New answers tagged

2

Superrotation You atmosphere would superrorate - a (known) way to achieve this is to have slow rotation of the planet. Tidally locking (as per Zxyrra's answer) your world is almost a necessary condition if you are around a red dwarf, but that is not quite an Earth-like condition. The most Earth-like and plausible way is to have a habitable Venus (likely ...


0

Signatures aren't your problem, Uranium is Most dating is done with Uranium and if you can't get absolute ages on surrounding rocks you might be able to figure out this pattern exists but you need corresponding strata to have minerals like zircons (mostly found in volcanic ash) with uranium imperfections to get an accurate age. They could easily isolate the ...


3

Your world should be tidally locked. An Earth-sized world close enough to a dim star can exist within the habitable zone while maintaining equal periods of revolution and rotation. This means one side will always face the star, and the other never will. Much of the planet would not be habitable. The far-side would be freezing, and the near-side would be ...


-1

Everyone, consider this: the area is similar to California, the planet is in an ice age, are glacial trees possible? hypothetically YES, and I'll tell you why: assuming we're speculating about a different planet, and it appears we are, life on whatever planet it is could have, and likely would have, taken on much different forms than they did here on Earth. ...


4

Space dust deposition might be different in the disk. Cosmic dust of extraterrestrial origin rains down on the earth all of the time - thousands of tons of it. In your scenario, as the planet passed through the disk, one would expect a change in the quantity and composition of dust accumulating. The dust might be comprised in part of dense elements unusual ...


5

Assuming an Earthlike planet orbiting a halo star and passing through the galactic disk, let's look at the case for geological evidence of supernovae. Because the planet is Earthlike we can assume the geological evidence will be effectively the same for the Earth. If its passage through the galactic disk takes it close to more supernovae than the Earth has ...


2

The current world population went, in the blink of an eye from 7 billion to 3.5 billion. This would be the largest decimation of human population in history and would immedietly make the species endangerd by technical rules. The world population hasn't been this low for a long time. In fact, you'd have to go all the way back to that amazing far flung ...


1

Dinosaurs would be much less popular, dragons it depends on if dragons are still alive There's a saying in paleontology: if turtles were entirely extinct today people would be fascinated by their remains. Turtles are bizarre, their bodies are so strange with their limbs inside their ribcage, skulls that make no sense compared to living reptiles, that if ...


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There are a lot of answers that describe size if humans were cats, but from what I can tell, you want humans to be the same size as cats. If we assume the average human is 6 feet tall, and the average cat is about 18 inches, that means a cat is about a quarter the size of a human, at the longest length, not counting the cats' tail. England (or rather, the ...


1

You need to read this "What If?" post on XKCD which speculates on the possibility of a mole of moles. Your Earth sized humanoid is larger than a mole of moles but the principle is the same, and pretty hideous. It will collapse under gravity to form a hideous sphere of rancid bubbling meat, heating until the decomposer bacteria die off and then going into a ...


0

There's a video game called Xenoblade Chronicles where people on two giants, one called Bionis with organic lifeforms and the other called Mechonis, with mechanical lifeforms. It's a really good game I'd recommend checking it out. Take into account the environment on this dead human. Is there organic life, plants, fauna? How do people breathe? How does time ...


1

Earth is roughly spherical and yet we see many different variations in living conditions. The sphere we live on enables a roughly even distrubution of attributes (e.g. water, air, gravity) which enables plant life and animal live to thrive and move around. Instead of Mt everest imagine a mountain 200 miles high, most of which would have not atmostphere. If ...


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Yes. Even if the earth sized human was dead it would take an extremely long time for the rest of its gargantuan body to realize that. Basically as long as you had an atmosphere,a source of oxygen (algae mats in water and trees adapted to draw on the blood of the gigantic humanoid) and food;of which there is plenty assuming means of harvesting it. Then yeah,...


3

if the earth itself turned into a dead immortal human We are talking of an earthquake of magnitude screw you in the Richter scale. I don’t think human survive. The end. OK, humans are saved by magic. There is a planetary size undead human. So yay! What happened to all the plants? Without any ground to take nutrients from… if they are any around, they are ...


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Sure, if backed up by an entire ecosystem. You'll need rain, or at least rivers or aquifers for water (blood aquifers probably won't work, too salty). So is the body surrounded by water somewhere that can evaporate and fall? You'll need plants. Human's can't go pure carnivore, you'll get scurvy and other nutritional deficiencies (if they could dig to ...


4

Actually... If people were cats, then people would want a BIGGER Britain. A typical cat - Felis silvestris cattus (Fsc) - is often compared but not necessacily a derivate of felis silvestris (Fs) - the european wild cat. Both demand territories. Territories for domestic Fsc range from 0.07 to 0.28 km², those for Fs range from 1 to 8.7 km². Let's take the ...


9

This is an excellent and sophisticated question. There would be many, many ways to think about this, such as conservation of energy, material science (you can not just slim down materials abstractly, issues of tensile strength, laminar flow etc, become critical), farming and food production, and so on. Just one interesting issue which would need to be ...


0

Hm going by rough length I would go from wikipedia - a "mid-sized" cat to have shoulder height of 0.3 m , a "mid-sized" man around 1.8 m .. so divide length by 6 - and squares by 36 .. Going from Great Britain (island)'s area of 219.331 km² .. gives ~6100 km². If I assume the same length "translation" to your fantasy planet, gives a roughly 2200km diameter ...


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Roughly 50,000 square miles. Did you know that the length of a 'foot' differed quite a bit - ranging everywhere between 9 and 16 inches. But ultimately, it was a measurement that was designed based off a person's size-of-foot. Did you know that the mile has been defined both by "number of paces" and "number of feet"? It gets its name from the Roman '...


53

People are already cat sized. There are machines that People have bred to provide food for People... those machines are called “humans” (in the machines’ own tongue). The scale of England need not change because the People are already its rulers.


72

Size by mass is not the same as size by 2d footprint There is a cat here. She weighs about 5 lbs. I weigh 200 lbs, rounding to nearest 100. Cat is 1/40th my size. A sack the size of me could hold 40 cats, tightly packed by someone besides me. England is 50,000 square miles. Divided by 40 is 1250 square miles. Long Island in the US is 1401 square ...


1

They wouldn't notice for long enough to matter. Just ignore the bits about the dragon taking off and you still have your answer: basic planetary destruction at worst, entirely planetary surface remodeling at best. If you suddenly whisk away several billion cu km of rock (all the lands with everything on them are just gone), the rest of the planet isn't ...


0

It would be the news of the century, and spread as fast as a messenger could ride to every corner of Europe. The Ottoman Empire -- aka "The Terrible Turk" was the biggest threat to Christian Europe. Losing your neighboring threatening superpower would be a huge event. The church bells would ring out in every city, town and village, the news would be shouted ...


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One possibility is that his home planet is exposed to much higher levels of ionising radiation (gamma/X rays, high-energy particles, etc.) than the Earth. Exposure to high levels of ionising radiation slows down the growth and multiplication of microbes (including yeast) by producing free radicals which damage DNA (or whatever kind of genetic material his ...


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No, at least not what actually disappeared. What if China and its silk was still there? What if just the land in the middle disappeared and China, Mongolia and half Russia was still there? Big difference in size and economic perspectives. And they have at least a vague idea of its size and location. If we were talking about knowing that some land ...


1

So your question poses the situation of the world as it was in the 15th Century, plodding along, until in the blink of an eye, everything east of the Urals, the eastern shore of the Mediterranean, Black and Red Seas, and north of the Indian Ocean, is - poof - just gone. No land, no animals, no people, just a massive hole down to bedrock where Russia, China, ...


1

The beginning of the 15th century was about AD 1401. At that time Russia was a tributary of the Golden Horde which ruled partially in Europe and partially in Asia. At that time the Ottoman Turks were expanding from Asia into Europe, and had already moved their capital to Adrianople in Europe. The Ottomans besieged Constantinople for 12 years from 1390 ...


2

Don't forget the Ottoman Empire Most answers focus on the Far East. However, the Ottoman Empire was a big player in European politics, having conquered vast territories in the South-East of Europe and was in the process of pushing onward. The question is based on late medieval Bohemia. Which was directly bordering Hungary. Which in turn was directly ...


1

Huricanes / typhoons. These things are unknown in Europe because Europe has Asia to the east and the tropical cyclons generally start over the water and move to the west. Now Europe has rather large ocean (pacific + what was Asia) and all the circular atmospheric phenomena, probably even stronger than in east Asia, because they have more ocean to grow in. ...


3

Yes, everyone on earth would notice it If the whole land mass of Asia suddenly disappeared then this would soon be very noticeable because of the extreme wind speeds as air and water from the rest of the planet fills up the void. Cities within a hundred kilometers from the Asian border would be blown away, a large part of the world population would be ...


1

Dropping sea levels and a change in climate have already been covered. But I have the impression that removing enormous amounts of planet stuff should influence plate tectonics. After all, planet stuff is comparably heavy (although the upper layer must be the lightest part, since the heavier stuff mostly sank to the ground when it was still molten. Anyway. ...


9

This is kind of a mixed ball of stuff here. As for the hypothetical village, peoples in villages didn't get around much. It's sort of accepted that the bulk of the population in a village was pretty stationary, with folks living their entire lives never travelling much more than 30 km from where they were born. Yes, there are traders, nomadic people ...


2

They would know something was wrong, but not what it was for a little while Climactic Effects: Asia is the largest landmass on earth, and thus it’s massive size has a considerable effect on the climate due to how much heat is reflected by land compared to water. Magically removing Asia would mean that the waters of the Pacific and Indian Oceans would ...


6

Yes, they would notice They would notice within a couple months at least, a few decades at most, depending on the exact part of the century. The 15th century was when the printing press was invented, and it spread fast. Also in the 15th century the Portuguese developed caravels and one dude called Vasco da Gama made an amazing discovery: they could sail ...


13

People would notice it, but they wouldn't necessarily know what happened I'm going to assume you meant that all of the land that makes up Asia just disappeared one day. To answer your question directly at first: Europe is connected to Asia: so people at the arbitrary edge at which point Europe turns into Asia would disappear. Traders would know - and ...


10

Yes The 15th century Europeans had two qualities which would ensure that everyone knew about this. The first is that they knew that Asia existed, and regularly traded with it. The second quality is that they had quite a powerful religious organization in the Church. This is how I see the timeline: Asia disappears. A few weeks or months pass, and a ...


6

Bringing the Pacific Ocean all the way to the Urals would have a profound impact on travel and geopolitics even if there were no associated weather changes. The central European powers might consider the states of India, Bactria, Central Asia, and the far East irrelevant, but the powers immediately bordering central Europe would not. Poland-Lithuania and ...


43

Word of mouth says: "An act of God" People living in France wouldn't see direct evidence of Asia disappearing - but they would hear about it soon enough! Eastern Europeans would see direct evidence of the land next to their houses disappearing. Such a catastrophe would immediately spread across the continent through word of mouth because of its religious ...


0

There would be a dramatic effect on the climate, though it’s hard to say exactly what it would be without access to a climate modelling supercomputer. The dividing line between Europe and Asia is a bit arbitrary, but east winds would only be travelling over hundreds of miles of land instead of thousands, making the climate less extreme. And the Himalayas ...


17

Common folk in 15th century Europe surely would notice if Asia vanished, though it might take a while. How? They'd notice that their "betters", the wealthy and the nobility, quit having new silk garments made (because there was no new silk to make them from). Servants in the mansions and palaces would notice first, then the word would pass from them to ...


4

Most common people in central Europe in the 15th century wouldn't be likely to notice for quite a while if EVERYTHING more than a hundred miles from where they were born vanished. The only people who would be likely to notice your proposed scenario would be people directly involved in the Silk Road trade, and even they wouldn't be able to easily tell the ...


0

If there is a floating biome high up in the atmosphere that might produce a lot of oxygen and if there were limited numbers or no species of animals that oxygen might build up. At first anything that could be oxidized on the surface would be but eventually there would be little left to burn and high pressure oxygen would accumulate. Any falling matter ...


4

I would suggest that the result would be something like Venus. You might start with a planet with 1atm Earth like atmosphere at 50km altitude and a similar composition down to the surface but that would not be stable. A much deeper atmosphere would absorb more heat and at such a high pressure and oxygen concentration, organic material on the surface would ...


2

After a prolonged period of time, your explorers in .25g are going to have a difference in physiology from their forefathers. A good example of this is shown in "The Expanse". This will inevitably impact weapon design. High recoil weapons will likely remain in the purvue of specialists. The reasoning is that with less gravity, there is no longer the ...


3

If your 17th century cast-aways departed this realm before the Isaac Newton published his seminal works, then they could have developed their science on very different ideas. A low-g world, recoil of firearms would be a more significant problem. The moment of inertia of the human form firing a weapon lets us sight down our extended arms. In a low-g ...


2

Well after 400 years weapon designs change, look at our current weapons compared to then. You could keep in some aesthetic properties with the design but 17th century swords won't translate to 21st century drones. The Gravity on the other hand does provide an important factor. Our tanks for example are weaker then they have to be and it is for a good ...


2

Antarctic penguins rely on available fish in the sea, and relatively undisturbed and predator-free land areas. Their key survival trait is that they are able to live in areas which most other animals find uninhabitable. They have very few defence mechanisms other than simple avoidance. As long as there are plentiful fish stocks they should be able to ...


12

The great auk used to live in the Arctic but was driven to extinction by humans. https://johnjames.audubon.org/extinction-great-auk They are not technically penguins, but very similar in appearance and characteristics. You could introduce these to the Not-Arctic, or just introduce normal penguins and make the claim that if the great auk could survive ...


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