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10 votes

How would the "Hardness vs Toughness" dynamic of gems apply if it were possible to make shields out of them?

There are several issues when designing a shield. What is a shield? It is something that protects you against some incoming weapon. It can do that by deflecting the weapon, by absorbing it, or by ...
Richard Kirk's user avatar
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7 votes

How would the "Hardness vs Toughness" dynamic of gems apply if it were possible to make shields out of them?

Would the calculus change if we went from medieval weaponry to say, cannons or modern firearms? Yes. Allow me to introduce Composite Armor - Paraphrasing - but my understanding is that you have ...
TheDemonLord's user avatar
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19 votes
Accepted

How would the "Hardness vs Toughness" dynamic of gems apply if it were possible to make shields out of them?

Toughness is more important in a shield Toughness refers to the amount of energy necessary to deform a material. A tougher material will be able to absorb harder blows without being damaged, and if it ...
Shawn O'Neil's user avatar
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2 votes

Could Mermaids Tear a Warship's Planking?

This is a frame challenge. Captain Nyx was losing her mind already. This couldn't be happening again! Why those damn fish-folk couldn't leave her alone?! The first raid had Nyx replace the entirety ...
Mermaker's user avatar
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1 vote

Could Mermaids Tear a Warship's Planking?

The main problem with this idea is that, barring unusual circumstances, wooden ships do not sink all that well. You can riddle a wooden ship with holes (this is what cannonballs used to do) and will ...
Going Durden's user avatar
0 votes

Could Mermaids Tear a Warship's Planking?

The sealife itself can slow down a ship to a near standstill via biofouling. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Biofouling So your aquarians appear, seed the ship with growth, the ship halts, the growth ...
Pica's user avatar
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6 votes

Could Mermaids Tear a Warship's Planking?

Frame challenge - Why bother with a risky anchor and trying to rip a piece of planking out? Simply ram the boat! Rams on boats (usually oar powered rather than sail) have been used since antiquity to ...
bob1's user avatar
  • 163
5 votes

Could Mermaids Tear a Warship's Planking?

Not at all feasible The proposed plan has two huge, somewhat interconnected problems. Big ships stay in deep water, with "age of sail" vessels travelling on courses that are not predictable ...
KerrAvon2055's user avatar
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7 votes

Could Mermaids Tear a Warship's Planking?

It's not hard to sabotage a ship. Just jam its rudder and prevent the sailors from fixing it. They will be at your complete mercy. Humans would be as great at repelling a mermaid attack as fishes are ...
alamar's user avatar
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22 votes

Could Mermaids Tear a Warship's Planking?

Seems a lot of work just to capture a ship which is now sinking. There's not much point asking them to surrender in a sinking ship unless you want them in boats and the ship at the bottom of the sea ...
Kilisi's user avatar
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17 votes
Accepted

Could Mermaids Tear a Warship's Planking?

My take on this problem - discounting the problems of availability of metal tools to merfolk - is that there are going to be lots of problems with this approach and probably better ways to achieve ...
Monty Wild's user avatar
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1 vote

If our universe were a simulation, what could a bug look like?

Stuff on Rails Preamble When programming videogames or simulations that follow rules there are mainly three ways to program the motion of objects, regarding complexity Very complex movement: things ...
The Square-Cube Law's user avatar
1 vote

If our universe were a simulation, what could a bug look like?

It is impossible to answer this question by definition. The definition of a bug is the inability to access an intended state of the program. Because we have no way to determine the intent of the ...
Purple P's user avatar
  • 195
-1 votes

What's the smallest change to physics required to allow magic?

All the laws of the physics (or, the last of the nature) are eternal: they work always as expected. However, there are also laws which work only once. That is magic.
Gray Sheep's user avatar
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