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2

I would say at first glance, a hard no. Because all the opposing fleet would need to do is drop munitions or even junk into the lower and faster orbit of the defending fleet and watch as it smacks into their ships at untold velocity shredding the fleet. Another reason you don't want to fight a defender in orbital space is that you are now in range of ...


2

Short answer: Known Exoplanets orbiting main sequence stars have year lengths varying from 4.31 hurs to about 1,000,000 years, so the longest known year is about 2,040,816,327 times as long as the shortest. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_exoplanet_extremes#Orbital_characteristics[1] But the requirements for planetary habitabiity for carbon based and ...


1

The closest a habitable planet can be to its sun is less than .01 AU, if its star is at the lowermost mass to achieve nuclear fusion. At a distance of exactly .01 AU, a year will last .00353 Earth years. If we set the limit of how large the star of a habitable planet is at 2.25 solar masses, the furthest an habitable planet can be is 64 AU, which would mean ...


5

The mass of a main sequence star determines its luminosity. You've specified that $M=1.5M_{\odot}$; for roughly Sun-like stars (i.e. within a factor of $\sim2$ of the Sun's mass), the luminosity scales with mass as $L\propto M^3$; we can then expect your star to have a luminosity of $\approx6L_{\odot}$. The boundaries of the classical habitable zone can be ...


-1

Wide binary. Your 3 star system could be a "wide binary" - actually a trinary as you propose. http://www.ifa.hawaii.edu/info/press-releases/WideBinaryStars/ Now Dr. Bo Reipurth of the Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii at Manoa, USA, and Dr. Seppo Mikkola of Tuorla Observatory, University of Turku, Finland, have used computer ...


1

Since you ask about avoiding future supernova risks, let me reuse my answer to this question. The question was about the safe distance from a supernova for a Dyson sphere, but since the estimate I do is about the energy amount I think it can be applied also here: Mandatory What if quote: Rule of thumb for estimating supernova-related numbers: However big ...


0

If you want a stable system with red dwarfs you need to take a different approach: Put a large black hole in the center, a ring of stars around it. If the black hole is big enough your stars will be stable. The planet(s) orbit the black hole, not the dwarfs. Do it right and you can have a habitable world, but beware of the radiation coming off the jets ...


0

Does your perfect planet need to NOT have a moon? My scientific knowledge is probably lacking, but I would think it unlikely that the planet would be perfect without a moon at all. Perhaps your planet has a moon but its current orbit is eccentric or orbiting it in such a way that the planet cannot have stable seasons or a proper day/night cycle. Assuming you ...


0

In case anyone wants to try designing a solar system where a habitable planet orbits a star with a mass similar to that of 40 Eridania A and yet has a year that needs to be similar in length to an Earth year, here is the evidence. According to my calculations from "Yesteryear" explained below, a Vulcan year should either equal 0.923 (zero point ...


3

I think you are looking for two contrasting mechanisms here: as you correctly state, strong tidal forces are the most logic source for the jets. However, if the tidal forces come from a resonant orbit, they won't be permanent, but only present at the times when the two bodies are close enough. If instead the tidal forces come from the interaction with the ...


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