New answers tagged

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**A detached shield or series of shields ** made of harvested matter traveling in front of the spacecraft. (Plus magnetic shielding for charged particles.) Basically you would have to accelerate properly shaped impact shield/s to the same speed you wish to travel at and then travel in the 'shadow' of that shield all the way to your destination. The shield/s ...


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Isaac Arthur's "Interstellar Challenges" video raises the same concerns, namely that, after a certain speed, point defenses are just not reliable. A laser-driven ship has the advantage that the laser can fire before the ship gets in the beam, which could somewhat clear the path, but you'll need something more , especially if you're going somewhere ...


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Needle ship. The most relevant impactors are those encountered in the direction of travel, directly ahead of the ship. Mostly the ship will be ramming slower things in the way because it is so fast. The smaller the forward profile of the ship, the less things it will ram. The ship is thus maximally long and thin, a flying needle. The ship tapers to a ...


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Leaving all fancy yet-to-be-invented physics aside, one plausible method would be pushing large chunk of ice in front of the ship. The ice can be used as reaction mass for fusion engine, works as a shield and is useful resource anyway. The ship simply hides behind the iceberg in the acceleration and cruise phase. When decelerating, the whole setup gets ...


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I don't want to assume any flat out impossible ideas, it is supposed to be somewhat realistic. The issue of inertia Most Sci-fi either hand waves in some variation of inertia dampener or non-newtonian drive, neither of which have any scientific basis. When you accelerate a crew in the real world, they experience inertial forces similar to gravity; so, if ...


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My completely unrealistic idea- have an atomic diverter, a device that takes objects in front and reconstructs them behind the ship in mostly the same way. My more realistic idea- have a suicide ship in front, basically a big metal wall with rocket boosters(or whatever your propulsion system is) to block all the debris. Of course, you shouldn't fly through ...


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The ship needs a small fleet of small sensors flying ahead of it to detect any potentially problematic objects as they fly past and help deal with them. The main ship could be fed data concerning speed and direction at the speed of light so would get advanced warning of approaching objects at 0.8c and could have time to activate high powered lasers to ...


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People are going to take souvenirs anyway, no matter what the law says I come from paleontology. In my field, I have seen a lot of colleagues pocket rocks or small chunks of bone from fossil sites, even if they are working in an area where it is forbidden by law from taking rocks or fossil chunks from a fossil site (either because it is in a national park or ...


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The crew may bring back pretty much anything they judge safe and sane to bring back. Final word on what may be brought back will be left to the mission commander with veto from the crew commander. With that comes legal liabilities. Only disobeying orders, disregarding protocol, and general recklessness should be punishable. Mistakes, no matter the magnitude, ...


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No Biologicals, no weapons i.e. a face hugger is not a collectable nor is someones antique nuclear hand grenade. All tech items are checked/scanned for purpose and function before boarding. Other than that a contract with potentially severe civil and criminal penalties requiring all collectables to be logged, scanned and tagged to its owners before boarding ...


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Keep in mind, you can't stop "human" nature There is no law, no policing force, not threat of violence, that can completely stop the all-too-human (but not exclusively human) desire to take a souvenir. A friend of mine was golfing on Guam when he and a friend teed off and dropped their balls over a rise they couldn't see over. They searched for the ...


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Submit and wait: I think the simplest thing to do is the bureaucratic one - everything you want to keep has to be turned in, then a committee needs to examine and approve the item. NO LIFEFORMS, period. Everything else would undergo scientific examination, and if it proved to be insignificant and safe, it could be returned, properly registered. Anything that ...


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It's all on a per-item basis, where the function and value of the item are compared to the total value of what has been discovered and inherent risks of exploration. If you find an empty planet with a single personal teleportation device that isn't available anywhere else, you likely aren't going to be allowed to keep it. If you hit a planet where at great ...


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Keepsakes would be included in their Intellectual Property Waiver A similar problem was encountered in the early days of the modern technology industry. People were hired by companies to R&D valuable technologies for their employers, but while being paid handsomely to research one thing at work, they would have a multi-million dollar idea "in their ...


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Each crewmember has an official weight allowance for personal gear. This could be a crucifix or rosary, a framed picture of a loved one, whatever. The allowance is big enough for a few consumables, too. Sweets, liquor, whatever. (Subject to safety regulations. No drunkenness without permission.) As consumables are consumed the crewmember can request a weight ...


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This is a minimisation problem on a graph From your description, you have a set of stars which are connected by an arbitrary network of wormholes, each of which can be assigned some 'distance'. You want a two-dimensional representation of this universe (i.e. a map) which is close to accurately representing the distances. The natural way to draw this map is ...


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You can use color to add more spatial dimensions to points that you're plotting. The map would be read by taking in to account both the distance between stars in 2D and the difference in their colors. I can think of some ways to do this: Making it look like the stars are in a fog, so that farther stars have more of the background color than nearer stars. ...


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Use an actual map. I found this here: https://www.distantias.com/distances-from-frankfurt_am_main-germany-to-capital-cities.htm#map2 You plug in your city and it will show you distances to nearby cities. This has many benefits. 1: You can center your map wherever you like. I can use this same website and put Vienna in the center, or Kyoto. You can have ...


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You say that: We currently have a cool looking sub-way style map, with a lot of things in arbitrary places and shapes, unfortunately this caused a lot of gameplay bugs. But in the comments, you say: The artist assumed that the distance didn't matter, and so he used whatever looked better, giving arbitrary sizes and distances to things. You could work on ...


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There isn't any mapping from 3D to 2D that will preserve pairwise distances between all points. Using time as a measure doesn't fundamentally change anything about the problem, since instead of "distance" being measured in km/AU/lightyears, it's instead measured in hours/days/years - but you still just have a series of pairwise distances between ...


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For (e) any rigid tower would I guess by definition be orbiting the moon above a set point. But not because it is in a geostationary orbit. It doesn't look like the moon really has geostationary orbits due to the influence of the Earth's gravity. https://www.quora.com/Does-the-Moon-have-a-geostationary-orbit-If-so-what-is-its-altitude For (f) you are ...


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First of all, both light and radio waves travel thru space at the same speed - at speed of light. They are both just electromagnetic waves of different frequencies. Electromagnetic waves (so both light and radio) can pass thru wormholes just like objects made from matter. You don't have to record your messages on physical objects. You may need to have a ...


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Ship's characteristics: Powerplant : fusion Size : 35 m (length) x ~ 17.5 m (width) x ~ 10m (height) Fuel : offboard Desired Performance : deep interplanetary (kuiper belt) Power per reaction: Deuterium ($^2H$) + Tritium ($^3H$) = Helium ($^4He$) + 3.5 MeV (source) Helium to Carbon ($^4_2He + ^4_2He \rightarrow ^{12}_6C$) = 7.275 MeV (net; by way of ...


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Disappointingly, from inside a nebula will look pretty much like "empty" space. Because it is empty space; most gas nebulae are thinner vacuum than anything that's routinely produced in a lab (including the interiors of particle accelerators, laser cavities, or inside vacuum tubes). In order to see a nebula as an "object" you need to see ...


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Traveller 2300 (roleplaying game) One of the nice features of this roleplaying game was: The Near Star Catalog The Traveller: 2300universe deals with star systems within 50 light years of Earth. Extensive research and analysis has produced the most accurate star map ever made. Never before has such a monumentouts task been undertaken, either in gaming or in ...


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I would compare space warfare to submarine actions. There is nothing to see in submarine warfare either, and you are surrounded by an unforgiving element in which any hull breach could be deadly. If the hull does get breached, things get interesting for the crew. The enemy is invisible and you will not know about an attack until it hits. You are dependent on ...


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If you're looking to get a feel for the scale, rather than perhaps deal with the exact numbers and trajectories You might try a simulation, such as Space Engine With this, you can see the distances involved and what stars are relatively nearer one another. I think for story-telling purposes this is probably more valuable.


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Like an airplane Edit: only now I see a hard science tag, but not sure what is requested in that case. There are already scenarios where this is happening, both in combat as well as in civilian situations. Airplanes are moving at high speeds in the sky. Although we use our vision, it is actually a poor way to see. Most of it is assisted by computers and ...


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Force fields would rely on power. Power can be shut off. Power can fail. Thus windows could be vacated with the flick of a switch or the crash of a computer or control system. Not the ideal protection system. Ideally, you'd have standard windows and doors and still have the force field in place. Acrylic and glass would not generally hold up in spacecraft in ...


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Using Sol as an example... The other answers are very precise, both in their information and in their descriptions of the limitations of finding a generalizable answer. If you want specific distances between stars, yes, go with the ever-amazing Wolfram Alpha (link goes to the answer to your specific question). With all of that in mind, here's a guide to how ...


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You can site your story in a place where you like the star distances. Our star is in the suburbs of our galaxy. Large lawns. Swimming pools. Renan's answer is good for that. But there are places more like downtown Hong Kong where star density is much higher. Here is Messier 15 in our galaxy. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Messier_15 https://astronomy.com/...


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An exact answer The position of a star in space can be specified by three coordinates: Its right ascension, $\alpha$, its declination, $\delta$, which are collectively referred to as equatorial coordinates, and its distance from Earth, $d$. It's probably easiest to calculate the distance between two stars by converting equatorial coordinates to Cartesian ...


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I don't know if there is any catalogue that will give you the information you need. You will have to math it out. Think of this: there are up to 10,000 stars visible to the naked eye, so a full table with all the distances between any giver pair would have around 50,000,000 rows. It would be a really large book. So you have to math it out. The easy way is to ...


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