you have a rocket ship in a perfect state of null gravity, and try to launch it, it will ...
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0 votes

How would a spaceship not affected by gravity navigate between planets?

Please do NOT do this. It's trivial to show that any kind of anti-gravity thingy is in fact a infinite energy source (i.e. even worse than a perpetual motion machine). If you recall basic General ...
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1 vote

How would a spaceship not affected by gravity navigate between planets?

LaGrange points aren't just a gravitational phenomena. They're based on both gravity and momentum. L1 would still exist as a quasi-stable null gravitational node, but for all of the rest, momentum and ...
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5 votes
Accepted

How would a spaceship not affected by gravity navigate between planets?

Hmm... Interesting. You could use X-matter's antigravity to get out of the Earth's atmosphere, I suppose, but I don't think there'd be much point. X-matter is probably expensive, so you wouldn't want ...
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1 vote

How would a spaceship not affected by gravity navigate between planets?

It would be utilizing Null matter to reduce fuel required on take off and/or reduce the hassles from landing process since less acceleration needed = less fuel required to do so(ie orbiting/creating ...
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0 votes

Galactic 'geographic' features, how could they impact galactic colonization efforts?

Just yawning stretches of emptiness. Perhaps civilisations like ours in the spiral arms can only really hop along the arms. Travelling large void areas would just take too long. Perhaps all the ...
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6 votes

Galactic 'geographic' features, how could they impact galactic colonization efforts?

Flipping Black-holes. They normally have predictable rotation, an accretion disk that behaves in a nice orderly fashion and an ejection of x-rays and very fast ions in regular and expected directions ...
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6 votes
Accepted

Galactic 'geographic' features, how could they impact galactic colonization efforts?

That's a good start for space hazards. Even though humanity has only dipped our toes into space, we are still very concerned about radiation. Not only is there a cancer risk, but there as also a risk ...
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2 votes

Galactic 'geographic' features, how could they impact galactic colonization efforts?

Gravity and radiation might make them difficult to contend with, but who cares. Because if you're only moving to close stars you won't be getting anywhere near them. So they shouldn't be problems.
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1 vote

Where could artificial satellites be placed in a binary planet system?

The most stable place for a satellite to orbit in a binary planet system is actually not around either of the two planets, but rather around the system's barycenter. This is because the gravitational ...
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1 vote
Accepted

Where could artificial satellites be placed in a binary planet system?

Unless the planets are less than a few diameters apart, low orbits should be reasonably stable. The highest we consider LEO is about 1/4 of an earth radius above sea level (the lowest are about 1/32)....
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1 vote

Plausible evolutionary pressure for an organism to evolve space flight?

Assuming a minimal gravity to retain a life-sustaining atmosphere does not make things easier! Retaining an atmosphere requires a certain minimum escape velocity, and that's exactly what you want to ...
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3 votes

Plausible evolutionary pressure for an organism to evolve space flight?

Yes, but not on a planet First off, it is impossible to me that life evolves naturally to panspermia on a planet. The energy requirements for launching yourself into space are astronomical, the ...
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4 votes
Accepted

Is a Bussard Ramjet for collecting water possible

Not really You appear to be mixing up some ideas. The Bussard Ramjet, like all ramjets, collects nothing. Unlike turbine engines, ramjets have no moving parts and use the force of incoming matter (in ...
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3 votes

Is a Bussard Ramjet for collecting water possible

Asteroids Some asteroids contain ice. It is easier to gather from asteroids than planets, since you don't need to design your spaceship to be capable of entering and then leaving the big gravity well ...
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2 votes

How could an organism reach escape velocity using only biological means?

The energy budgets of interplanetary travel on reasonably short time lines are insanely large. Earth's escape velocity is 11 km/s. Every kg of matter we push out of the Earth's gravity well is 60,000,...
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2 votes

How could an organism reach escape velocity using only biological means?

How could a creature reach escape velocity using only biological means? Not practically. On earth escape velocity is 11.2 km/s, or over 25,000 mph. This is so far beyond anything that a biological ...
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