New answers tagged

2

Depends on the story you want to tell. One realistic option is that they all die of starvation, which you have excluded. No technology beyond the stone age, but certain bits of knowledge like germ theory or Mendelian genetics. Stone age plus, no metalworking but many "practical tricks" like pulleys, wooden wheelbarrows, keystone arches, and crop rotation. ...


0

How far would technology have progressed for them in that time I think you mean "from zero, which is what they started from". It almost completely depends on the planet. First thing they're going to do is find food and shelter. Resources shall have to be dedicated to this. How much, it depends on how easy it is to find food. They will start as hunters-...


0

I think for a crossbow to lead to a weapon as capable an modern assault rifle that they would need to solve the problem of getting the bolt or quarrel to start its stabilizing spin before it leaves the bow string. As others have very rightly observed, with electrical mechanisms they could create very fast firing repeating weapons. The next challenge would ...


0

I disagree with all of this, but I'll answer the question first: People need to eat and be safe from each other and the elements. Agricultural skills (including ranching for sure) and chemistry would be high on the list. Chemists can make gunpowder and fertilizer. Farmers can feed and clothe you. Machinists would be pretty invaluable. they can make or fix ...


3

This is the plot of Gilgamesh the Immortal, where Gilgamesh is granted immortality by Utnapishtim the immortal (in the real Sumerian Gilgamesh saga, Gilgamesh did strive for immortality, but failed to achieve it). Usually just how immortality is achieved is left unsaid; the most popular choices outside magic and magic-like "science" (i.e. a handwavium ...


0

My first thought is: why reject guns. My answer is: war should be about human energy, not chemical energy. This would then also reject any explosives, and anything powered by electricity, water, fire, etc... Having said that, one can imagine a spring in a metal box, that is stretched in the box, and then latched stretched. This can become the stored ...


1

a virus (technological or psychological), how could that signal then infect our technology and then be received by humans? The realistic answer is that it couldn't. It is hard enough to communicate, let alone abuse the communication as in, say, The Astronaut's Wife. In A for Andromeda, thanks to their extensive knowledge, the aliens send several ...


1

Perhaps just sending certain data encoded into the virus RNA might be sufficient to cause mayhem. Assuming that the virus arrived in some way that made it obvious that it was of extra terrestrial origin and that Terrestrial scientists were then asked to study it and discover its contents reading the code could potentially be very disruptive. Step one would ...


5

They are sending (trading? donating?) scientific information. The first is a blueprint for a fusion reactor. People are suspicious, they analyse it, they understand it, and it works. The second is the algorithm to maximize advertising revenue for your social media platform while keeping hate speech away. People look at it, they cannot quite grasp why it ...


3

A technological virus is out of question for nowadays, unless they hack into the internet in a way that only works in Hollywood. However, if this were done in the 70's or 80's it might just work! Back then a lot of computer programs were stored in cassete tapes, the type you would use in a stereo (floppies were a thing, but hadn't dominated the market yet). ...


1

Using a compound crossbow and a pump-action forward grip, you can produce a good fire rate with decent velocity on the bolts. Your warriors will have to work out, but you might get 160 foot-pounds (270 joules), fired once every few seconds, which is nothing to sneeze at. I'm with Keith Morrison that crossbows are not that accurate. William Tell and Robin ...


0

rail gun, they improve the cross bow so much that it is now a rail gun, maybe propel anything


4

If explosive technology exists, then this is a much more complicated question than just "what would crossbows look like". I'm going to preface by saying guns just never happening in a world with explosive technology is super unrealistic, but if somehow the entire human population just turns an eternal blind eye the to idea of guns, I would expect a timeline ...


7

Perhaps the main issue wouldn't be the rejection of firearms, but rather the adoption of crossbows. Between the fall of the Roman Empire in the West and the adoption of firearms in the 1400's, military power depended on highly skilled men at arms (called Knights in the West, but also exemplified by Samurai in Japan and the Janissaries in the Ottoman Empire)....


8

Pump guns or air rifles might become popular. There are guns in assault-rifle format which shoot bolts (or flechettes) with compressed air which are used for special operations missions. Additionally, air rifles, that is guns which fire balls or bullets using the pressure of an air reservoir have been around since the American Civil war. The advantage of ...


12

Self-loading crossbows go back to antiquity, predating the invention of gunpowder, in China. Modern developments along these lines already approach AR capacity with light crossbow power and accuracy. YouTuber Jorge Sprave has even built units powered by a battery drill motor that can continue to repeat as long as there are arrows in the magazine and power ...


2

The issue with crossbows is the loading and powering mechanism. Assault rifles are self loading and the ammo is self powered. With crossbows this is not so easy. There are things like repeating crossbows, but they are still hand powered and not very powerful. Perhaps electricity could be a factor to power the crossbow into resetting the string, or maybe ...


0

If you spoofed the data from weather sats, plus solar and earth observation sats, you could wreak havoc with the agriculture sector and possibly other areas. Fake hurricane warnings, or suppressing the warning of a real hurricane. Imagine a cat 5 hurricane hit the east coast with no warning.


7

Actually hacking a satellite is not the easiest thing. Most use encrypted communications, they will only be overhead for a short while (unless geo stationary) The command and control systems will not be documented, and the existing control infrastructure will be very well secured. Older satellites might be easier (just because threats have evolved) On the ...


22

Trigger nuclear war Hack a military observation satellite and tell it to transmit a signal indicating a nuclear launch by a hostile power. You'll probably need to hit a few concurrently for a convincing signal. After that you just need to sit back and watch the fireworks. Trigger Kessler Syndrome You don't need to knock them out of the sky, you just need ...


-1

Bring the satellites down. Easiest, fastest, most "efficent" way. You might not only bring down a 4 tonnes of mass from 2000 kilometres height. You can also initiate controlled cascade effect practically bombarding earth from orbit. Nuking from orbit is sooooo 1986. If you take down the satellite with one nuke to Iowa or Arizona you not only put nuke to ...


0

Disrupting communications is already extremely damaging to modern day society. Sattelites control a much larger part of technology than you would think nowadays. Even just shutting them off could disrupt parts of the Internet, GPS, telephone, and media communications. All of these systems are more or less crucial for modern society. Disrupting some ...


3

Kill GPS And the rival systems, Galileo, Beidou, Glonass. A breakdown of GPS would lead to a rapid breakdown of logistics and transportation infrastructure. Famine, looting, and civil war follow. Sure, one could organize alternate supply chains. But not on short notice.


4

Aside from orbital platforms armed with nuclear weapons for fractional orbital bombardment, which is an outlawed weapons system by international treaty, satellites lack the capacity to be directly destructive. So maybe hacking communications satellites would enable your nihilistic coders to infiltrate control systems of conventional and nuclear power ...


0

Depends If the laser has a fixed frequency, and the enemy knows what it is, then certain materials may be very effective at reflecting or dispersing it. For instance, a very effective defense against a visible-to-IR laser would be a water balloon. Water vapor absorbs visible frequencies quite effectively, which is why clouds are opaque and white. I would ...


0

A mirror or reflective surface would help. But it will never protect you fully. Basically the worst you can do is wear something that scatters the laser light in a direction of allies. Like DON'T wear white. It will not scatter enough to protect people from being blinded. Which honestly is the biggest danger for humans on the battlefield. A narrow laser ...


6

Reactors are much safer than you think. Only three major nuclear accidents have ever happened on Earth compared to tens of thousands of reactors. Since those incidents, containment protocols have gotten much better. If we have the technology to conduct frequent interplanetary travel, I'll wager we have the tech to generate power safely. Ejecting a reactor is ...


0

Your nanobots, just like living beeings create a new generation any x-lifecycles. They do this to repair, get more numerous- and to pass on instructions- via genedrive. Meaning.. a new nanobot with a brand new instructionset, overrides previous instructions by his ancestors writting over the instructions of the previous generation. So to pass out new ...


11

Flocking behavior. You will not directly control your many drones. You will set a task and the drones will communicate between themselves and figure out how to do it. Like an ant or bird, each drone will have a set of rules that govern its behavior according to its position and motion, the position and motion of the target and the position and motion of ...


2

From a comms perspective what you need is a technique called Multiplexing. This technique has been around since the telegraph and in general terms allows one to share multiple signals on a single 'line'. In the case of your nanobots, this is probably a single wireless channel. The link provided talks about the different types of multiplexing techniques and ...


0

First of all, the turing test sucks. It focusses way too little on detailed knowledge of how humans experience the world, which would be needed to trick a jury that knows what it has to look out for. Passwords, secret codes, loved ones and memories, such as test results, would have to be ignored or not being known to the crew in order for the AI to have a ...


0

Lets call it - whack a mole fusion. You give up on the idea of control on the process. And just whack at spikes of plasma coming near the edge of containment. How this is done? You use a set of lightning-rod lasers (https://ec.europa.eu/digital-single-market/en/news/fet-open-laser-lightning-rod) to 3d print a coil shape on the plasma of the emerging spike. ...


1

The answer: It depends on what you want. Could you make it? Yes, provided you can give the people the required know-how and find somebody willing enough to sponsor the project or earn enough money by yourself. Is it usefull to try and get it? Absolutely not, there are some magnificent guns made throughout the ages with all sort of interesting systems. ...


1

The only thing I know that has the power to do that today is machine learning, meaning by doing an excellent prediction. You could make an analogy between deep learning and high sensitivity. Deep learning prediction is based on learning from slight variation in data in a very complexe way. The ability to make several layers of opaque solid objects ...


4

Major Pyramids and Ziggurats Not just the Giza Pyramids, mentioned by Patricia Shanahan, but also the biggest of the Mesoamerican pyramids, like the Great Pyramid of Cholula, the biggest known pyramid in the world, The La Danta end El Tigre pyramids in El Mirador, and the Pyramid of the Sun in Tetihuacan, all of which are already around 2,000 years old. ...


2

If you will, let's start with some pseudo-biology. We see three colors because we have photoreceptor cells filled with color pigments (red, green, blue) which, when excited, send signals to our brain to be processed as information. The visual signals that are theoretically possible are not limited to these three wavelengths of Electromagnetic radiation (...


2

The Hoover Dam would remain mostly intact, though it'll only be running for a year or two after maintenance stops and zebra mussles clog the coolant intakes


0

Backscatter X-ray as used by the TSA is the best answer I can think of, though I don't really know enough about it to say much as far as how much this could be extended in terms of accuracy. Really the problem is that any kind of EM radiation that is capable of penetrating objects is also highly dangerous, because the higher frequencies that allow one to ...


6

I nominate the Giza Pyramids. They have already survived about 4,500 years without maintenance, and indeed with human destruction in the form of removing outer casing stones.


0

Send a thief to catch a thief: Use an independent AI to examine input and output of a video link and determine whether the far end of the link is an AI.


0

It comes down to how good the AI is at understanding human nature. I'm thinking of one of Saberhagen's Berserker stories--*What do you want me to do to prove I'm Human. Stop." Two small ships, one human, one berserker (AI seeking to destroy all life.) One battleship. The battleship must figure out which is which, the only communication is Morse code. ...


0

Also, the AI are actually AI, not Androids. They run on supercomputers and because of that do not look human or have locomotion. they can make it look like they have a human body by sending data packets of spoofed video. Detect spoofed video rather than human vs robot. Design the station so that some obvious aspects of the environment are not monitored by ...


1

Virtually all the other answers are impractical for the scenario. Play games with the AI? really? You're going to do that every time you want to ask a colleague a question? Ask personal questions that only the human knows? Germ of a good idea but you'll run out of trivia fast. You need something secure, infinitely reproduceable and practical to perform ...


5

Around the same speed once it crystallizes All natural honey will eventually crystallize if it's just left on it's own, and it'll be even faster at just the right set of degrees. The ocean is around 62 degrees Farenheit, which is just the right set of degrees. Honey crystallization is due to the overabundance of sugar in honey, which makes it delicious, and ...


2

As others have said, every system has gaps, where it is impractical, illegal or impossible to surveil all activity in all points of location and time. It's really not difficult to very easily and inexpensively exploit the weaknesses of even the most expensive camera systems. One of the big ones for cameras is adoption of a sufficient level of video ...


1

Managed Uncertainty through Non-compliance Police will have tons of public cameras all over the place, but as an honest, hard working slumlord, keeping cameras in my public areas is too expensive. Oh, the government is willing to pay for the installation? Err... I ment they cost to much to maintain. Oh, they pay to maintain them as well... what I meant to ...


0

You really need to define "human" here. I suspect the flesh and blood definition will do in your case (on the other hand, maybe you want to distinguish artificially created organic humans from naturally born humans, which is a different kettle of fish). If that's true, the only test that suffices is to test the physical being, is it flesh and blood, or not?...


1

So I would first start making dry runs of my escape. Look for camera gaps that do exist and use those to adjust my movement and my appearance. Some may have to be improvised but gaps will happen... suppose a camera on the street is opposite a trash pick-up sight on a crowded street. Dip behind the garbage truck, change appearence, and go in a different ...


0

This is magic. Magic always has a price on the wielder. The mirror uses energy of the invoker. It takes 1 calorie/minute per square inch of both mirrors. So a pair of 2x2" mirrors have 8 square inches. 1440 minutes per day. It takes 12,000 calories per day to keep it running. This is doable. Pre-chainsaw, a lumberjack would eat 6-8 thousand calories ...


0

There is a big technology monopoly. Everything is interconnected. And then one of the parties released the computer virus. It took down all technology, power plants, hospitals. Knowledge was gone, houshold appliances didn't work anymore, autonomous farming died out, people had no food. No technology could function without the cloud. And the cloud was ...


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