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1

Think 'fractals'. The coastline paradox is the counterintuitive observation that the coastline of a landmass does not have a well-defined length. This results from the fractal curve-like properties of coastlines, i.e., the fact that a coastline typically has a fractal dimension (which in fact makes the notion of length inapplicable). The first recorded ...


2

I live in a coastal community and I strongly suggest researching coast lines in areas that have a similar climate to your location. The weather will affect the currents and tides which will affect the shape of the coast line, etc. The climate will affect the marine life, which will dictate which type of sand, etc will be on the coast line. The makeup of any ...


6

The main factors are the composition of the local soil, the land slope, idrography (mainly how much silt is being dumped seaward by the rivers), climate and time. Then you must consider the characteristics of the tides and currents (influenced by the land slope but also by the wider body of water's shape and orientation). No significant tides, and erosion ...


14

Local orography and currents are what mostly determine how a coast look like. Orography: the local slope of the terrain will influence how the land/water interface will look like, if you will have fjords or a straight coast line. A steeper slope will make deposition of sediments more difficult, a more gentle slope will make it easier. Currents: moving the ...


9

Copy Earth. You are making it up! Unless you have some constraints as regards location, you can have their environment be what you want it to be to make your story good. Even better, you can imagine somewhere on Earth that is like where they are and just lift real geographical information off the map. Then you can figure out there comings and goings on a ...


4

Orbital mechanics Every N days, the planet has considerable force applied by some external process. For example a conjunction of the sun and 2 moons such that peak tides and peak stress is applied to the planet. This stress isn't enough to rip the planet apart, its direct force is barely detectable without tools, but it is enough to trigger low-intensity ...


1

Make it a geyser. Like Waimangu Geyser but with a period of 365 days instead of 1.5. That would take a remarkably large underground chamber (illustration), one about 200 times larger volume than Waimangu so maybe 6 times larger in every direction. Depending on your world you might be able to propose some unusual geology that could support such an ...


3

Your world ocean will be freshwater. https://oceanservice.noaa.gov/facts/whysalty.html#:~:text=Salt%20in%20the%20ocean%20comes,acidic%2C%20so%20it%20erodes%20rocks. Salt in the ocean comes from two sources: runoff from the land and openings in the seafloor. Rocks on land are the major source of salts dissolved in seawater. Rainwater that falls on land is ...


1

Your magical portals filter out fish, algae, seaweed, etc., but not salt or other dissolved minerals. Consequently the salt vanishes with the water. This produces lands much less salty than that caused by evaporation. For residual salt, have it rain.


8

Rain. Water that evaporates and precipitates is salt free. Most of Florida was under the sea just a few million years ago. Given the geologic time scale you've proposed, you really don't have a problem with this. The land won't be substantially different from some land on Earth. (You won't be winning any awards for your signature fjords though - no ...


0

I'm going to assume that the humans, animals & plants survive beyond the initial transferal. Realistically, I think as others have said, your planet is going to end up a salty wasteland apart from the highlands that may already have had some native plant life or at least be somewhat amenable to terrestrial imports. At best, I think your human imports may ...


1

They may discover that their planet was a waterworld once a little earlier. Some archeological research could be an evidence. For example if they constantly find ancient marine animals in the center of a big continent that might be a clue. And if we take human civilisation, wide archeological studies had started on our planet in 19th century, long before we ...


4

Sterile and dead. Without ample topsoil and plants whisked in with those animals, your planet would be a windswept desert as they quickly die off, leaving virtually no trace after a few years of aeolian erosion and burial. With topsoil and plants you'd almost certainly get the same result, just a few years (maybe a decade) later: the subsurface would be ...


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