New answers tagged

-1

Quantumn Drive. We exist at all points in the universe at the same time just in different levels of probability (essentially the basis of quantumn computers). You need to change the probability.


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If you cant "Warp" spacetime, what other options do you have. The light speed barrier limits matters interaction at lower than light speeds. All faster than light travel distorts spacetime in it's overall common laws.


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Imagine you've invented some way to carry infinite fuel on what is otherwise an ordinary rocket. You get into orbit, plan a trajectory to Alpha Centauri, fire up the engines, and away you go. At some time you reach light speed, and so there's no point in running the engines any more, because you just can't go any faster, right? No, that's not how it works. ...


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In order to travel faster than the speed of light in normal space you're going to have to revise a lot of current physics. With the rules as they stand the only way to get around the light-speed barrier is to modify space... a warp drive, one way or another. Since as far as we can tell the speed of light is inviolate under the rules as we know them, the most ...


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The weapon technology makes minimal difference. Training, discipline and morale will be the decisive factors in ancient battles, as well as generalship and strategy. A disciplined force with stone-tipped spears and hide shields will massacre a rabble with bronze equipment. Numbers count for something too, but with halfway decent generalship they are not a ...


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Space pump Why waste your time and energy traveling tediously through space? If you want to be somewhere else, just take all the space between you and your destination and move it behind you. It's basically a propeller or jet, but the medium is space itself. Artificial gravity can be achieved by routing a small amount through the ship itself, while ...


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The X Drive. How does an X drive work, it doesn't matter, you are not writing a technical manual. For a story all you need is the rules it works by and a name. Most technology is black box technology to the people that use it, they only understand the rules. Use the name of the inventor that leaves no hint as to how it works. FTL drives are pure fiction, so ...


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All else being equal, the Bronze Army will wipe the floor with the stone- and- leather army. (1) There is the widespread misconception that iron displaced bronze as the material for weapons because it is harder. This is not true. While modern steel, and late-medieval steel, is certainly far superior to bronze, the same is not true of the kind of iron that ...


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Your question is not going to have an answer as posed, because you've already worked out an extremely detailed outline of the story, which is inconsistent with well-established principles of physics. But if all you want is an answer to the more general question posed in the title, then I can think of a couple of general types of possibilities: (1) Wormholes. ...


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For background, this story begins in ... kind of irrelevant to the story... yadda yadda ... Yeah, nobody cares. Or at least, I don't see anything relevant to the question. They have a firm grasp on what we now describe as anti-matter ... to achieve faster than light travel, not by a warp drive, but by literally breaking the light barrier ... clearing the ...


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Two Very Big Ones So leaving aside the technological sophistication of the combatants (just because you use stone doesn't mean you're bad generals/soldiers, and just because you have lots of copper and tin in your region doesn't mean you're more advanced in other ways than the poor SOBs without) there are two BIG advantages I see for bronze warriors over ...


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Perhaps something along the lines of John Scalzi's "Skip Drives" from the Old Man's War novels? The skip drive, as explained several times in the various novels, most completely in book 1, allows for seemingly-instantaneous travel between points A and B. However the ship doesn't move at all, it simply disappears into an alternate universe, while ...


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Let's set the technobabble aside You can name your drive/engine/motor/causal-difference-generator anything you want. It's important (don't ignore it), because what you're really going to do is choose one of the options below (or one of those suggested by my compatriots), pretty much all of which have been used in scifi before, and then apply your unique spin ...


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For centuries Special Relativity reigned supreme. Discovery after discovery supported Einstein's theory. The equations held up. All the energy in the Universe is required to accelerate matter to the speed of light, much less past it. Nobody even bothered to try breaking the light barrier. They just accepted the math as law. Around the turn of the new, new ...


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Your problem is you are too close to what you are trying to set up. Basically you are trying to build a world where a form of faster-than-light (FTL) travel is being developed that end catastrophically. That's simple enough to deal with. You also want to avoid using something like the Alcubierre warp-drive. A concept that is modestly plausible as an FTL ...


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Imagine that all of our existing physics equations are incomplete. In each and every case, the formulae that our smartest minds have discovered actually contain one or more as-of-yet undiscovered components which must be multiplied against one or both sides of the equation to accurately describe reality. Now imagine that the reason that our smartest minds ...


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How about a semi-disposable system? There have been plenty of answers about limits on how far you can push a CPU that basically preclude what you're after. Lets try a different tactic: Go with the massively parallel approach we see in GPUs. You can get an awful lot more instructions per second this way--I believe there are graphics cards now that can get ...


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How about with a pantograph over a radio link. A pantograph is a device to transfer a mechanical motion from point A to point B. One classic use is for a mass-signing machine. (Sign one document, make 100 copies of your signature.) They can then be built powered and electronically controlled. We call this a "waldo" or "remote manipulator&...


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The short answer is that their communication would depend substantially on their writing scheme. Like in our technology, the written message is transmitted first, because it is far easier to transmit than anything analog like spoken language. The more interesting longer question involves the nature of their language. Sign language is not just a series of ...


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The orbiting satellite can use a mirror to reflect sunlight down to the surface. Without a writing system, they must have tremendous memorization ability and the ability to detect fast movement. Otherwise, the amount of information needed to transmit technical information would take too long. Therefore, a mirror (or a set of mirror) would answer the question ...


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Technology is technology: The fact of bronze isn't so much the key here as the reasons WHY one side has bronze and the other doesn't. Having bronze armor and bronze weapons means your state is backed by commerce and industry, logistics and technology. A sophisticated government provides for their army well, and this is reflected in a thousand small, subtle ...


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Yes, it is often possible to run a CPU above its temperature limit as specified in documentation. This may result unreliable work and shorter life span of the CPU but it does not crash immediately. Different individual CPUs from even the same series are likely to have varying ability to work "under stress". For instance, my i7-3960X CPU has the ...


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It all depends on the general and the state. The thing is that, generally speaking, a state with access to more advanced weapons would ALSO have access to more advanced warfare theory and thus that turns into more success in every aspect. Let me give you an example. In the Fallout universe a very well educated man was captured by a tribe of backwards people. ...


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Yes, and they did Not only is it possible, but many Roman catapults specifically were made with bronze and/or brass (not just iron). While bronze may be a bit softer than iron, the ancients were pretty good at work hardening it so that it could have a level of hardness similar to mild steel. Add to this the fact that it was much more resistant to corrosion,...


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In a word, Yes, they can be. It is not necessary however to use metals at all, just an advanced 'catapult'. Consider the trebuchet - only wood, rope, weight and gravity. Highly effective, very low overhead in materials, many could even be constucted on site during a seige. See diagram:


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Based on my experience having designed lots of digital logic over the past couple decades, you can make faster chips. But you can't do it by just running existing chips faster than they were designed to work. You have to come up with faster transistors and circuit designs. You can't do it by just running existing chips faster The heat produced by a modern ...


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I'm going to skirt the obvious, in that this is pretty much the way it went in our own past - You know the outcome. Put it into a different perspective with the ideas of 'Army' size, add the variables of improved and advanced training, tactical strategy, and ability to withstand a battle where attrition is a co-equal foe. "The Art of War" has ...


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Allow me to introduce the ultimate laptop. Current computing hardware is sadly extremely limited by the fact that most of its energy is locked up in the mass of the hardware, leaving a mere trifle available for computation. Efficiencies are made worse by using billions and billions of electrons to represent a single bit. Not so for the best mages! By ...


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combination lock bullets The question has two parts Tracking guns and stoping people from Shooting guns Tracking Tracking is simple, every second a small interior cpu that is integrated to the electric firing pin sends the position of the gun to a local data center. The firing pin must be handled by a Government Official, and if your gun doesn't send a ...


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The great think about magic is that it can do whatever you want it to do. To make today's CPUs run faster, your magic needs to affect physics to: Remove or at least greatly reduce production of heat. Speed up the switching time of the transistors. If you can locally affect how physics work, then both should be possible. Lets say that once the spell is over,...


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Right now the only thing we have in real-life that handles this is humans using sign language. I think this is the wrong model, because the idea is that an entire species is using sign language. I can only guess at some of the evolutionary traits that make sign language better for these beings than voice. However, I'd like to state that sign language has ...


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Working with the premise of someone in orbit communicating in real time with someone on the ground, then they can't reasonably be sending physical written communications back and forth. However for a species to advance to the point of putting someone in orbit, they almost certainly need to have a writing system established (that's a huge part of what allows ...


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Signwriting. In recent years people who use sign language have invented thier own writing system called signwriting. It is a written system of annotating sign gestures instead of phonemes which makes learning to read and write much easier for people who can not hear to be able to correlate sounds with a Phoenician based alphabet. Instead, all of the ...


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As OnoSendai alluded, cloud computing is the answer. Unlike they implied, stealing it is not necessary. Amazon, Google, Microsoft, or any number of lesser-known cloud computing providers, will sell you all the instantaneous computing power you can afford, today, with very little preparation. Exclusive machines not shared with other customers are more ...


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There was a story on the net, many years ago. (Usenet era, I think.) A group decided to see how far they could overclock a 25MHz 486 (or maybe 386). They put the unit in a freezer, and started turning up the speed. It kept working. I don't remember how far they got it stable, but.... At one point, they accidentally pulled all the jumpers and turned it ...


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The same way we are doing right now. We humans technically communicate by sound and body language. In practice, though, many people communicate more by text and emojis than by voice nowadays. If the aliens are smart enough to put stuff in orbit, they should be able to read, type, and select different kinds of reactions for every message they receive on ...


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Via Translations Morse code isn't exactly easy to comprehend but it was used as a simple means of communication to be translated. Your aliens would need a non visual way of sending information that could be translated back into signing for general communication.


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Assuming a visual feed of some kind if available, use that. If not, use a Morse-Code equivalent to represent the correct signs. If it's letter-based, i.e. the sign alphabet, this will be relatively simple; if it's not based on letter but rather uses unique signs for every word, this will be very difficult and thus worth looking into a constructed language of ...


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Yes, but also no, but also yes. Can you design a piece of computing hardware that's designed to run processors until they burn out, at which point you return them? Absolutely. Can you do this for processing-heavy tasks? Yes. But it won't be a CPU. A CPU is a central processing unit. Its main job isn't to do intensive processing, but to do central processing -...


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Quantum Computers This is the basic principle behind quantum computers. They are much much faster than a normal processor at solving for certain kinds of problems, but also much more sensitive to introducing errors over time. Quantum computers can do certain tasks billions of times as fast as the world's strongest super computers using traditional processors....


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In terms of regular CPU's that are created today, not exactly. Today's CPU's can be overclocked either until the point the heat generated by them will fry the CPU or up to the theoretical maximum performance for any given unit of time due to the clock speeds. This also assumes the other hardware in the computer is functioning as fast as the processor. There ...


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In many cases, the limiting factor for CPU speeds is not the fact that they will melt if run too fast, but rather that circuits take a certain amount of time to switch, and if some of the switches that need to switch before some event occurs fail to do so, the CPU will likely produce erroneous results. Additionally, if a circuit that needs to switch off ...


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With a twist? Sure. Let's call it... Zeus' Wish. You pray to the god of clouds, rain, thunder and lightning, and he gives you some valid burner cloud computing credentials. These allow you to utilize AWS server farms on all regions around the globe at 100% processor usage until your credentials are revoked. Best used with algorithms highly customized for ...


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Based on your comment to JBH it sounds like you want a once-off computational device with a real-world analogue that can be offered to eldritch creatures in exchange for a short term power (i.e. magic). To me it sounds like you want to look into measurement based quantum computing (also know as one-way quantum computing). The way this works is that to ...


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The simple fact is that the best CPUs today can't do much more than 8GHz for a top clock speed even if you invest insane amounts of energy in getting rid of the heat they produce, because heat is only part of the problem (it's the only part that actually destroys the CPU though). That's roughly double the clock speed of most modern CPUs, but that actually ...


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Yes, but... Most micros are constructed to be able to theoretically run at substantially more than their rated clock speed. What limits that speed is the micro's construction, and manufacturers actually have little (or at least limited) control over that. On the production line, manufacturers actually test micros to see what speed they can manage, and then ...


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Yes and no Modern CPUs already do what you're suggesting and that's called boost mode, but there are limits that will result in diminishing returns. You will not get 10X as someone else posted. There are multiple failure mechanisms that can cause the CPU to age, which result in reduced performance or outright failure: Electromigration, Temperature-Dependant-...


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Exactly modern grocery bags, no Exactly the same, no. Modern grocery bags are made from very precisely refined polymers which require thermometers to get to the exact properties you would be looking for. Thermometers are a post medieval tech; so, even with a perfect understanding of chemistry, you can not refine elements to exact temperatures without one. ...


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A true universal translator requires omniscience, mostly because "language" is just a societal construct. Say two friends get together (say Jane and Alice) and invent a couple new words so they can communicate in secret without others knowing what they're saying: that's a language (albeit a very primitive one). For the universal translator to ...


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Next to no way. "Plastic" is not a simple thing at all. In medioeval times they might have, relatively easily, obtained casein plastic from milk and acid (white vinegar or diluted muriatic acid). With some ingenuity they might have had formaldehyde, getting methanol from pomace distillation and flowing it over a catalyser (hot platinum wire - ...


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