New answers tagged

1

They’d be filter feeders that eat highly dense pollen. The transhumans you describe sound very much like the Astomi from Orion’s Arm. They’re filter feeders who live in specialised space habitats that include plants that produce large amounts of pollen that they feed upon. They do this by using a layer of fine hairs that cover their bodies that collect an ...


0

This is not realistically possible, unless your transhumanism includes serious cybernetics, in which case "breathing" would stop being a thing anyway. The vast majority of the food you digest serves as fuel. Your body reacts this fuel with an oxidizer taken from the air to provide the energy you need to survive and maintain the high activity of an animal. ...


5

The current atmosphere is just fine As you're aware, plants are mostly carbon, and they get it entirely from carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. They get extra nutrients from the soil, but in much lower quantity. Since you allow drinking, you should be able to enrich the water with all the minerals needed. Clearly trees exist, so the mechanism for converting ...


1

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Radiosynthesis_(metabolism) - "eat" PU238 once every 20 years or so, the stomach equivalent produces melanin which, in its activated metastable form, is circulated by the blood stream to carry the necessary energy into the cells. Biochemistry is no longer needed as a source of energy, all the other supporting processes are tuned ...


2

This will be a massive undertaking, and is probably not economically viable enough. As other answers pointed out, saturation the entire atmosphere with nutrients is near impossible, and a gigantic inefficient waste. But even if it can be done, this will not negate the need for food production, as the nutrients will still need to come from somewhere. This ...


10

While possible, I don't think that a society of transhumanists would do what you're proposing as it would be a massive waste of resources. Saturating the entire atmosphere with enough "nutrients" to make it practical for transhumans to use would be a colossal effort and probably completely destroy all native ecosystems. Most air never gets inhaled by humans ...


0

Have you thought about making these humanoids undergo photosynthesis? That way, they can get many of their nutrients without even the need for air, just sunlight. I'm no biologist, but it seems like your people would then only require water and the air we know. Furthermore, it seems like your second point counters any issues that might arise. EDIT: As you ...


1

Frame challenge! Limited diet of regular old stuff is not interesting enough. Your city dwellers should get all caloric needs met by food grown in the subterranean vats. They could call it "vat". Spices, though, come in any and every variety - including super esoteric things that we would not consider spices like sap, burnfur, gall, birch, and so on. ...


3

Salt. Salt is fairly useful if not crucial to life, and might be incredibly rare in your setting. Currently, two most common ways to extract salt, is firstly through the evaporation of sea water. With you stating seafood is rare, this might not be a readily available option. The other is by mining, but unless your city is conveniently sitting on a huge salt ...


3

There were no restaurants as such in medieval Europe (just odd bakeshops and vendors for working types who could not get home to eat). The concept was quite alien to them. You would have to work extremely hard to build any sort of clientele -- those with the money would much rather be in their own grand homes, those without cannot afford to eat there. That, ...


2

I think we're looking at this wrong... The thing to do is bring some of your own produce (stuff that can be grown locally) and focus on culinary traditions that would be unfamiliar to the area. I'm going to assume you're in England (partly because they are notorious for poor cuisine) for my examples, but similar ideas should apply anywhere. Simply serving ...


2

Site your restaurant in a seaport; and make friends with shipowners and sea captains. They eat free all year round, if they add a few sacks of rice, dried fruit or meats, or spices to their cargo, or (for only the fastest ships ... maybe favours from the Navy) fresh oranges from Seville or bananas (picked green) from West Africa. Especially if they travel ...


3

There hasn't been a lot of innovation in cooking techniques, and preservation is mostly needed to have things year-round rather than in-season. The big difference is transportation. We take for granted meals combining ingredients that don't grow within a thousand miles of each other. If you're attempting to recreate modern american food in medieval Europe,...


7

I suggest making your restaurant an ice cream parlor. Most modern food preparation techniques were used in the middle ages. They did not have microwaves, but steaming or putting something to stand near the fire could get similar results, just slower. It was certainly possible to create foods similar to modern ones if the ingredients were available. To see ...


5

Considering @In the name of the story’s update that the protagonist has modern refrigeration and transportation available to him/her, the only barrier should be the fact that many food ingredients would not be available in the place where the restaurant would open in. Assuming that the restaurant will open in Medieval Europe (as that’s what most people think ...


11

There was no refrigeration in the Middle Ages. So ingredients had to either be sourced locally, or preserved in some way. So no fresh oranges in Stockholm, for example. The next problem you have is that some ingredients haven't been invented yet. Just as an example, look at all the different kinds of pepper the hot pepper community has invented in it's ...


2

As you've pointed out, even in the modern age there are a lot of competing opinions and vague studies regarding nutrition and optimal physique, and it seems likely that a similar cacophony of standards would arise around the system you describe. It could be helpful to address a couple of additional questions about your organ: How sensitive is the ...


3

To answer your question, I will split my answer into 3 distinct types of mages, the Domestic, Combat, and Wanderer mages. Domestic Mages Domestic mages will have access to food supplies when needed, and thus only need to consume as much food as the magic that they use. Also, domestic mages will be mainly decided based on the capacity of their magic organs, ...


1

The Griffin can store water in its feathers, it flies to a nearby lake, immerses itself, then carefully flies back. The Sandgrouse is a type of pigeon that purposefully carries water in its feathers for its Chicks. The Chicks then 'milk' the carrier (either male or female) by sucking water from its feathers. ^Image of a Sandgrouse gathering water The same ...


0

All you get is light and a large enough peace of soil + water & some seeds. If you dont grow food for air and food you will starve and die. If you eat your seeds - you will die. Its basically a miniature world to be robinson crusoe in..


2

The griffin has enough limbs to be able to carry a bucket to the nearest river or lake, fill it and fly back. If it's a big griffin maybe it can carry enough in one trip to provide a day or more water for the lord. The problem would be getting the water into the cell... You can have a hole in the door (or bars) big enough to get a meal through without too ...


6

Ask tribute to the locals The lord not only controlled the castle, but also the whole region around it, and all the yokel that live there. The griffin does not only control the castle, but also (even if it's less than the lord), the region. He can probably ask to one of this folk to gather some water and deliver it to the lord. Same can be done for food, ...


2

You do realize that he's probably going to need water for more than just drinking, yes? If the griffin wants to keep him alive, that means taking into account basic hygiene, and that needs water.


2

If his food contains enough water, he doesn't actually need to drink. Maybe the griffin brings him mostly fruits and vegetables.


48

In medieval times, this was given quite a lot of thought as castles were designed in most cases to survive a siege. Food is an issue during a siege to be sure, but water more so; this ties into the law of 3s; you can survive 3 minutes without oxygen, 3 days without water and 3 weeks without food. These are of course approximations, but you get the general ...


12

A number of options. The castle has a well within its walls so the lord can toss a bucket down and get water for himself. A more modern castle might have hand pumps in appropriate places so maybe no need for a bucket. Assuming the castle isn't in a very dry region, rain could be collected from the roof and fed directly to cisterns, from which the lord can ...


5

It will depend on the variety of popcorn and the prep method. Some varieties will by hybrid that won't breed true. Depending on the specifics of that, you could get a sad little bit of corn in the next generation that has about 3 kernels on each cob. It may be that you can plant several generations and get something useful out of this. Or it may be that it ...


11

The reason why certain variety of corns are used for popping is in the specific properties of the seed (you need a proper shell permeability and a proper humidity of the core to pop it). All the rest is perfectly viable for general purposes nutrition. You might have additional risks due to the limited genetic variety, but that's applicable with any ...


5

The harvesting and selling of a humaniod by-products sounds like it would fall under the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service(APHIS). More specifically The Lacy Act which, "regulates the trade of wildlife and plants and creates penalties for violations." While The Lacy Act doesn't cover bi-product distribution and ...


1

You need to read this "What If?" post on XKCD which speculates on the possibility of a mole of moles. Your Earth sized humanoid is larger than a mole of moles but the principle is the same, and pretty hideous. It will collapse under gravity to form a hideous sphere of rancid bubbling meat, heating until the decomposer bacteria die off and then going into a ...


0

There's a video game called Xenoblade Chronicles where people on two giants, one called Bionis with organic lifeforms and the other called Mechonis, with mechanical lifeforms. It's a really good game I'd recommend checking it out. Take into account the environment on this dead human. Is there organic life, plants, fauna? How do people breathe? How does time ...


1

Earth is roughly spherical and yet we see many different variations in living conditions. The sphere we live on enables a roughly even distrubution of attributes (e.g. water, air, gravity) which enables plant life and animal live to thrive and move around. Instead of Mt everest imagine a mountain 200 miles high, most of which would have not atmostphere. If ...


2

Yes. Even if the earth sized human was dead it would take an extremely long time for the rest of its gargantuan body to realize that. Basically as long as you had an atmosphere,a source of oxygen (algae mats in water and trees adapted to draw on the blood of the gigantic humanoid) and food;of which there is plenty assuming means of harvesting it. Then yeah,...


3

if the earth itself turned into a dead immortal human We are talking of an earthquake of magnitude screw you in the Richter scale. I don’t think human survive. The end. OK, humans are saved by magic. There is a planetary size undead human. So yay! What happened to all the plants? Without any ground to take nutrients from… if they are any around, they are ...


2

Sure, if backed up by an entire ecosystem. You'll need rain, or at least rivers or aquifers for water (blood aquifers probably won't work, too salty). So is the body surrounded by water somewhere that can evaporate and fall? You'll need plants. Human's can't go pure carnivore, you'll get scurvy and other nutritional deficiencies (if they could dig to ...


4

You got humans! No, seriously - think about this. We can eat basically anything on this big, weird world of us with proper preparation. What we can't eat right away, we can find ways to cook and make it edible. We already use stuff like coal, petroleum, and even wood. It is just a matter of time before we start making food directly out of carbon via some ...


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