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3

No. The only way to keep opposite macroscopic charges separate is to have a dielectric in between. Without the dielectric the two charges would recombine, giving the nice zapp you get when you get an electrostatic discharge. Moreover, an atmosphere of only charged constituents would disperse even faster than what a neutral gas would do in the same condition, ...


1

Let's dive into the physics and see where that gets us. A the outset, I assert that I will make no attempt to estimate any ingredient to better than $\pm 10\%$ and the result may be off by a mall factor because of this. I use the subscript "Coel" to reference the planet you describe. You don't state the radius of your planet or its density, but ...


2

OK, we are going to Fermi Estimate this. TL;DR: about 1.5 Billion years. Mars can never be terraformed and left alone. That is, we can never "finish" terraforming it, and will always have to replenish its atmosphere. It is simply too small and there is too much of a problem with solar wind stripping its atmosphere away. As a result, whether it ...


4

TL;DR You should be able to get this sort of helium-dominated atmosphere to form naturally by exposing the planet to the proper levels of ultraviolet radiation from its star. By tweaking the orbital and physical parameters, you should be able to strip the planet of its hydrogen while retaining most of its helium. A planet with a cold, dense atmosphere might ...


4

Here‘s another alternative: the planet‘s solid core contains lots of reservoirs of frozen/condensed hydrogen, helium, nitrogen, etc. Perhaps the planet initially had no atmosphere and was just a ball of frozen rock until an alteration to its orbit (as you mentioned) or a change in the size of its star caused it to be heated up. At this point, frozen and ...


5

I think you are mixing two aspects here: the formation of the atmosphere and its enrichment in oxygen. In order to have free oxygen you need to have some process continuously producing it, else it will be depleted by the reaction with other species. And since you have hydrogen, you don't need much to have a lot of water. On Earth that process is called ...


0

I believe certain bugs can breath underwater by using surface tension to wrap an oxygen bubble around them. The bubble then exchanges carbon monoxide and oxygen with the surround water to give them effectively unlimited breathing capability (I don't pretend to understand this well, see https://phys.org/news/2008-07-insects-oxygen-underwater.html for more). ...


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A wizard did it Clarke's Third Law: Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic. It might be the case that a very advanced civilization terraformed the planet that way, maybe because they originally come from a place with a very thick atmosphere. The low gravity might be because the place was a spa, retirement home or kindergarten (...


1

Most of the interesting "weather" and dynamics in the lower atmosphere arise from convection. I think the link that was posted was mainly about how convection dominates in the lower atmosphere and and radiation effects dominate in the upper atmosphere, and wanted to see what the effect of would be if one artificially looked at the problem without ...


1

Tl;DR: I don't think that a radiative planetary atmosphere is possible. It seems unlikely to meet the key requirements of surface gravity, opacity and temperature that would ensure that radiation would dominate over convection. We can answer the question of whether radiation or convection dominates energy transport by taking a cue from stellar astrophysics. ...


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