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4 votes

How would time dilate for pioneers travelling to Alpha Centauri Cb?

I am not sure if I follow other answers. Let's ignore time dilation before we hit the desired travel speed for simplicity. At 3g acceleration and deceleration we can reach the speed of light in 4 ...
Cem Kalyoncu's user avatar
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3 votes

How would time dilate for pioneers travelling to Alpha Centauri Cb?

Assuming you have inertial dampeners or functional equivalent, so that we don't need to worry about squishing the squishy humans as in g s's answer, there's an easy ...
N. Virgo's user avatar
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11 votes

How would time dilate for pioneers travelling to Alpha Centauri Cb?

A little bit more than 4.2 years. For any large time dilation factor, the astronauts spend most of the journey very close to the speed of light in the Earth frame, so you don't need to do a hard ...
g s's user avatar
  • 7,267
1 vote

How would humans on Earth detect a Shkadov thruster on other side of the Milky Way Galaxy?

A note on timescales Other answers have given nice details about detecting the star movement, so I'll focus on a different part of your question: would it make sense for the humans to already know ...
Syndic's user avatar
  • 6,632
1 vote

How would humans on Earth detect a Shkadov thruster on other side of the Milky Way Galaxy?

I don't think this would be possible. 18000 light-years is really far away, and at that distance, the actual movement of the stars at the acceleration of a shadkov thruster would make such a tiny ...
Bubbles's user avatar
  • 879
1 vote

How would humans on Earth detect a Shkadov thruster on other side of the Milky Way Galaxy?

It's rare for activity of any kind on the other side of the galaxy to be detected due to the intervening dust lanes which block out light. Certainly you are safe from amateur instruments detecting ...
jrrk's user avatar
  • 131
1 vote

How would humans on Earth detect a Shkadov thruster on other side of the Milky Way Galaxy?

Any sufficiently large structure capable of harnessing solar energy by order of Yottawatt scale, would produce A highly detectable infrared signature. Theoretical physicist Freeman Dyson postulated ...
LazyReader's user avatar
11 votes

How would humans on Earth detect a Shkadov thruster on other side of the Milky Way Galaxy?

My other inclination is that we'd be able to see a Shkadov thruster by monitoring these far away stars, given their immense size and the sheer amount of reflected light output. I assume they'd be ...
LSerni's user avatar
  • 55.4k
1 vote

How would humans on Earth detect a Shkadov thruster on other side of the Milky Way Galaxy?

Parallax measurements are very difficult at great distances. But perhaps a large telescope could be sent out of the Solar System using some new form of propulsion (fusion drive perhaps) for just such ...
Slarty's user avatar
  • 37.6k
8 votes

How would humans on Earth detect a Shkadov thruster on other side of the Milky Way Galaxy?

One of the biggest problems your astronomers have is establishing the velocity vector of the affected stars at all. The velocity component of your moving stars that is directly towards or away from ...
Starfish Prime's user avatar
0 votes

How would FTL travel based on tachyons most likely work?

What is a Tachyon anyway? To an outside observer, no object can move faster than the speed of light... but the important part here is "to an outside observer". Tachyon theory states that ...
Nosajimiki's user avatar
  • 95.1k
0 votes

How would FTL travel based on tachyons most likely work?

We don't know whether tachyons exist at all. Tachyons are (as far as my limited understanding of physics goes) a hypothetical particle. Here's how that works: Einstein says particles (with a rest mass,...
mcv's user avatar
  • 879
2 votes

How would FTL travel based on tachyons most likely work?

If you want a sort-of-coherent description of tachyon behavior, consider the following: a tachyon is a specially-engineered microscale black hole with an Alcubierre-like warp field built into it. You ...
controlgroup's user avatar
  • 4,766
7 votes

How would FTL travel based on tachyons most likely work?

Since this is SCIENCE-FICTION question, lets play a bit fast and lose here: Your ship travels at FTL speeds by basically abusing Quantum Entanglement: It finds a spot somewhere else in the universe ...
Going Durden's user avatar
  • 3,936
1 vote

How would FTL travel based on tachyons most likely work?

Frame Challenge I suggest that you look at some writers who have used FTL in their stories. I'd start with Ursula LeGuin, Arthur C Clark, Isaac Asimov, even E. E Smith. They all use magic or hand ...
Simon Crase's user avatar
-1 votes

How would FTL travel based on tachyons most likely work?

There is a 2nd universe, parallel, folded away into the bubble-centers of https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Galaxy_filament, a anti-verse, where the speed of light is different and does not apply. Space ...
Pica's user avatar
  • 4,578
3 votes

How would FTL travel based on tachyons most likely work?

Magic Let us ignore all the initial problems with tachyons being theoretical and the like. There is a very simple problem to solve. You want the spaceship and it's occupants to 'ride along' and go FTL....
Trioxidane's user avatar
  • 37.1k
2 votes

How would FTL travel based on tachyons most likely work?

If you have tachyons there is one obvious way this is possible: Alcubierre drive. The current theoretical problem with the Alcubierre drive is that to keep contracting space in front and expand it ...
Demigan's user avatar
  • 45.4k
2 votes

How would FTL travel based on tachyons most likely work?

The basic problem here is that you are asking about something that is forbidden by physics and then asking how would physics deal with it. In science nothing is absolutely written in stone and any ...
Slarty's user avatar
  • 37.6k
3 votes

How would FTL travel based on tachyons most likely work?

Tachyons are imaginary, but that doesn't mean they don't exist. The way they're theorized, they're like quarks, but with a different set of quantum statistics. The creation of the Bose-Einstein ...
Robert Rapplean's user avatar
10 votes

How would FTL travel based on tachyons most likely work?

Nope. And here's a bit of why... From any point in time and space there is a Schwarzschild double cone, extending into the past and future at the speed of light. Everything within the cone exists ...
Richard Kirk's user avatar
  • 9,489
16 votes

How would FTL travel based on tachyons most likely work?

Not even a little bit plausible. But neither is Star Trek's warp drive, or any other free-form FTL travel in any other setting, so there's not a problem. Just saying that there is faster than light ...
g s's user avatar
  • 7,267
5 votes

How would FTL travel based on tachyons most likely work?

"Does any of this seem plausible from a theoretical standpoint?" No, it doesn't. Oh, and tachyons do not actually exist, therefore you cannot be "familiar with how they work". They ...
AlexP's user avatar
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