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7

The arrangement you wish does not seem feasible. If by "dim" star you mean a star that is dimmer than our sun, you are probably thinking of a red dwarf. Such stars are thought to be far from habitable, because: The habitable zone around them requires a tidal lock; They are usually flare stars, which means the star facing side of planets in the habitable is ...


11

Better than that; there's a game that will do it. Steam has a game called Universe Sandbox where you can line up different planets, stars, et al with different masses and trajectories. I've never tried it but as I understand it the game is capable of simulating the orbits of planets, stars and the like in a way that you can graphically see the results. In ...


2

The way I would do it is have your moon orbiting a gas giant which itself is in a P-type orbit in a binary star system. Your gas giant orbits a small, dim star which is a binary companion with a much larger, much brighter star. The primary energy source for your moon is the more distant of the two. The shadow period would occur when the bright companion is ...


3

Our asteroid belt is so thin that we send spacecraft through it withiut fear of a collision. It won't overshadow anything. An orbital arrangement where a planet is eclipsed for a quarter of its orbit is very unlikely. I can think of two situations in which it can work: If your planet is orbiting a relatively dark body, such as a black hole or a pulsar, and ...


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