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Size cap of vertebrate fliers on "Flyers' World" (10atm, 0.5g)

The wing size of the animal does not need to be as large due to the higher pressure of the atmosphere. As a wing would still push the same amount of mass downwards in a smaller area. Look at the ...
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0 votes

Anatomically Correct Asian Dragons

What are we looking at? These dragons have had a lot of forms throughout the ages, but the current understanding would be something like this: Mammalian Head Antlers/Horns Mane Barbels Fish Scales ...
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Would there be any advantages to having all hands and no legs?

Most obviously, dropping legs would cause your poor organism to lose abilities which could not be replaced by arms. (More usefully, why have you not included your own ideas? How far did your ...
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0 votes

Would there be any advantages to having all hands and no legs?

To put it simple Homo Armyus would be less mobile on land, but more dexterous and a more efficient worker in fine motor skills. I imagine in an earth-like setting they'd be good swimmers and possibly ...
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1 vote

Anatomically Correct Asian Dragons

Axolotl A slightly better fit in the salamander family may be the Axolotl. Unlike other salamanders they have long ornate gills that resemble the frills of an Asian Dragon. They also have certain ...
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3 votes

Anatomically Correct Asian Dragons

Olm Your dragon bears a resemblence to the Olm. Long snakey body, hairless with itty bitty legs. The olm is a type of blind cave salamander that lives underwater. Master of the Sea and Sky indeed! ...
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9 votes

Would there be any advantages to having all hands and no legs?

Homo armyus is misnomor. In truth, Homo Armyus is a member of the family Hominidae, but he doesn't belong to the Homo. He's most likely more closely related to the Pongo than to Homo. In fact, I want ...
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4 votes

Would there be any advantages to having all hands and no legs?

I think its simpler to look at this in reverse, what factors make feet more efficient then hands and how can we remove those pro-feet factors to make all-hands more efficient. Feet are basically hands ...
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5 votes
Accepted

Anatomically Correct Asian Dragons

They are related to Komodo Dragons But for the horns, weather control, and flying, these are very close to being oversized Komodo Dragons (like the one above) with lots of frills added. In fact, our ...
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1 vote

Would there be any advantages to having all hands and no legs?

Space Travel Maybe the species was designed for space travel, i.e. zero gravity, where legs do nothing useful, while more hands can be used for grappling/holding onto walls, equipment etc. Perhaps ...
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2 votes

Would there be any advantages to having all hands and no legs?

A healthier back. The main issue with the upright stance is the load placed on the spine. Quadrupedal animals have an arc-shaped spine which is perfect for that stance. Your "Homo Armyus" ...
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6 votes

Would there be any advantages to having all hands and no legs?

Monkey business. The kind of thing you're describing seems in many ways like a more specialized, less muscular and weirder version of a chimpanzee. Many primates, including many apes, have feet that ...
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22 votes

Would there be any advantages to having all hands and no legs?

Arboreal life. https://www.serengeti-park.de/en/siamang-symphalangus-syndactylus/ Here is a siamang, one of the "little apes"; this as opposed to the "great apes" which count ...
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5 votes

Compressible satellite ears?

Some notes on size and frequency Your creature won't fly with that one (Note: below will be of consideration with flying animals, but given the fact this anthropod has the size of a raven, it will be ...
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3 votes

Compressible satellite ears?

Frilled ears similar to the neck frills that frilled neck lizards from northern Australia have are possible. If they are shaped correctly they can be parabolic and focus the sounds to the ear hole ...
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0 votes

Can an organism have body structure materials that crumble upon being injured?

The only thing that comes close to this is when some species of gecko, salamander and tuatara intentionally sacrifice their tails to a predator so the animal can escape and the predator deals with a ...
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  • 3,135
0 votes

Can an organism have body structure materials that crumble upon being injured?

How is it to be used? Problem is that to possess a crumple zone/ parts that are designed to crumple. It will cost something to build. It will cost something to maintain. Yet a typical crumple zone is ...
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1 vote

How could a creature make its feathers or hairs glow?

Normal feathers have hollow shafts but solid structures in the vane. Your griffons have hollow channels along the outer surface of the barbs of their feathers that are coated internally with luciferin-...
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3 votes

How could a creature make its feathers or hairs glow?

Pic 1: bioluminescent algae Pic 2: algae living in the fur of a sloth In short, the griffin cultivates bioluminescent algae in its feathers, and through some method of stimulating the algae can make ...
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4 votes

How could a creature make its feathers or hairs glow?

A mix of chemically-driven bioluminescence, and Cephalopod-like Chromatophors. Chemical lights can get pretty bright. Not usually eye-hurtingly bright without a lot of added heat, but industrial-...
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5 votes

How could a creature make its feathers or hairs glow?

OLED+Bio-Electricity+Fiber-Optics This critter has a metabolism that leaves him practically glowing in infrared. The reason? He's also a bio-electric generator driving a wrap-around OLED screen on his ...
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1 vote

How could a creature make its feathers or hairs glow?

hair and feathers are dead keratin, they have no connection to the normal energy source in the blood. perhaps OLED feathers powered by and an electric eel physiology, I guess it's possible. Or ...
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3 votes

How could a creature make its feathers or hairs glow?

Phosphorescence The Dazzling Griffin has feathers incorporating phosphors, which absorb light energy during the day. At night, it is time to for the Dazzling Griffin to demonstrate its display. If it ...
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8 votes

How could a creature make its feathers or hairs glow?

Bio luminosity and refraction Bio luminescence is active in many small creatures. Though it is important to note that their light is weak, so it is near exclusively shown at night. There are ...
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0 votes

How could a creature make its feathers or hairs glow?

Bioluminescence is an energy-devouring characteristic of a living thing, and it seems to have not to have evolved in large land animals. What good would bioluminescence do for such prey species as ...
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6 votes

How could a creature make its feathers or hairs glow?

It rolls in glowing fungus. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_bioluminescent_fungus_species#Species There are apocryphal reports of glowing birds, especially owls. One theory is that the owls ...
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15 votes
Accepted

How could a creature make its feathers or hairs glow?

Bioluminescent bacteria: The Griffin's feathers, no longer needed for flight, are now harboring a symbiotic bioluminescent bacteria that grows in patterns on the feathers based on how the feathers ...
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8 votes

How could a creature make its feathers or hairs glow?

It can use the same process used by fireflies, which can modulated the light they emit from their abdomen at will. The glow will be caused by an optically active molecule, which will be excited as a ...
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0 votes

How would evolution be influenced by the remnants of humanities servant robots?

Well, considering this humans had tech that replaced organs and probably didint have to take care of their health to live the 700 years, i belive most of the food were delicious and unhealthy, lots of ...
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4 votes

What kind of creature would be able to provide nutrients to my floating plant mat?

If there are no other creatures making a nest or living in the roots then there is no competition for space and food, and little danger from predators. That by itself offers whatever creature starts ...
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2 votes
Accepted

What kind of creature would be able to provide nutrients to my floating plant mat?

Large deep diving benthic feeder. That poops a lot. https://news.berkeley.edu/2011/07/06/gray-whales-likely-survived-the-ice-ages-by-changing-their-diets/ You want the minerals down in the deep ...
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  • 277k
0 votes
Accepted

Griffin with Hybrid Foreleg Anatomy

This anatomy is certainly possible for a griffin, though it would come with some trade-offs. The main issue would be balance. With all four legs attached near the rear of the body, the griffin would ...
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0 votes

How much damage could hoof fingers do?

This is a really difficult question to answer, because there are so many variables that would affect the outcome. For instance, the strength of the creature's muscles, the weight of the creature, the ...
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1 vote

Seeing in the Dark - Flashlight Eyes

Other animals may be able to see the light Some animals can see parts of the electromagnetic spectrum that humans cannot. For example, bees can see into the ultraviolet range a bit. Many insects are ...
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0 votes

Low gravity planet, insect niche design

There are a few ways that lower gravity could affect the body plan and anatomy of small creatures that fill the insect niche. One way is that it could affect the way they move. In lower gravity, ...
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3 votes

Low gravity planet, insect niche design

For crawlers, there is already a huge variety of body plans on Earth. All of these creatures inhabit the niche you envision for your world. They have very different body plans. And you can find more ...
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6 votes

Seeing in the Dark - Flashlight Eyes

Imho having the light source in the eye is the main issue. It's hard to imagine how the light source in the eye wouldn't outshine the light reflected from surfaces several meters away. A quick fix ...
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2 votes

Seeing in the Dark - Flashlight Eyes

Backlit eyelids, Reflective corneas The eyes do not emit light. Rows of bioluminescent cells on the back of the eyelids do it instead. Creatures who use this kind of darkvision usually have a silvery ...
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26 votes

Seeing in the Dark - Flashlight Eyes

There are already animals that do what you want, in the sound domain: bats. Let's just steal shamelessly. More flash for your buck Constantly producing a distinctive light source bright enough to see ...
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  • 2,770
2 votes

Clothing preference and Skin type of race which can absorb heat energy via skin?

Some elements in this world have the power to absorb and emit heat from sunlight in a different form. Those people can makes clothes in which those elements are studded. The outer part (part of ...
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8 votes

Seeing in the Dark - Flashlight Eyes

Eyes are receivers Eyes are receivers of light. The light is focused on retina where receptors sense the light and send the information to brain through optic nerve. Bioluminescence To emit light by ...
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2 votes

Alien biochemistry

It sustains itself with by passively drawing in body heat and the electricity from the nervous systems of other animals to convert into chemical energy. How does it exactly do this ? What mechanism ...
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9 votes

Seeing in the Dark - Flashlight Eyes

I see one big problem with eyes emitting "darklight" (my shortcut definition for "light that can be seen by species gifted with darkvision"). Or any device emitting darklight. But ...
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  • 4,953
2 votes

Human precursors design powered armor for invertebratre Cephalopod slaves that have lungs too, up-right or octopus-form?

Robo Octobot Humanoid Giant Robots are a terrible idea. For details see the many questions and answers on this very site. The reason humanoid mechs are cool is they are the same shape as people. This ...
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1 vote

Clothing preference and Skin type of race which can absorb heat energy via skin?

The Cloaca The naughty bits of a lizard are kept safely inside the cloaca. The cloaca being of course the single opening where the waste goes out and the sex goes in. See Dinosaur Comics: When they ...
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  • 41.3k
2 votes
Accepted

Black photosynthetic large active animals

Let us calculate an energy budget for a creature with an amazing pigment that can capture a lot of light energy. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Solar_irradiance#Irradiance_on_Earth's_surface ...
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-1 votes

Black photosynthetic large active animals

Extrapolating from the below articles. and granted even in those, the lack of real research on earth based plant photosynthetic efficiency. The theoretical maximal photosynthetic energy conversion ...
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  • 2,236
2 votes
Accepted

Can I put a Biological Refrigerator inside an organism and use it to create a sub zero spray?

Putting a fridge inside a creature is going to mess up the creature There's nothing to really stop biology evolving a fridge. In many ways, the components are there - we've got pumps (circulatory ...
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1 vote

Is there a most efficient number of arm-like appendages?

The optimal number isn't necessarily even, and they may not all be equivalent. Niven and Pournelle described a roughly humanoid alien species (“Moties”) with three differently-sized arms in The Mote ...
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0 votes

Is there a most efficient number of arm-like appendages?

The needed for the moment. The best body would be the one that can adapt to every situation, if he needs to grab something then he will split his arm in two, if he needs to work with something that ...
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