New answers tagged

2

Your question boils down to describing the gravity along the radius of an empty shell, and gets an answer in a basic lecture on gravity The sphere's interior(where I am envisioning their habitation region exists)? By the shell theorem, inside a shell the gravity given by the shell is null in every point, assuming an uniform distribution of mass. ...


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Uranus. Slower escape speed among the 4 gaseous giants of the Solar System. Attractive feature: helium-3 and deuterium to produce semi-aneutron fusion The energy density of this fusion is on the order of 353 trillion joules per kg. The deuterium-helium-3 fusion produces 24% of the X-ray energy '' 20% '' and 4% in neutrons, leaving 76% of the 353 trillion ...


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Magnetic confinement seems to be a fairly common suggestion and would work in the technical sense, but the amount of energy actually required to magnetically confine an asteroid worth (over the lifetime of the "mine") would be extraordinary. This is particularly concerning given that the containment field would not only have to contain the antimatter under ...


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The IPM near Earth is 5 particles/cm^3. If we assumes this is 5 hyrdogen atoms we won't be far wrong. First, lets do some Feynman math to see how plausible this is. Everything is about as dense as water, give or take an order of magnitude. A water-density object that weights 1000 tonnes (or $10^6$ kg) is going to be about 10 meters on a side. Solar ...


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Explore the constraints: limited space, limited land use, limited life support, limited people, limited options. So you have a finite number of people who each represent a significant investment (from someone), prospecting on mostly useless land (unless your terraforming went "viral" already) and using up energy and resources. There are analogies to ...


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Which entity founds the colony matters: if it is a corporation the end result will be something like the India Trade Company. The Board of Directors decree and the employees obey. The only way to influence the government/corporation is to buy enough shares to create a strong voting block and be able to choose the CEO and the Board. If it is the government ...


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The situation has parallels to a homeowners' association, whether for a co-op, condominium, or standard form of ownership. In particular, there are groups with different priorities: The investors want to uphold their long-term vision for a good rate of return on the follow-on colony(ies). The colony leaders want to grow and operate the colony. The ...


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Manipulate dust with electric field First, shield the asteroid from further interaction from interplanetary matter as explained by other answers. Then, make it electrically charged using positrons. We can make positrons (anti-electrons) even with today's technology because they are product of one type of radioactive decay. Then, if there is any surface dust,...


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This really doesn't seem feasible. I don't have hard numbers, but matter/antimatter annihilation is so incredibly energetic that this object wouldn't really have its own trajectory. any deviation in speed from the background medium would immediately be corrected by the increase in collisions on the front side. that means the object almost certainly wouldn'...


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One thing which other posters have not mentioned is the effects of the interplanetary medium on the asteroid and mining operation. Before you can do anything, it would be very wise to "clear" the area around the asteroid. A massive "wake shield" in an orbit slightly ahead of the antimatter asteroid will create a zone of extremely hard vacuum behind it, and ...


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You're not really mining, more like controlled exploding. There is no real extraction just cutting off usable chunks. to do that you just throwing normal particles at it, a superfine stream of low pressure hydrogen will cut this thing like a high power laser through styrofoam. An electron gun or ion gun will cut better than any laser for very little energy ...


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How exactly would one go about mining an asteroid made of antimatter? In short: Laser ablation to blow off parts of the object. The laser can be put in orbit around the body, without physical contact with it. Channel the plasma to the "box". The produced plasma can be channeled via a suitable magnetic field into a magnetic storage. Again, no physical ...


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Similar question but with a moonfull of antimatter. Is it realistic to have a moon made of antimatter? My proposition there: Cut some chunks off. You can do this using a laser. In the linked moon scenario you would have to blast stuff up and away from the moon because it would be too dangerous to approach. Your smaller chunk is more tractable in that ...


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Unfeasible due to frame challenge If the thing is coming into the solar system, it is in a flyby trajectory. Deceleration due to contact with the interplanetary medium will reduce its velocity in two directions: Radial out: this will rotate the orbital path, but not change it enough to have an apoapsis (and therefore cause a capture); Retrograde: this can ...


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There are two general requirements - power and space. Power 1,000,000 humans need about 2,000 calories per day each plus energy for day-to-day functions. Total up the calories and convert it to something workable, and we have a total of 96.85 MW. That is a lot, but that pales in comparison to energy. The average US household uses 900 kWH per month, giving ...


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No Real Change is Needed Objects inside a space station are eventually going to come to "rest" assuming your space station has an atmosphere. Drag is going to slowly rob your boules of momentum, until they hang floating at some position. So the skill aspect of the game is to determine where your boules will end up floating. Bounces - both against surfaces ...


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Guess the length Instead of rolling the ball and have it slow down due to resistance (where you'd need to guess the power of mew) have the ball attached to string with negligible elasticity. The target is thrown out with a length and players then have to guess how far by measuring out the string and throwing in the right direction. Maybe there could be a ...


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Underwater boule. The field is a sphere of water, few meters in diameter. The center of the sphere is made clearly visible. The players float in microgravity outside of the water sphere, and launch their balls inside the sphere. Goal of the game is to get as close as possible to either the center of the sphere or to a target ball. Water drag will take ...


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I'm going to start by considering the difference between boules and lawn bowls. In boules part of the principle is to throw the ball directly to target point usually on a surface on which they would not roll well. In bowls one rolls the ball to target point. In both cases the target is a cochonnet or jack "placed" initially by one of the players. For these ...


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A light adhesive ball. Preferably because the ball has a metamaterial surface rather than an adhesive glue-like substance. On earth the balls have a certain resistance with the ground that slows them down upon contact. With an adhesive surface your balls would stick to the surface of the ground as long as you dont throw them downwards too hard and then roll ...


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Cotton balls Something with a high drag-to-mass ratio will quickly slow down and come to an effective stop before it reaches a bulkhead. Cotton balls or similar will work. (Perhaps even marshmallows might work.) This presents a 3-dimensional version of the game, with slight "terrain" based on air currents. Speaking of that, while all unsecured objects in a ...


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Trying to recreate a game intended to be played on a flat surface in a gravity well whilst in a microgravity chamber seems not only futile, but it also passes up an opportunity to create a new game that makes better use of the features of the environment that hinder conventional bowling. My suggestion: orbit bowling. Set up the court by placing the target (...


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Overhand throw. Petanque generally implies a underhand toss, and the ball describes a gentle parabola as initial upwards trajectory is converted to downwards via gravity. In your space game the ball is thrown with an initial downwards trajectory, in a manner akin to a cricket pitch. As in petanque, the place where ball makes contact is the player's play. ...


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Finesse population. I am struck by /a significant enough population in the game so the population of a sector isn't decimated in a single fleet battle / If a consequence of a fleet battle is deaths on the planet surface (!), I do not think a population of 5000 will be instrisically more resistant than a population of 500,000 as regards this sort of death ...


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For the sake of convenience let’s start with the assumption that your population will desire a North American urban population density and a globally averaged diet. The city of Austin TX has approximately 1,000,000 residents and a surface area of approx. 800 km^2, for a density of about 1,250/km^2. The City of New York (5 boroughs) NY also has a surface ...


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As Henry Taylor said, post scarcity cultures have different needs. Two approaches: What they will clamor for vs. what they should be getting if they knew what was good for them. They will clamor for, and be willing to pay for, novelty. Possibly based on reconstituted samples, computer-regenerated-via-DNA-files, or holograms digitally beamed across space. ...


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To be frank, for a civilization that has established routine space travel, I don't see that the colonies can really offer anything that Earth would want, apart from tourism and rare luxuries like exotic foods. For an industrial civilization, you need three things to create wealth: Raw materials, energy, and human effort. For a civilization that has ...


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Aren't most Golden Age Sci-Fi worlds post-scarcity? With asteroid-mining, robotic-manufacturing and first-world-everywhere-population-control, won't we have outlived the need for economics? If so, then all that the mother world would want is the art, music and poetry of the child world, shared freely in exchange for their own art, music and poetry. ...


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A Trade in Antiques and Trinkets The now advanced earthlings want relics of the stone ages. But they destroyed the ones on their planets long ago. These are just regular items of use for the people colonizing the backward planet, who have fashioned much of their wares from the spares of the terraform kits and the ships etc that carried them. So, rich ...


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Resources Same thing every colonizer wants, resources. This may be in iron, wood, slaves/employees....just resources of any kind. Maybe just clean air and water. Tourism is a possibility too. Earth's people/corporations will have some scarcity that they don't or can't get from Earth (or the solar system). To satisfy that demand, they will naturally go ...


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It can last some millenia. The eletronics will be long gone, the plastics will be brittle and the plutonium core won't work (but it can still kill you, plutoniun hates you). The solar panels will be broken and it's pieces will be somewhere nearby. The things that can destroy the rovers are stones moving around, dragged by water as the water cycle ...


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As Mars stands now, probably centuries. Maybe millennia, or even indefinitely. Mars lacks most of the weathering mechanisms Earth has: there's no oxygen so nothing oxides (rusts), there's no water, and while dust storms are fast and kick up a lot of tiny particles, the low atmospheric pressure means that there's simply not a lot of force behind those winds. (...


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Hundreds of (Earth) years at least Reasonable quality solar cells on earth are likely to still be able to produce some electricity after one hundred years. NASA would not skimp on a critical component which is comparatively cheap, so I suggest that Opportunity's solar cells are very likely to be still functional in a hundred years if the dust were cleaned ...


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