New answers tagged

1

See MOOSE project of General Electric designed in the early 1960s - only 90 kg. I bet that with modern materials we could make it even lighter. The key to make re-entry easier is to increase surface to mass ratio. If you have good ratio then even paper plane made from silicone treated paper would survive.


0

The real concern with this situation isn't related to falling to Earth (gravitational potential energy), but to the problem of kinetic energy. Anything in low-Earth orbit travels at a high speed: The mean orbital velocity needed to maintain a stable low Earth orbit is about 7.8 km/s (28,000 km/h; 17,000 mph) — Low Earth orbit - Wikipedia Using round ...


-1

Let's see what happens: First, you have to enter on a very narrow angle. Too deep, you black out, tumble and die. Too shallow, you bounce and you probably run out of life support before you come back down. That's an accuracy you're not going to accomplish by eyeball. Second, as you enter you need to maintain just the right shape to cause the shockwave to ...


2

Even if it is possible, it won't happen; since the astronaut was in a space pod, his or her suit probably wasn't designed for re-entry. A space suit strong enough to withstand re-entry would be so bulky and reinforced, it might as well be a small spaceship. Of course, the odds that this astronaut survived the pod explosion to begin with are, shall we say, ...


-3

Given you had enough supplies, you could force an intercept to a space station. If you had 60 m/s, and some solar panels to power life support, you might not be screwed. But the force in reentry would almost surely kill you. Even taking the heatshield from your pod, pushing it to a deorbit trajectory, and duct-taping yourself to it after covering the ...


-1

As I see it you have basically two options. Migrate to Mars before you are too far away or move underground with fusion plants. Since you probably want to stay on earth I would suggest fusion plants. Since the planet will become very cold you will need to create huge underground caverns. Deep enough underground it will become warm again so you don't need ...


0

Log cabins You'd be amazed at what 11 people who are healthy and motivated can accomplish in a year. Wikipedia points out that there are lots of tropical forests in this region, which means your survivors could build some swanky log cabins using basic hand tools. Without any nails or power tools, you could build multiple cabins like this. Here's a video ...


3

They have forest, tools, and skills. They can make pretty much anything that doesn't require metal. Pegs can sub for nails, in many ways, and if one or more have experience in Japanese/southeast Asian woodworking, the need will be very small in any case. They might well start with huts resembling those from the Gilligan's Island TV series, as a first step ...


4

Tim will die of old age before he runs of food. The average supermarket has enough calories canned or vacuum packed to keep you alive for 50 years. 70 if you dont mind dog food. Find a place with a rainwater tank. I understand these are pretty rare in some parts of north America. By law every house in my city (south Australia) needs one. You may need to use ...


7

Some math: 25mm/m2/h and about 10km2 area leads to approximately 70 m3/s of water. Not even close to large rivers, but it is a decent stream. Approx 1/100 of Danube. Population density varies, taking a reasonably high estimate of 1k/km2: 10k people, each with 100l of problems. 5k cars, each with 100l of problems. 5k "misc" (homes and whatnot), each ...


Top 50 recent answers are included