New answers tagged

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Scurvy and "Vitamin H" and blood pressure reduction from Sunlight Whether it's the immune cells, particular strands of DNA or the exact composition... Human blood contains something lacking in other species. Examples exist elsewhere of spieces that contain something others don't... Lobsters famously contain stuff that are useful all around the ...


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Your planet sized creature lives in a gas giant. https://www.universetoday.com/22710/jupiter-compared-to-earth/ Your creature is not the mass of a planet but it is the size of a planet. See that red thing on Jupiter? That is one. The planet beast floats in a gas giant, accumulating energy and resources, building its body. Perhaps it has organs to ...


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Those guys have aquagenic urticaria (think water allergy). They can kngest regular water, but it will harm them. Over time the harm builds up. Mammalian blood, for some reason, does not trigger the allergic response. So it is the only safe thing for them to drink if they want to stay hydrated. Properly hydrated vampires will drink blood every day, not just ...


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T Cells A less fantastic version of DWKraus’s excellent answer. Your vampires have evolved a symbiotic relationship with humankind. Vampires can produce their own antibody-crafting B-cells, and can produce their own antigen-library T-cells, but vampire T-cells have evolved to lose the ability to recognize new antigens. Vampires drinking a small amount of ...


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Best I can think of is DNA. You said it yourself that your vampires feed mostly on the blood of other animals much like a vampire bat, but vampire bats are in simply for the nutrients in the blood (which aren't all that many, requiring the animal to feed regularly and one of the reasons they'll die if they go longer than 3 days without a proper blood meal), ...


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Immunology: The need for human blood is not, really, about food. It's about antibodies. The vampire's immune systems have come to function in a completely different way from human immune systems. This has allowed them to enter into a symbiotic relationship with several bacteria that block cancers, promote muscle oxidation at amazing levels, allow stem cells ...


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I don´t know if this will count but if your living planet is simple enough, the answer can be yes. Think in the Physarum polycephalum or other species of the same family and add the capacities to do the Photosynthesis and to avoid the square cube law you can add the capacity to strategy suicide the old cells that are under the surface of the "planet&...


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Short answer yes, but it depends a lot on your wording "planet sized". For example both the glass in my window, and the spider web in front of it, are "window sized"..... I think you can see where I'm going with this. You can't have the planet sized entity literally be solid and planet sized, for reasons other answers explain. But it ...


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Spiders, like many other limbed ecdysozoa (invertebrates that shed their cuticle), have claws at the end of their legs. In spiders, there are 2-3 of them. While they are not the most dextrous, it isn't ridiculous for them to be jointed in such a way that would allow them to be used as fingers


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There will be many issues with a "living planet" sized organism, with gravity being the largest hurdle. If the planet has a surface gravity similar to our Earth, then the structure of the creature has to support a truly incomprehensible weight. The pressures involved on Earth results in magma, and its hard to imagine a life-form that incorporates ...


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Short answer, no. Even if the creature is idle it would need huge amounts of food/energy for it to even exist. Considering space is mostly just large amounts of gaps between systems with nothing in it, the creature would need an efficient way of getting good amounts of food and if they have a heart and something lung-like it would imply thos are constantly ...


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Scientifically, no, that's not possible. According to National Geography, the most massive terrestrial planet ever found so far is TOI-849b, which has a Mass of 40 Earths. (Normally, planets this massive should be gas giants, but this monster defies any theories scientiests currently known.) But, "size" is NOT the key as to how big the creatures ...


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Yes, but... ... we use industrial processes for a reason. Production, recycling, and manufacture boil down into "synthesis" and "extraction", and are different areas, so we'll examine them individually. Ultimately, it's best to have both playing to their strengths. Synthesising (from provided material) Let's look at making a conventional ...


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You would just see different things through each eye, one would see the face, the other would see the eye. It would be bizarre, not denying that, but it is easy to explain.


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how long would it take said population to develop fully into their own ethnicity, both in appearance and in genetics? Somewhere around a few thousand years to ten thousand years. If you simply pick any Old World population 10k years ago and keep it isolated, you're almost guaranteed to end up with distinctive one by nowadays standard. Why? Because nowadays ...


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Octopus Speculative evolution is not necessary, the octopus is already a really good candidate for what you are describing. An octopus is already one of the most intelligent creatures on Earth. Their capacity for making complex plans closely rivals that of humans, and even though they are not tool users by nature, they are very good at manipulating human ...


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if an enchantment is given to an entire animal, why not have more than one? my idea is basically that a group of species with different specialized features became mutualists so as to allow simultaneous use of each other's features. an example it might have evolved from is the portuguese mano'war, which is a set of many different mutualistic species who work ...


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In truth modern science cannot not really answer this. Actually, it probably could, but… because of issues that are grounded in politics, racial debates, and the fears of indigenous people in the Americas (North & South), science has not been able to make its best attempt at solving the wide spread, and very hotly debated question that you ask. Remains ...


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There are plenty of good answers already, so I will just provide some additional information on the subject. It is not possible to give you a reliable estimate because the speed of cultural homogenization depends on several different factors. Some of the most important are: Diversity of the original group (do you have dominant ethnic or cultural subgroups? ...


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I upvoted @DWKraus' answer, you should too, but I want to add more insight. Answer: 30 Seconds eth·nic·i·ty (/eTHˈnisədē/) noun: ethnicity; plural noun: ethnicities • The fact or state of belonging to a social group that has a common national or cultural tradition. (Source: Oxford Languages) Your group of refugees met that definition the moment they became ...


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They would not regard themselves as an ethnic group. They would regard themselves as basically, a group, and those outside are the outsiders. For instance, in 19th century France, villagers would refer to a bride who came from outside -- meaning another village. This group comes with a natural regard for themselves as a group, since they can easily ...


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I don't think there is a 100% clear cutoff line, because ethnicity is much more of a social distinction than a physical one. Is Anglo-saxon a different ethnicity from white european? Is Scottish an ethnicity separate from anglo-saxon? Is lowland scottish separate from highland scottish? Are American Scots a separate ethnicity from Scots living in ...


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Ethnicity is an Idea first, Biology a distant second: There is a similar question HERE The problem with race and ethnicity is that the divisions are largely cosmetic. That is to say, all you need is for your group to LOOK different from the surrounding people, and they are considered different. If you have a distinctive feature, like red hair or a funny nose,...


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Let us assume "ethnic group" means they can be distinguished as that group on sight. Let us start with something harmless and spectacular like the methemoglobinema of the Blue Fugates. https://dnascience.plos.org/2016/09/22/finding-the-famous-painting-of-the-blue-people-of-kentucky/ Let us assume that the gene conferring the appearance is ...


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Optical synapse The synapse is still an important step in the signal process, allowing for a lot of information modification. To keep this information modification, I would propose an optic synapse. The idea is simple. instead of chemicals, light is shone via a bioluminant lamp in the synapse gap. On the other end, photo-receptors will get agitated, ...


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So, that isn't very realistic or survivable. The spine contains the spinal cord and is connected to the central nervous system, it is also connected to the base of the skull. Ripping out a person's skeleton (besides killing them automatically), would leave them paralyzed and likely with irreparable brain damage since part of the brain stem (which is ...


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Take a milk cow, bred and selected over the years to continuously produce milk, out of a farm and release it in the wild with other of her kind. What will happen? Very likely the cows will die if there is nobody to milk them out. And even if milking them was not an issue, continuously producing milk would put them at severe disadvantage against the other ...


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Bast fibers I spin yarn, so I have some experience with this subject, or at least with the articles on this subject. One of the most common ways to spin fibers from plants is to ret them (controlled rotting that removes the unspinnable portions and softens the phloem into bast fibers), comb them (on a hackle or other combs), then spin them “wet” (using water ...


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King, I feel obliged to point out that the bright white suit you are wearing is pure polyester made from petrochemicals that were found underground in a temperate climate. Those nylon baggies with the rocket ships that you wear as underwear were also made from petrochemicals found underground. But maybe the medievals could not make polyester. Instead I ...


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Magic Eating Flesh Parasite. (Inspired by Charlie's answer.) The organism began as a colony of bacteria that eats ambient chaos energy. The same way plants feed off ambient C02 in the atmosphere. Bacteria can evolve much faster than macro-organisms to take advantage of a new food source. Colonies of this bacteria take the form of a mould in highly magical ...


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There's a lot of options here but it sounds like you wants something farmable. Here's a few that I found around the internet and while some would need you to stretch your imagination others wouldn't. Fermented Wine Joe is a farmer who many considered mad but when he started burying red wine under the ground many people started avoiding him. Some of the kids ...


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The way I allways imagined succubi feeding is they produce a cocktail of narcotics and aphrodisiacs that cause their prey to begin to dedicate all of their bodily functions to semen production. The semen that a man produces while under the effects of a succubi's toxin will be fortified with vitamins and other nutrients that the succubus needs to survive. So ...


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But the innovative people of Mars realized that if you could isolate the effect of a medication to a particular tissue How could this work? One possible way is to develop a "bacteriophage virus-like" vector, composed of a large capsid and a specific, targetable "mouth". There is an instructive video here. The key factor here is that ...


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While it sounds like I am tearing this question apart by making 3 seperate frame challenges, I should start by saying I actually really like it as a question. It contains many common pitfalls that that most people miss because they seem so far fetched or counter intuitive. Frame Challenge #1: This Tech Already Exists ...nanotech no. We have real nanobots ...


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Enhance the body's own defenses and healing mechanisms. (By way of a slight frame-challenge) Most medicine in the west has focused on interventions - in the case of antibiotics, antivirals, anti-fungals - to kill the disease, or perform surgery to clear a blockage or remove troublesome growths. Indeed the majority of (non surgical) cancer treatments have ...


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mRNA vaccines. This is amazing tech! It is now. Vaccines we are getting use it for only the crudest application - display of a nonfunctional foreign protein to produce an immune response. But it could do so much more. https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/vaccines/different-vaccines/mrna.html A Closer Look at How COVID-19 mRNA Vaccines Work COVID-19 ...


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There are four approaches I could suggest. Affinity Some substances have an affinity to specific organs, e.g. iodine with the thyroid. By utilizing this you can design a medication that only has the desired effect once it reaches a threshold concentration. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6314433/ Localised deposition. Physically inserting ...


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You can use the same approach certain virus use to attack only certain tissues: for example the rabies virus attacks brain cells, while the flu virus attacks only epithelial cells and so on. It all depends on specific surface receptors expressed only by your target cells, which can be used as docking points. If I remember correctly such an approach was ...


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The best way to beat the tyranny of the square-cube law is to invest in fractal-based organs, distribution systems, and structures. A high degree of fractality(known as the fractal dimension) can essentially make a 1D, 2D, or 3D system behave as if it were of a higher dimension than it actually is. An example of such a system is your lungs. They depend on ...


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"...What's the next part of the body most vulnerable to lethal damage from a fall...?" All the rest of it! True story, and please forgive the gory details: When I was a kid I saw what turned out to be the aftermath of someone committing suicide by jumping out the window of a tall building. The person had hit a pipe just before hitting the ground. ...


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How about this: Four arms. The forward arms will probably be stronger. They're carrying the head. The pelvis is smaller so that arms can take the weight. The neck is longer so the head can look ahead. Make the wrists more muscular so they can withstand the pounding, and make the feet/hands padded on the bottom so they can take the grinding. p.s You just ...


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Could they run underwater, if they are dense enough, yes Will they be any faster than hippo, no. the drag water produces means the length of the limbs becomes largely irrelevant to speed. you need a lot of muscle and leverage to push through water with any speed. Worse the limbs experience a lot of drag as well, so a long thin leg may actually end up moving ...


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Horses can already do it if their heads stick out The following video shows a horse walking along the bottom and then swimming even faster when the water gets deeper. It wouldn't take much in the way of evolution for horses to develop higher density and to learn to hold their breath. Horse seen walking and swimming from underwater


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Crabs do ok running underwater. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eWmSGxAvwp0 This animal has long slim legs like a crab. Ghost crabs are lightning fast on land. This one is making pretty good time, moving along the bottom underwater. I am sure it is helped by the fact that it does not have density-lowering air filled spaces inside as we landlubbers are ...


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Did you know that orcas have a taste for moose? I'll let you take some time to digest that morsel of information. And no, I am not making this up. Now that I got your attention: moose can swim at 6 mph, which is about Michael Phelps's top speed underwater. The difference being that moose, despite never getting the gold in the Olympics[citation needed], can ...


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Goodbye Limbs, Hello Water ... though they may be back if the brain can handwave drug-production and has a good diet. You'll have to play with your parameters, but mushrooms be converted to a leather-like substance under the right circumstances. This is produced today and marketed as "vegan leather". Forming this into a glider, you might be able to ...


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Whether or not a creature can run on the riverbed or sea floor has far more to do with its density than its shape or size. Hippos are extremely dense. If your creature was equally dense, it should be able to run on the bottom like a hippo.


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You're dead anyway I was going to calculate the parachute area required for base jumping with that mass, but then it came to me that mycelium is not a proper fabric for this. So your best bet would be to mushify all soft tissue for cushion, but then you will have no circulation and as such will be brain dead for want of oxygen. I think the death by impact ...


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Deceleration injuries of the heart and aorta. These are common injuries in falls and other impact trauma. Fatal falls from a height: The use of mathematical models to estimate the height of fall from the injuries sustained Interestingly, almost 50% showed a combination of head, thoracic and abdominal injuries, with severe or disruptive head injuries being ...


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There is no need for hinges and latches at this stage of technical development. A much more efficient approach would be building mudhuts and weaving rags for cover window and door openings. Rags can be glued or partially embedded into mud during the hut construction. Use poop-bricks for furniture inside. That would help with brick softening/crumbling and ...


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