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You don't use explosive bullets to overcome armor You can make explosive bullets quite easily, Sodium/Potassium bullets are a really good example that can be quite devastating against soft tissue... but that is not what you are asking. As you can see in this video, they can make a watermelon explode quite spectacularly, but when it comes to penetration, ...


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Chlorine+Brake Fluid It's relatively easy, although I would suggest against glass for the reason that glass has a likelihood of breaking on the user. The two chemicals that I listed are common, not overly dangerous, and have a strong low-explosive reaction when mixed, without an ignition source. A low explosive might be just what your story needs, since low ...


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Sounds like an interesting setting! But I would like to raise some points... First off, explosive rounds like you're suggesting are an incredibly dangerous and unreliable weapon. If they shatter on impact, what happens if you trip and land on your ammo belt? Second off: What about Poison? We don't poison rounds much because the coating is unlikely to survive ...


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Answers and thoughts on your weapons: I think you are looking for contact explosives which explode on impact. No glass bullet needed. Just add old-fashioned metal casings (think pineapple-type 'defensive' grenades). A triggering fuse (possible but not developed with advanced alchemy) can guarantee a detonation for the less sensitive types, but otherwise ...


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Just for the sake of linking this article, I'd suggest Chlorine Trifluoride, which is an utterly horrible compound from the very depths of some explosive reactive hell. However, I think that it might set the glass on fire, so containing it in glass bullets is probably a no-go. When it comes to general explosives, the usual formula is cram nitrogens onto the ...


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Subcutaneous pigment absorption: AKA tattoos People turn their skin green all the time in real life through the application of tattooing. These pigments are non-toxic but can remain under the skin for a lifetime. So, when we consider potion making, the fumes of the potions may work like a chemical peel meets dye job, opening up pores indiscriminately ...


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Just as exposure to the sun will dark skin, exposure to magic will react with it. If you brew only one kind of potion, the reaction will be predicted on that and be very ugly. Strength, for instance, will make your skin like steel, ruining your sense of touch and making motion difficult. But, for some reason, if you brew many different kinds, the result ...


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How can we explain why witches brewing potions gain green skin? Brewing a bunch of big batch potions exposes you to some nasty vapors. The cauldrons must be stirred constantly and ingredients added precisely, so there is no way around this. Perhaps one of the main ingredients in the base potions contains a lot of sulfur and the reactions frequently form ...


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Not really It is not difficult to produce simple irritants or ingestible poisons. It is much more difficult to produce truly deadly airborne substances in sufficient quantities. Even the simplest agents, like mustard gas, phosgene or hydrocyanic acid require a chemical industry that is not available until the industrial age. A crafty chemist might be able to ...


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Well, to start with, there is already some evidence of chemical warfare in the ancient Roman era. Burning sulfur and bitumen will create a deadly gas that was used by the Persians in 256 CE. https://knowledgenuts.com/2014/02/19/chemical-weapons-got-their-start-in-ancient-rome/ If you're going for a historical approach, your character could be sited as the ...


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If you character knows how to make the gas, I see no reason why he wouldn't be able to make it. Within reason, of course. Even just burning peppers could be a gas weapon since the smoke will burn your eyes, and would probably be the simplest gas weapon for your character to use. Your character, if smart enough, could probably use medieval technology and/or ...


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I think there are two main methods for refining. Heat, and Electricity. Both of these could be produced magically and allow metallurgical development more easily. For heat, the issue is that you often need a lot more heat than can be developed through a wood or charcoal fire. Like 4000°F instead of 2000°F. Magical flame could allow you to smelt and work ...


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Specific examples Platinum can be found in native form; so that they could have had platinum in the 1400s if only they had access to native platinum deposits. In real history, platinum was not known to European chemists before the 18th century because there are no significant native platinum deposits in Europe; but there are such deposits in the Americas. ...


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