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Life organisms Earth examples and liquid water First of all within the ranges given, at temperatures lower than 150 °C and pressures greater than 10 bar water is liquid. Which also means that there is no runaway greenhouse effect under those conditions. Among the living organisms that live and reproduce in those conditions there are the following: ...


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With such temperatures you'd have another problem. At least, if your lifeforms are going to be anything like familiar biology. Complex proteines break down at those temperature similar to how the proteine in meat changes its properties when subjected to high temperature, giving it its brown rather than pink or red coloration. The only thing coming remotely ...


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Quite simply, it would not be possible. First of all, the only reason why the Earth does not have so much carbon dioxide is because of oxygen-producing life. If your planet has developed oxygen-producing life, it should already have converted most of the CO2 into oxygen. While oxygen-producing life may have evolved only recently on your planet, other aspects ...


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My first impression is that your two desires conflict with each other. 1) maximum temperature difference between light/dark sides and 2) gradual temperature change across a side. You may need to decide which is more important. There can be a temperature gradient, yes, but I'm assuming it would be small enough that you don't get the effect you're looking for....


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If there is a floating biome high up in the atmosphere that might produce a lot of oxygen and if there were limited numbers or no species of animals that oxygen might build up. At first anything that could be oxidized on the surface would be but eventually there would be little left to burn and high pressure oxygen would accumulate. Any falling matter ...


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I would suggest that the result would be something like Venus. You might start with a planet with 1atm Earth like atmosphere at 50km altitude and a similar composition down to the surface but that would not be stable. A much deeper atmosphere would absorb more heat and at such a high pressure and oxygen concentration, organic material on the surface would ...


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There are various methods out there, some more effective than others. Extract diluted oxygen. There's always air in water, its a given. You would generally extract the air shaking the water, causing the air to escape. That being said, this is not turning water into air, its just removing air that's already there. The Electrolysis Approach. Popular as a ...


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It seems very likely that Europa has a vast subsurface salt water ocean. Such an ocean would in all likelihood contain some nitrogen as dissolved gas, nitrate or ammonium salts or other more complex amides and amines. Such chemicals could be processed to release the nitrogen for use in a habitat. The exact method would depend on the form that nitrogen takes ...


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Cant you obtain a starting supply of oxygen from water itself via electrolisis? I dont know if its the best way to obtain it, but its a way. And you still have to get the rest of the gases to get the atmosphere. Once there, you can get oxygen and food from hidroponic farms (I guess they are not consuming ONLY local fauna)


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You have two questions to consider here: Can compounds required for blue atmospheres form in significant amounts on this planet, and are the temperatures right for them to condense and form clouds? I talked about atmospheric composition and color in an answer to a related question. Essentially, the question of whether or not compounds like ammonia and ...


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Rather than the atmosphere being a dark gas, you could have a dense, moist atmosphere that houses a lot of airborne microalgae. Earth's atmosphere contains some microalgae, at low as wellas high altitudes and in dry as well as wet climates, but not enough to visibly dim the sunlight. A thicker atmosphere could naturally hold more, especially if it has a high ...


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Cosmic soot. http://www.billcaid.com/2003/Fire2003/CedarFire2003l.html During the 2003 wildfires in Southern California, you could look right at the sun and see sunspots. People were calling radio stations to ask what was wrong with the sun. Not a "black gas" but airborne solid carbon particles that filled the air. In your world, these particles ...


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Nitrogen dioxide is a brown colored gas that seems to fit your scope. However mind that a dark gas would stop light coming from the star, while to increase the planet temperature you want to stop the energy leaving the planet, creating the so called greenhouse effect. Effective greenhouse gases are CO2, water and methane, which are transparent in the ...


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No sunburn risk. It's very dark at 50km. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Atmosphere_of_Venus#Upper_atmosphere_and_ionosphere this article tells us the opaque clouds extend up to 60km. In addition: https://wattsupwiththat.com/2019/10/03/svensmark-on-venus-mystery-of-the-unknown-uv-absorber-solved/ The atmosphere of Venus absorbs UVs. In addition, if ...


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Figure 4 in this paper would lead one to believe that the SO2 in the upper Venusian atmosphere does a poorer job of blocking the higher energy UV rays than Ozone on a per molecule basis. It's hard to say exactly how much SO2 there is compared to earth's Ozone layer though. But there is a thin ozone layer at Venus, and at 50 km, you're below the upper cloud ...


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this will cause disturbances in the Earth's magnetic field, It'll make it weak. so lot of radiation from the space will reach us means mutations in ADN that means a lot of cancer, There'll be also an electricity issues, The electricity grid may go down for years. We call this Coronal Mass Ejection


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Rayleigh Scattering is a universal physical process so it will always be involved when light passes through gases. Which is not to say it will always be the dominant determinant of the color of the sky. But in the case of an atmosphere composed of $SO_2$ that is doesn’t significantly absorb wavelengths shorter than 600 nm, Rayleigh scattering will dominate ...


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If you can't change the color of the room, change the color of the bulb. This may be a bit simplistic for what you are looking for, but if green clouds are impossible under the lighting conditions we are used to (good ol Sol), change the color of the star. That way you can still use plausible gaseous compositions, but they will be an entirely different ...


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fire needs three things fuel, oxygen and temperature ... so there would also be a temperature / humidity component to the excellent cycle willk describes. unless you want to use the planet's orbital eccentricity to regulate temperatures .... coinciding with stage 3 would be a drop in temperature and humidity but first the ash fertilisation kickstarts stage ...


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You need methane, ammonia and atmospheric temperatures of $∼$150 K. The color of a giant planet depends on the type of clouds dominating its upper atmosphere. These in turn depend on the temperature of the planet, as different molecules reach their gaseous phases at different temperatures. There are a few realistic potential cloud types on gas giants: ...


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While CAE Jones already got the inorganic chemistry settled, I'd like to propose an even more unlikely biological explanation. Let's use Sudarsky's gas giant classification and take a class two gas giant with water clouds. Now let's assume that life found it's way to this gas giant via panspermia and got stuck there. While cloud alge don't exist on Earth, ...


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Green atmospheres are weirdly challenging to construct. The closest in our Solar System seems to be Uranus, which is only slightly more green than Neptune's considerable blue. If you want a rich, lime or forest green, there might be problems, but perhaps taking Uranus's dose of green and pushing it as far as it can go before something breaks will be good ...


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How would they filter the ammonia from water and soil It would depend on the concentration of ammonia, other materials in the mix and the power available. Some form of molecular sieve to absorb the ammonia might work. Atmospheric gases would be pumped through a bed of media that absorbs ammonia, after a period of time the flow is cut off and the ammonia is ...


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