New answers tagged

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Y beings are ultraviolet colored. 10% of X people have has eye surgery for cataract, which replaces the lens of the eye. The trick is that our retinas are sensitive to UV light, but it gets blocked out by the cornea and lens of the eye. Some people who have had surgery for cataract can see UV - it depends only on the kind of artificial lens implanted into ...


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I’d suggest using something that detect infrared light. Even if the being can pass light around it’s body the infrared of the body has to go somewhere, especially on its feet’s or so. The result would be that the surrounding still heats up ..and that’s what you might see. The only case where that being doesn’t emit even body radiation is, if it is completely ...


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Your Y creatures are very small. The analogy is scabies mites. Measuring a fraction of a millimeter, most people cannot perceive them with the naked eye. With a magnifying glass or better, a microscope they are easy to see. Your sharp eyed people who can perceive the Y mites do indeed find them horrifying, because mites are crawling all over them ...


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Since 10% of Xs can see the Ys, the question would be how do they see them. Given a "stretched science" framework, we have two clear possibilities - Biological differences (10% of Xs can see an extended range of electromagnetic frequencies beyond those of most Xs), and psychic/psionic/extrasensory abilities. Extended Frequency sight This option has a ...


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This answer will reach back into much older versions of space opera, back to the days of the super-scientific epics. When EE "Doc" Smith, Edmond "Worldwrecker" Hamiliton, and John W Campell, Jr ruled the roost. Assume a super-scientific technology that combines both a field drive and a force-field. The effective power of the drive and force-field falls ...


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Helium atoms are so small (even smaller than hydrogen thanks to their structure) that they permeate any material. There is real-world example it got into iPhone clock crystals and caused malfunction. Vacuum tubes and CRT displays, or even fluorescent lighting, will probably be impractical, they will require constantly pumping the helium out. Helium can cause ...


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Let’s start by identifying the principles that brought the whole Carrier/Fighter system into existence in the first place: 1: You need diminishing returns in propulsion technology. E.g. the cost and weight of an engine increases at more than a 1:1 ratio with the power output. With rockets this isn’t really the case, but it absolutely is with almost any ...


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How about reinforced concrete? If you can introduce other material into the mix (like steel rods), you have a much more flexible range of substances to work with. Is silica rock? You can make lenses, mirrors and all kinds of interesting stuff. Also: elegant stone boats.


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hydrogen is too weak – one flaming arrow and the approaching flying battle-platform turns into (cinematographically appealing) fireworks. Only if your engineers are idiots. The cinematic flames from the Hindenburg crash are not burning hydrogen--they are from the combusting envelope, which was basically painted with jet fuel. The hydrogen didn't help, ...


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If the wizard can alter crystalline structure of the stone or yet better, purify it, this could lead to ceramics made from natural minerals with interesting properties. Alumina, which is very widespread in nature, allows for metal/ceramics composites used in modern armour. Zirconia (found in nature as mineral Baddeleyite) is used for ceramic knives. Both can ...


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Precision is a relative term--for implementations that a traditional cutting process that suffices, precision could mean cutting with an edge damage area less than one millimeter deep, but for something so huge that it require the energy of a nuclear bomb to cut into, which would be at least tens of metres thick, the damage zone could be tolerated for up to ...


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A Shotgun / Boar Spear https://www.saufeder.eu/index_en.html Using the rounded hollow spearhead, a single shell could be loaded into the haft like a zip gun The person could set spear against a charge attack and then fire a specialized round directly into the monster. You could pick from silver rounds for werewolves, solid wood rounds for vampires, brass ...


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No need to look to the New World. In Europe there are lots of old castles standing round. In some models the place of last resort is an inner keep, a big strong tower. In many cases this keep did not have an entry at the bottom, but halfway up. In times of peace there would be wooden steps up to this entrance, but in war they would destroy this, and you ...


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The grooves in the Devil's Tower could actually help someone climb it, depending on how the scale of the grooves corresponded to their climbing method. If the grooves of the tower don't help someone climb it they probably will not hinder them from climbing it either. You would need to get the opinion of an experienced climber to suggest a design of grooves ...


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According to the Wikipedia page on Devils Tower The first known ascent of Devils Tower by any method occurred on July 4, 1893. [...] They completed this first ascent after constructing a ladder of wooden pegs driven into cracks in the rock face. It could be made by stacking granite blocks, cut in the suitable shape. Since it was climbed rather early in ...


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The only gun any true monster hunter needs is this little jobbie: Yep, your basic punt gun! Fix a claymore on the end of that and Bob's your monster blasting uncle! As used in Tremors 4: The Legend Begins


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While everyone so far had provided very...entertaining...answers, there are already very old service weapons which fit the bill. The first choice would be the classic Lee-Enfeild rifle fitted with a 22" "Sword" bayonet. The rifle is very accurate and powerful, with the round capable of killing man sized targets past 600 yards (older Lee-Enfield's were ...


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Detachable long rifle. A "takedown gun" can be disassembled. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Takedown_gun Having the firing apparatus (stock, receiver) attached when you are swinging your polearm around offers no benefit and you are liable to damage the firing apparatus. Keep that stuff wrapped up and in your pack. If you are at close quarters you are ...


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Pod people. Clones are easy to make. Make your own. Replace current working clones with your pod clones. They are like the originals in every way, hooked into the mass mind, doing menial jobs. Eventually all the clones will be your replacements. But when the bass drops, all of the pod clones launch into the Harlem Shake. Thus ends civilization.


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I would go for the classic pump-action shotgun. For starters, when you expect to use a gun/melee weapon hyrbid you do so because you expect to be shooting one second and stabbing the next. Considering its post-apocalyptical-urban-fantasy the shotgun would be a favorite over more high-end accurate weapons like the .50 cal answer as the shotgun would be more ...


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Yes, unless there are receivers all over the place. An implanted radio beacon will have only limited power, even with futuristic technology. This will not penetrate rock, and it will penetrate badly through caves or tunnels. The enemies might be able to determine the hole in the ground where their fugitive vanished, and once they come close in the tunnels ...


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Jam the communication In my story, there is a large group of humanoid clones that help the city function, doing mundane tasks such as cleaning and maintaining the city. Doing all of the minimum wage jobs and 95% of the manual labor. This is almost like a single utopian city(the only one) in the world where costs are cheap due to the abundance of clones ...


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Biowarfare. The clones all have an identical genetic makeup. Given this, it should be pretty easy to engineer a designer virus that will specifically target the clones. If the virus was airborne and vicious enough, it could kill them faster than new ones can be created. New clones step out of the Clone Generator, take their first breath of infected air, ...


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The XM500 mixed with a halberd. While I like MorrisTheCat's answer, the American M82 is a superior sniper rifle, also using lovely .50 BMG ammunition (which is the same size as 12.7mm, because Americans can't metric), as it carries a ten-round clip and is semi-automatic, as opposed to the KSVK's bolt action. (Though it's not Russian-quality so don't whack ...


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Decentralized swarm intelligence depends heavily on the ability of each member in the swarm to find unoccupied space. They don't need to know what everyone else is doing, only what job is available for them to do. If the available jobs come from a list of pre programmed functions, then the city is destabilized as soon as a need appears which wasn't ...


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Generally speaking I'm not a fan of hybrid weapons like this, since the general result is that you wind up, as @AndreiROM pointed out "Turning two good weapons into one crappy one." There is an exception scenario though, so that's what I'm going to design to. That exception is when you have something big and fast charging you, and you want to be able to ...


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i dont know much about gun but there exist axe bayonet. from https://hugelol.com/lol/86852 from https://www.reddit.com/r/mildlyinteresting/comments/6eonme/found_this_combination_axeflintlock_rifle_in_a/ from https://ilovefunnythings.wordpress.com/2016/03/31/the-british-had-the-bayonet-the-germans-had-the-axe-gun/ from http://thegunsman.com/2013/12/axe-...


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A bayonet is a small knife you attach to a rifle or a similar weapon. Emphasis on small. It has to be, otherwise the gun will be too heavy for you to use it normally. Make it too big and you will hamper the ability to use the gun as a gun - and once you do that, there is no point in attaching the thing to a gun anymore. So, if you want to attach a melee ...


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How about a no-moving-parts solution? Do it like trees do, with capillary action. Trees manage to lift water from the ground all the way to their tops this way. The leaves evaporate the water, which causes a suction pressure which pulls more water from cells below. Trees are a constant elevator of water. I can imagine a long rope of some hydrophilic ...


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Both, actually. Its a tricky question, given that we have exactly 1 species to draw from, and it clearly evolved to be effective in the environment it evolved in. Its hard to work in both extremes. Yes, you get hot working in hot weather, but go try working in a Siberian winter, and you'll see that cold can be just as problematic. Cold lets you dissipate ...


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Here's a simple solution. The satellite(s) covering this particular area are missing, damaged or both (if more than one satellite). While not a problem for aircraft (assuming there ARE aircraft), since these can "observe" other satellites from higher up, for anyone on the ground in that area you're getting too few signals to get a reliable position. The ...


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Very simple suggestion: Is their gear rated for use in that type of desert? Ruggedized gear comes in several ratings for various environments. The gear supplied could just not be suited for desert use, or use in a desert with a dust particles that small or that hot, and simply get clogged up or overheat and die in a very short space of time. Like seconds ...


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You say that even if there are no sandstorms in a "good" day, the desert is always windy. The answer to your loss of connectivity could be the following: The desert is made of a sand very rich in metallic/conductive compounds. The sand is so fine that when it is raised by winds it keeps floating around for a very long while. There are high-altitude winds ...


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The satellites refuse to serve that area for some geopolitical reason The satellites are being disabled while overflying that area owing to rebel activity in the area, due to a past war (and nobody bothered to turn it back on again because nobody cares about that region), or the sat network provides many civic services beneficial to governments and ...


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I once stood at the middle of Uyuni salt flat, which is a 10,000 km2 flat surface 3 km above sea level. It was daytime and I had just replaced the batteries for my Garmin hand GPS (this was in 2011). I hold it still for a few minutes and then check the screen. It has a message that reads more or less like this: "Satellite signal is too weak, please go to ...


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Due to the uneven mass concentration of the planet, there are no stable orbits in which satellites can be placed which will always be "visible" from the location of your colony. A stable orbit where the satellite does not require constant station-keeping is called a frozen orbit. Due to the various mascons, the gravitational field of Earth's moon is uneven ...


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Geosynchronous satellites use high gain transmitting antennas. And their beams are typically focused to maximize the return on investment. It could be possible the explorers have wandered beyond the boundary of the signal footprint. Many satellite ground stations use receiving dishes, and it is possible to mount the dish to a frame that is then ballasted ...


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I can give you 2 technical reasons why there could be no reception in your designated desert. 1) Low population, concentrated in few areas. This variant leads to GPS and communications being available only in relatively small areas where people actually live. Did you know that Japan has it's own GPS-equivalent? It's made of just 4 satellites (planned ...


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A nearby twin neutron stars solar system, gravity field and gravitational waves were not kept into account when computing GPS localization of satellites, and compensation systems for localization of satellitare and direct laser communication could not intercept satellites correctly and establish communication. This also prevent laser signals redshift in ...


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Forget interference knocking out your GPS system - see below for the reasoning. If your navigation equipment doesn't work, then it is for something more mundane. Crewman "Butterfingers" McClutz dropped a box of heavy supplies on the GPS receivers and the spare batteries. Crushed them all, with a truly impressive bunch of sparks and fire as the lithium-...


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This is challenging because some lasers go slow (blasters) and others go fast (Life destroying moon that was badly named, even star energy sucking base was bigger) I challenge that the Death Star beam goes slow. You have plenty of time to see the thing form and travel. It ostensibly goes much, much slower than the speed of light. I don't think it's ...


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You've got the tech, but have you got the cash? Some satellite based system such as satellite phones charge you by use. Your colonists may have ran out of data. The catch-22 is that extra gigabytes or satellite time can only be bought online, so they won't be able to browse for a while. They'll be good to go when their internet plan renews - as long as ...


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Poor software design, and choices that you later regret. We have real examples. Remember the Y2K bug? Did you know GPS has a mini-version of that bug, that affected lots of devices in April 6, 2019? That's because GPS satellites uses ten bits to represent datetimes in their broadcasts. They can only represent timespans of about 1,024 weeks. So starting ...


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The dust and sand of your dry world could create powerful discharges of static electricity that would generate bursts of RF that effectively jam the satellites uplink or downlink or both The interference would be similar to a spark gap transmitter.


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This is going to be the most mundane solution to the problem that you're going to get, but it could be as simple as static electricity. Deserts are hot dry environments across which winds can whip up quite easily. These conditions actually make them ideal static electricity generators and it's said that dust storms are strengthened in the desert because of ...


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Solar Storm A solar storm can take out satellites as well as disrupt satellite communication. It could run from a few hours to a few weeks or even destroy the satellite. The 1859 Carrington Event caused the telegraph system to shock operators and even continue running after the power was disconnected. The same event today would take out the power grid and ...


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weird location + past war. say your desert is at some high or low latitude where there just generally aren't a lot of people. the satellite communication network flies at mid to low inclinations where all the people live, but your remote desert colony is out of the way and no/few satellites fly overhead. They COULD pay for a comm sat with a higher ...


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In all honestly, although there are many feasible answers, there is only one true correct answer. Tritium Tritium is one of the best fuel sources in the solar system, by a wide margin. Uranium radioactive and requires massive infrastructure to run. Hydrocarbons have annoying side effects are are some of the least efficient fuel sources for effort put in, ...


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The easiest propellant to make on the moon would be ALICE, or an aluminum nano-power mixed with ice. No need to separate out the oxygen and hydrogen from the water. ALICE Rocket Fuel Tests Another option is to use pure water heated with a nuclear reactor, making a steam rocket. This does not have the specific impulse of hydrogen/oxygen, meaning that it ...


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Satellite signals are purposefully jammed in this area by the owners of the satellites. The desert is territory which is politically hostile to the owners of the satellite system. To prevent persons living in the desert from taking advantage of the satellites (and possibly using their tech against the owners), signals are purposefully jammed by a ...


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