New answers tagged

1

Theoretically it is possible...all living species including the human race have shown results of evolving and adapting at speed so I believe that it is possible for a living organism to be born on a planet without a sun but I also believe that this organism could have instant adaptation capability...so when this planet passes a sun/star the light could ...


2

I was just reading this article about metal asteroids. https://www.sciencenews.org/article/metal-asteroids-may-have-once-had-iron-spewing-volcanoes Metal asteroids are thought to be the exposed iron-rich cores of planetesimals >that suffered a catastrophic collision as the solar system was developing, before >they could grow into full-sized planets. The ...


7

A planet composed of 90% or more of metals is not that unlikely. The planet Mercury is composed of 70% metals with the majority of the lighter non-metals being concentrated in the relatively thin crust and the mantle. The crust and a lot of the mantle could be removed by an energetic collision with another large planetary body which could disrupt the ...


1

The mechanism for forming such a planet would be... unusual, to say the least. My best stab at something like this would be to have the planet in a binary star system, where one star is initially a smaller than Sol star, and the other is a star that could go supernova at some point - a supergiant perhaps. I picture that the planet started out as a massive, ...


1

This answer assumes an earthlike planet orbiting further out from its primary star. Effectively the planet will be locked in a permanent glacial epoch. Except it isn't. Overhead its northern hemisphere in the position corresponding to Earth's Pole Star is a pulsar. The solar system containing is bathed in the beam of the pulsar and the pulsar is closer ...


2

Yes it can. And Earth (and any planet) has! And even 2 more "axis", not just one There are such a phenomena wich is called "precession" and "nutation"


7

Yes, it can, but not in our 3D universe (but this is not tagged hard science anyway). It is perhaps better to think about rotation as "in a plane", instead of "around an axis". The plane of rotation has two dimensions - you cannot fit another independent plane of rotation into our three dimensional space, you lack one additional dimension. In a 4D space, ...


41

I asked this same question, on the physics stack. The answer is that a body can have only one axis of rotation. Below pasted is the link to the question and the answer I picked. https://physics.stackexchange.com/questions/322200/how-many-different-axes-of-rotation-can-coexist Q: I have questions about rotation. There is a sphere in space. I can ...


Top 50 recent answers are included