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As big as a coconut crab. The arthropod body is incredibly successful and allows for very fast and agile creatures. The drawback of it is that, due to how it feeds oxygen to their tissues (relying heavily on diffusion), their growth is closely tied to the amount of oxygen in the air. The coconut crab is considered the largest any land arthropod can grow in ...


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Use hand wavy alien technology maybe, don't explain it as such if it doesn't fit the theme of the book. Use weird force fields and energy sources that the hunters gatherers think is magical spirits transporting them to a different realm but eventually you reveal to the readers it's aliens


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You might want to read Off on a Comet by Jules Verne. In this story, a comet impacts the earth, and carries away a small band of voyagers, who later get returned to earth the same way. I think the transfer mechanism is implausible. Apart from that, it makes for a good story.


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If you want to make this work, even though it's very unlikely, here are a couple things you can do: Make the cavern system out of an extremely dense, non-porous, and contiguous rock Make it so that when this rock is ejected into space, it is spinning rapidly. This causes internal artificial gravity, although for this to work, the rock needs to have an ...


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As you have already seen, the answer to your question, as originally posed, is a big, fat "no". Do you have the scope for a rather long story or even series or stories? If so, why not combine some of the alternatives suggested with an overarching "discovery" narrative: The planet is under asteroid bombardment in advance of the big, big ...


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It is not unheard of. Caddisfly larve, hermit crabs and some deepsea creatures decorate and protect themselves with debris. It is a little stretch, but it might be possible that a larger land creature starts adding it to his fur/slimy exterior as they don't need to grow the exterior themselves. They eventually lose the fur if any, relying only on the stones ...


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Most of these are features of a lot of big animals so that's nice. This is far enough from any species I know of that you've got a lot of free-rain on what vertebrate to evolve from, just give it plenty of time. The fastest paths would probably be mammals and theropods (the group of dinosaurs that includes birds). I do have a couple of concerns: Rocks on ...


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As shown here, it won't work all that well. To be launched into space you need a massive impact. An impact smaller than the KT impact that wiped out the dinosaurs would not be sufficient to launch ejecta beyond Earth's orbit. And even the KT impact did not produce all that much ejecta that escaped Earth's gravity. Lunar scientists expect to find traces of ...


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To answer the original question: No, asteroid impacts could not enable human interplanetary travel. The acceleration involved at each end is too great for anything other than bacteria to survive, not to mention the extended journey through the cold and dark of space. Here is a less implausible scenario: Instead of an impact, there is a near miss between two ...


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Umm ... Frame Challenge Basically you have just described ostriches. By the time they have done all this evolving, they won't look anything like penguins anymore. They will in fact look like this. https://images.wordseye.com/ws-image-db/2016-6-2/51315.jpg


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Alzheimer's is characterized by the degeneration of gray matter (the outermost layer of your brain); so, by the time you get that far, those will be the symptoms you observe... that said, our behaviors are not guided by our brain alone. While our brain is where the thinking happens, most of what we feel comes from our endocrine system. You Adrenal glands ...


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Closest real neurological disorder to the state of being an eldritch entity? There are some animals that have become eldritch matter, and when they do they survive (...) Ok, so far so good. (...), and become and eldritch entity, a creature that defies the laws of physics but in return has no neurological function because their neurons are not able to be ...


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Nobody has yet mentioned oxygen. In normal air that's 20% oxygen, we humans breath about 11 cubic meters of air a day each. With no sunlight, there will be no photosynthesis to convert CO2 back into O2 (or, of course, to be the bottom layer of the food web). So all the oxygen they breathe will need to be in the cave at the start. Even if you get past all ...


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Surprising, haven't seen this mentioned yet: After a few months, much more certainly a few millennia, the entire rock is going to be at a temperature of only a few Kelvin. All other considerations aside, I doubt your cavemen will have much success keeping it any warmer. Even if they could somehow build fires (& not die of carbon monoxide poisoning, or ...


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I'm going to assume that, since the rest of the body is Eldritch Matter, the rest of the life functions are somehow intact and the brain can survive in its current configuration. Neurodegenerative diseases (ND) are typically categorized by the damage to the brain, but usually not in the way we're discussing here. As opposed to actually destroying and ...


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Although a conventional interstellar travel is unlikely, due the the crushing forces of the impact, there may be a potential to involve wormholes and some strange physics. If the wormhole is the gravitational cause of the asteroid, or it just manages to rapture some poor folk in caves and eject them conveniently on another world there may be something to ...


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You can actually do an experiment to verify what would happen. All you need is a modern artillery piece, say for example the US155mm M109A7 mechanized artillery tube. Then you design a 'special' heavily reinforced hollow artillery round (so it doesn't break up upon firing or impact) that can be unscrewed to allow access to the hollow core. Into this core you ...


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Your best bet would be monitor lizards. They are strong enough to hold the weight of many men and have a good lizard-like grip, even on relatively smooth rock surfaces. Here is a link that refers to a legend on how generals used these lizards to scale fort walls. I am not sure if these legends have been verified till date. Monitor lizards are kept as pets, ...


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Giant Squirrels! Normal squirrels are mammals, intelligent and trainable. No need to bite through rock. Train them to carry a thin cord, loop it and bring it back down. Attach a rope and haul it up. Alternatively breed giant squirrels! They would be excellent climbers and, with tungsten tooth caps could even chew through rock. You doubt their ability to ...


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First of all radiowaves are electromagnetic waves, so you're looking at contraptions more like eyes, that can receive electromagnetic waves, rather than ears, which sense vibration. Or it can basically just be a walkie-talkie duck-taped on to its head, and if that's the case just google how those work and replicate it. An organism's brain can interpret that ...


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How about air breathing octopi? Certainly intelligent enough to be trained, although they strike me as too intelligent to want to do a task like this a lot. The suckers and flexible arms give them lots of gripping power.


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Unless you're writing in the Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy universe and can employ a passing side effect of the Heart of Gold's Infinite Improbability Drive, I would employ an alien intervention instead. Unless your hunter gatherers are Tardigrades, then you should be good.


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Would they have to evolve to tune out background radiation? Consider that your eyes are not sensitive to all wavelengths of the electromagnetic spectrum. And also consider how your brains is able to pick out sounds and tune out background noise from your ears through processing.


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Electric eels The electric organs create strong and weak electric charges, which are utilized for defense, hunting, communication and navigation. https://nationalzoo.si.edu/animals/electric-eel I see no reason why an animal - even a land animal - could not evolve from an eel-like ancestor. Maybe they originally communicated underwater but as they evolved ...


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The affected person would die long before neurodegeneration begins. The human body depends on the harmonious interaction of many different complex systems and intricate organs. If the lower portion of the human body is affected before their brain, many of these vital processes would quickly cease to function, resulting in death. Take the circulatory system, ...


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Here are a few ideas: Inducing copulation. A certain species of coral releases large amounts of sperm and eggs on a night when the moon is brightest. Perhaps your predator preys on a species that is induced to mate by the full moon. By imitating the full moon (with its face), your predator fools its prey into coming out of hiding. Camouflage. (This idea ...


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Ancient Civilization Propoganda Let's think about this logically. If the moon looks exactly like a predator, that means that something or someone made it look like the predator, assuming we rule out random chance. Now, given that the predator is native to the planet, that means that someone from the planet did it, which in turn suggests that there was an ...


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Maybe, but a few things to consider Really big scavengers can be highly-susceptible to extinction. So make sure that there's plenty of food in your world to go around. The Short-Faced Bear is an excellent example of this. They were the biggest, scariest scavenger running around and then the climate changed and bam they're extinct. This is why obligate ...


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Artificial Selection This is the easiest solution. Humans kinda love doing sucky things to dog bodies, maybe the same people who thought it'd be cute to make pugs thought dogs walking around on 2 legs was cute too. There are some dogs that do this but they're usually abused. It's really bad for them but over the years it might become more inline with ...


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Lots of great problems with this have been mentioned already, but I'll add a couple more: Rock Porosity Caves generally form in pretty porous rocks (that's how all the water got in to form it in the first place). You can bet that the vacuum of space will suck all the air out pretty fast. Not Enough People and/or Food I'm seeing different estimates but you'd ...


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While the bite-through-the-rock part might be a bit implausible, I find the premise completely plausible. Dune had chairdogs. We use service animals today to assist the blind. Navies have used marine mammals for various purposes (like dolphins for mine detection). Frankly, I could easily believe such a creature being a beloved companion - perhaps a primate ...


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ALIEN ABDUCTION (circa 20,000 BCE): The only way this scenario works that I can see is if there is an intervening intelligently designed space traveller involved transporting the people. It could certainly LOOK like this to the people in the cave; if they understood enough of it to make cave drawings, passing on the story to ancestors, then this could be ...


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Unfortunately, such a plan would be doomed from the start. It's not enough to simply reach escape velocity while on Earth's surface, because Earth has an atmosphere that will quickly slow you back down again. Rockets counteract this with continual thrust, but for a system with a single impulse - such as a space gun or being knocked into space by an impact - ...


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The rocks that ceiled the hunter gathers in the cave for many generations are ejected from the entrance to the cave when the rock crashes into the planet, allowing the hunter gatherers to leave the cave, and colonize the planet. Would this situation be possible? Very likely not at all, for a series of reasons: First: The large chunk of rock with a cave ...


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Monkey around with it: I'm taking inspiration from the comments, and saying that it's less of a jump to have some sort of primate, like a baboon or relative of a gorilla, evolve size, superficial appearance and new body proportions to fit your model than it is to reinvent the wheel and shift all these factors in a wolf. Especially with the tool and ...


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How are these different to baboons? Baboons may not be there with the tool use and are not canines, but they look it.


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Why Jaws when you can just Stick it? Sure, a lizard of some sort would be cool, but various wall materials could break teeth and cause all kinds of other problems. What if your critter happens to hit the wall backed by a steel I beam or something? Anything with the bite strength to manage something like that, or granite, or marble, is going to be to big ...


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You're Looking for Mutations in the HOX Genes These genes regulate the placement of limbs. They are part of the family of homeobox genes that regulates our shape (humans have around 200 of them). A virus could have introduced a mutation into an entire sick pack, causing malformed limbs. These limbs are well-suited for bi-pedal walking. The deformity is ...


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is it realistic to make an animal which can bite through rock and hold the grip with their jaws realistic? Biting through any rock is highly unrealistic. Granite is a well known problematic rock to be pierced, even for machinery with no biological limitations. If you really want something that grips on almost any material, you are better off going in the ...


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Decreasing temperatures in Canada (pretty much) Big creatures are selected when the weather is cold. (Basically, because you have more meat behind each surface unit, meaning less thermal energy lost per unit of mass. Mammoth-style.) Long limbs are nice either when you need to run fast (because you hunt or are hunted), or on very rocky/unequal surfaces. Also ...


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Sure! Could easily evolve from the only slightly shorter Gigantopithecus. You don't ask for a reality check, but in all honesty, 1 mph is pretty slow. Though you could mix in a bit of sloth for good measure, at about 125 feet per day. Not much of an ambush predator, unless your beasty starts its ambush last week. On the other hand...


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Yes, but make them mammals. Assume they are simply a species of large bat with human-like faces and the rest of it falls into place. Just as flying foxes have a surprisingly fox-like faces, these have human features. The story about having an attractive song is is a complete blind. What the sirens really do is wait for dark or bad weather (because bats are ...


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Your description immediately made me think of the harpies. So it would not seem entirely out of the picture to imagine these sirens of yours being an evolution of the "harpy eagle" a species that recalls the human face in an almost disturbing way, moreover, given its size, it would not detach too much from the size you mention. I also don't believe ...


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Ready for the absurd? Lets just take a human as a starting frame. The human has a special arm that can envelope the whole stick, with the exception of the club head. In this appendage are a ton of sensor nerves and some fly trap facet eyes here and there, that aid in not just feeling, but knowing how hard you swing and where you hit the ball. Aided by the ...


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Increasing the distance between the waist and shoulders and increasing the muscle strength and response speed would lengthen the golfer's drive. A larger cerebellum with better muscle nerve control would allow for greater accuracy in long shots. Improved eyesight might help the golfer by allowing them to see small particles carried by the wind, granting them ...


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I will try to be as brief as possible! Insect farms could be made. Similar to these in China and south east Asia. Same goes goes for dogs and cats, similar to the food in Vietnam and the two Koreas. Although feeding for the dogs and felines will be required. Therefore, these two would be a luxury food. Genetically engineered plants will be a must if you want ...


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It depends on the cause... You can find all sorts of info all over the interwebs on sensory nerves. I could point you to a few, but so could a number of folks on this site. In a nutshell, nociception is different from pressure sensation, and in the absence of the former you'll probably mostly get input from the latter. ...but in my experience, not much I'...


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It would feel how it feels anyway except not accompanied by pain If you punch yourself increasingly hard to the point where it is not yet painful, that would be the sensation felt by someone with no pain receptors. Try it! The same is true for 1 - 6, except that major injuries would cause faintness and shock due to sudden blood loss. The question about ...


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This is a real condition. Search for a guy named Steve Pete. The upshot is, it’s not good. You can really hurt yourself and not even know it. That’s pretty much the answer to every question you asked.


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Plants (and fungi which you missed) are the most important part of the food chain as far as multi-cellular macro-scale organisms are concerned. You cannot claim such widespread destruction of the food chain if plants are still there. Many animals would die but with plants and insects around, the basis of the food chain itself would still be there. Omnivores, ...


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