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4

Possible, and the other answers miss how ice can "contain" energy. As water freezes, dissolved salts predominantly remain in the liquid phase. If you melt this ice, the resulting water will be relatively pure. Now it turns out that for entropy reasons, you can extract energy from mixing pure water and salty water. Hence, we may have an animal that lives ...


0

This creature could "eat water", although water would not be what provided its energy. It could break down the water into hydrogen (used as a fuel), and oxygen (used as an oxidizer). It could have a digestive system more like the fuel consuming machines we have. it separates the hydrogen from the oxygen via electrolysis, with the electricity coming from ...


4

There are two concerns here: Energy and Materials. Energy Is covered pretty well by @Willk. I just want to reaffirm that the bonds in water could be used to both break and make the bonds of ATP depending on the enzymes at play. Materials However, I think the bigger issue is materials. The average human is made of Carbon (20 kg), Ammonia (4 L), Lime (1.5 kg)...


1

Unlikely. Water does react chemically with many compounds. Alkaline metals, some halogens and certain compounds are the exceptions. Of those, only fluorine can make a plausible atmosphere that a creature can breathe to oxidize water. But free water would not be able to coexist with fluorine atmosphere over long periods of time. As @puppetsock pointed out, ...


16

It is extremely unlikely that there would be such a biochemistry. Water is very stable molecule because it's the "ash" of burning hydrogen, so there isn't much energy left in the molecule that can be liberated. Now, you can oxidize water as fuel, but to do so you need an extreme superoxidizer, such as chlorine trifluoride*. But when you get into chemicals ...


8

Is an alien biochemistry possible which consumes water for energy? In theory, you could have a biochemistry that used fluorine in the way that we use oxygen. Fluorine reacts with water to produce hydrofluoric acid, oxygen and some energy, so such a metabolism could "eat" water. Thing is though, you'd get a lot more energy eating pretty much anything else... ...


2

The alien would have to have a very different chemistry to ours. And live in a very different environment. Quite radically different. There are some chemicals that can react with water to release energy. It is just barely possible that such a chemical basis could support an organism. Under the right circumstances, for example, various metals will take the ...


24

Plants consume water for their energy metabolism. Water is more than a solvent for a plant. It is one of the 2 raw materials they use to make sugar. The formula for photosynthesis is CO2+H2O+ light -> CHO (sugar) + O2. Plants do chemistry on water molecules, splitting the H2 from the O to trap the incoming energy from light. Without water chemistry ...


0

They would have to have a very thin and flexible beak or tongue specifically evolved to eat bone marrow, since it is inside the bones. The new organ would have to produce specific enzymes that would needle the hard bone to reach the bone narrow inside it.


0

If your players are just trying to figure out their profit that's a bit easier than crop yields. Throughout D&D systems, land was valued at the profit it could produce in a 5 year period. Typically farmland is valued at 50 gp/acre, meadow land is similar. So 2500 acres x 50 gp / 5 years is 25,000 gp/year or 68.5 gp/day. (note that this is the profit ...


6

Potatoes are a total game changers. "Many researchers believe that the potato’s arrival in northern Europe spelled an end to famine there" according to a piece in the Smithsonian*. It is even argued that the far greater productivity gave rise to the age of empires. If you have the climate - like Ireland - you can get rid of the labor-intensive business of ...


0

Eugenics...on themselves...to change their dietary need.(gives some interesting possibilities of this solution being implemented without general consent and the associated exploration of social manipulation) Long term solution, but it took a long time to get into the predator/prey debacle. Slowly introduce non-prey based materials to supply some nutrition ...


1

Consider insects, or better yet, jellyfish, which "has no brain, nor a heart" (and has more DNA tricks up its sleeve: https://www.nytimes.com/2012/12/02/magazine/can-a-jellyfish-unlock-the-secret-of-immortality.html ) Your Romans may be also able to breed - or discover - a brainless mutation of a meaty organism (that may be considered invasive and ...


0

Amputation. Like the old farmer said, "A pig that good, you don't eat all at once." Maybe your aliens will be lucky enough to develop a taste for skinks or some other animal that can regularly discard pieces of their body.


0

They could somehow "legislate" or form a binding consensus that the prey animal has a "right" to a finite lifespan. So they would never kill the prey animal below a certain age. Similarly, they could form a consensus that the prey animal should be killed humanely, or only in their sleep. They would discover that the prey animal could be put under the ...


7

I am not an expert but I did find a few things. Everything I found is about grains, specifically wheat, rye, barley, and oats. I tried to find things on the other plants you asked about, but could not find anything I deemed of use. I don't know if what I found will be of any use, but here it is: The most common means of calculating yield was the number of ...


0

There are some good answers here already, so I can only think of one thing that hasn't been mentioned yet. While you've specified the intelligence level of the predators, you haven't specified the intelligence level of the prey. Are the prey at a point of being able to communicate with the predators and sympathize with their problem? There are some vampire ...


2

Animistic philosophy In animistic cultures, Humans had the understanding that they weren't different from other animals, it was natural to them to consider any living creature of the forest as their peers, but still, they always have been hunting. Our anchestors weren't vegan nor vegetarian, meat has always had an important share of the diet of our hunters-...


3

Milk and blood. https://basia.typepad.com/india_ink/2007/09/got-blood.html Depicted - Maasai with some blood to eat. Your carnivores stick to proteins from their prey animals. They just consume proteins that it is not difficult for these animals to regenerate and so the animals do not need to die. Examples from our world are milk and blood. Milk is of ...


4

Farm carrion Someone made the point that eating animals who naturally deceased is morally acceptable, but it can't be done on an industrial scale because carrion is hard to find. Yes, it can be done on an industrial scale. You farm end-of-life animals. You create prey-animal Paradise. They have a good life. Several times a day, you move the herd to ...


1

The best way to save life it to maintain the natural order. Carnivores are essential to maintaining a healthy herd. In the wild, wolves, lions, etc. only catch the weakest, sickest, & oldest members of the herd. This prevents the herd from being overrun by genetic disorders, diseases, and from overgrazing. Being an herbivore is so "easy", they need ...


0

Make the herd animals intelligent. The dragon guards the herd from predators in return for a monthly sacrifice that dragon uses as food.


6

Most animals actually have very similar nutritional requirements, at least with respect to what nutrients they need, if not exactly how much of each. However, obligate carnivores must eat meat because there are nutrients their bodies cannot synthesize, so in the absence of the ability to manufacture these nutrients industrially, they must get them directly ...


5

They might be able to domesticate and farm a species of animal that can shed and regrow parts of its body, like lizards with their tails in our world but on a larger scale, and then subsist on the shed body parts. It’s conceptually similar to keeping animals for milk or eggs, but you get meat instead of dairy products.


3

Soylent Green Of course it has well known issues, but we'll ignore Kuru and the like for the moment. Soylent green has the advantage of acting as both waste disposal and food supply. The supply of high protein meat based food matches the population level, and while it of course won't fully supply a population it will act as a supplement to other available ...


0

Short version: they don't have to If your species is sapient (that seems like this is the case from the wording of question), they should be able to figure out a way to achieve their goals. Assume the following guidelines are established: The species do not possess the technological advancement necessary to cultivate their food artificially, they rely on ...


46

I will point to the Yellowstone Park and use it as a comparison. The population of wolves in the area of the US around Yellowstone Park was completely erradicated. Compare this situation to your carnivores. In your case, your race decides to stop hunting. In the case of the wolves, they are no longer able to. The population of deer and moose around ...


34

Sacred Prey Your obligate carnivore species is going to have a complicated relationship with their prey species. On the one hand, animals are aware and can feel. On the other hand, your carnivores cannot survive without feeding on those animals. As your carnivore species evolves they are going to have to find a way to reconcile these two facts. The easiest ...


16

They could become carrion eaters and only eat animals which died a natural or accidental death. This might not be a good base to support a large, centralized population, though. If you want to support a large population, you need to produce food on an industrial scale. That means you need a food source which is reliable, planable and scalable. Scavenging ...


10

Carnivores that rely only on eating meat are known as obligate carnivores. Cats are an example. They cannot thrive or survive without meat. While obligate carnivores might be able to ingest small amounts of plant matter, they lack the necessary physiology required to digest it. Plant cells are more difficult to digest than animal cells because they have ...


20

for alternative food what about a diet consist of only the unfertilize eggs. so far as i check pure carnivore can eat egg. and here some further information like nutritions from wikipedia link, and maybe some information there can help. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Egg_as_food#Nutritional_value so just breed any egg laying animals like chicken,duck,or ...


24

I would like to present a frame challenge. Sapient obligate carnivores WILL NOT decide to stop eating meat. There is going to be a distinct difference in the psychology of such a species compared with humans. Even if they are a social species capable of bonding and empathising with their domesticated animals, the species still sees them as their sole ...


14

Members of their clergy (or other guardians of public health) could use selective breeding techniques (favoring the least intelligent members of the animal population) to produce herds which express fewer obvious signs of sentience. Then, once the creatures have reached some a certain level, they could be declared officially non-sentient so that the ...


4

Genetically Breed or Engineered Probiotics Poop is not generated only from food. You also poop out dead cells and other waste in the body; so if you don't eat food you will still have to poo. What you need is a way to not only handle not only undigested food (which is often undigested because the body doesn't / can't process it!), but also to handle waste ...


6

I would suggest having the bean function as a pseudo-parasite. Once the bean has entered the digestive system and been moved to the appendix, the unusually high concentration of bacteria and other life-forms causes it to 'awaken'. It attaches itself to the walls of the appendix and sprouts roots into the blood stream, somehow cleverly warding off any ...


7

Why not make it that it absorbs water and expands in the stomach, then gradually dissolves over a period of years, releasing nutrients to be absorbed by the small intestines? The expansion means that it won't leave the stomach, and the nutrients, in liquid form, are absorbed into the body, so no waste is left behind. This does not obviate the need for ...


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