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1

Gravity is described by its potential. The gravitational potential is a continuous value for each point in space, it does not make discontinuous jumps between two adjacent points in space. Gravity is the derivative of the potential, i.e. the 'obliqueness' of the potential at your location. The straightforward interpretation of this magic is that it changes ...


2

Space is distorted by mass It is often said that mass and spacetime are linked. Mass distorts spacetime. Although one could argue mass doesn't and it's just energy/momentum that distorts it, or gravity itself. Still we can see that around any mass it's distorted and gravity is in effect. A further distortion of spacetime would then increase gravity. The ...


5

Yes, this wouldn't be a problem. The magnetic field at the outside of a planet's core very roughly scales like $$B_{\text{core}}\sim\sqrt{\frac{\rho\Omega}{\sigma}}$$ with $\rho$ the core density, $\Omega$ the rotational speed and $\sigma$ the core's electrical conductivity. The field should be a dipole, and a dipolar magnetic field falls off cubically, i.e. ...


7

It's difficult that you will get rust in a space station, because usually lighter alloys than steel are used for space application, like aluminum, which does not rust. Said that, it has happened in the past that some space missions have become a mess: notoriously, one of the first NASA astronauts to experience space sickness ended up so sick that he had ...


7

Seems likely that under those conditions that electrical attraction and air-flow would dominate. Kind of like how on Earth computers are absolutely great dust collectors. However, indeed, anything that isn't picked up by static-charged surfaces or air-filters is likely to end up in people's lungs.


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