New answers tagged

2

Does your time traveler remember any basic algebra from high school, such as the Cartesian plane and solving simple equations? If so, then congratulations. Your traveler is armed with the mathematical equivalent of a nuclear weapon for Roman times. He can solve with ease problems that would have baffled the great Archimedes or Euclid. As soon as he can ...


4

Concubine. Your traveler is startlingly beautiful by standards of the ancient world. No pockmarks from childhood smallpox. No chronic deformities. Perfect teeth and a ready smile. Excellent haircut, soft blond hair, smooth skin and a little bit of cosmetic surgery. Your traveler is in good shape from working out in a gym yet has soft hands. Also your ...


5

The first thing your time traveller will do is: a) die of dysentery or some other water borne disease; or b) be patient zero of a plague that wipes out a large proportion of the city he is in. Assuming he manages to avoid the above, the best thing to do is become a healer. As long as he makes a name for himself, he will be allowed to join the temple of ...


1

Not a complete answer but I think the most is gained not by learning a complete trade, but learning the most advanced technology at the time and building further on that. I can develop a new type of orthesis for example, and I dont have to know the exact way to extrude the metals, create the plastics or operate the 3D printers. I am required to have enough ...


-1

Alchemist Basic chemistry knowledge means you can develop gun powder and any emperor is interested in military power. Medical training (or even basic first aid) means you can save millions of lives. Geography means you can find new lands for trade and conquer. Gambler Knowing the outcomes of sporting events would allow you to amass a fortune. Sure we don'...


-1

no.1 I would say build something like a steam engine. I am aware of how hard is to build one, but I think a turbine engine would be easier to make than a piston engine and would be conceivably revolutionary. of course before this the person would need to be rich enough to build this, and that could be accomplished by running a normal business of the time. ...


0

Here's a thought- have a few trials where your device blinks out of time/space for a set period with a beacon, each trial being a different length of time. Acquire that signal upon reentry and begin building a non relative map of the local universe.


17

Brianism On 33 A.D. a man called Brian was recognized by the locals of Jerusalem as the Messiah. He said he wasn't the Messiah, but as one of his disciples attentiously noted, only the true Messiah would deny his own messianity. He was later imprisoned on charges of terrorism and condemned to crucification. Pontius Pilate offered the people the pardon of a ...


0

strategy is based on available resources, so almost nothing from modern warfare could be implemented. Camouflage painting maybe. But historical knowledge of military expert could give to Gary things like: - advanced fortification, both field and long-term - something like spanish tertia (offtopic - I tried to recreate it in M&B PoP, if ya know what I ...


0

The book On Killing: The Psychological Cost of Learning to Kill in War and Society - and this video - reports that: 90% of rifles found dropped at the Battle of Gettysburg were loaded. This and other evidence indicates an innate human resistance to killing, manifesting in not shooting when they have the chance, or not aiming when they shoot. Modern armies ...


2

Gustavus Adolphus brought the concept of COMBINED ARMS to the old world. Same weapons as everybody else, but a different way to organize and train and fight that made combat more effective at the unit level. Also, sci-fi author H. Beam Piper liked using real battles in his time-travel (heh) stories. He is worth a look.


0

I am no expert but here are a few things I think modern warfare knowledge might bring: 1) A destruction of arbitrary classes Training, armor, and weapons were often distributed based on societal status. This lead to horribly trained foot-soldiers with insufficient weapons. As others have pointed out, this also resulted in very useful tools like crossbows ...


2

To take a full profit from our modern warfare knowledge, Gary would need: knowledge of the warfare theories (Sun Tzu and Clausewitz, for example), knowledge of past battles and used tactics (review of what was done, why, and what was the outcome would be profitable), knowledge of the technology/tactics and troops available to him (nice and great to know ...


3

To our modern minds, reading medieval military history can be quite puzzling as often the kings and armies involved don't behave as we'd expect them to if they were trying their hardest to "win the war" as we'd imagine they'd want to. A modern theory of warfare is to seek out the enemy on the battlefield, destroy their army, leave them defenseless, and then ...


3

There have been a lot of good answers on where modern warfare theory can help, and where the technological limitations are overbearing. Eg. Logistical, manpower and financial issues of large warhosts and prolonged military campaigns. I would like to point out the distinct differences between tactics, strategy and grand strategy. Eg. is your setting of ...


8

Modern tactics would be probably of less use than knowing historical tactics. There were a bunch of effective ideas scattered across Middle ages and early Renaissance, that work with medieval resources. Just some ideas off the top of my head: Make your peasants performing some basic training all year long, so they are more fit and skilled when the time ...


4

It seems to me reading the existing fantastic answers that in order to successfully establish any sense of modern military tactics in medieval Europe you must first shore up the shamble that is medieval economics and production. A society is built upon its lowest level and so that is where changes should be made. The vast majority of medieval populations ...


30

Lots of excellent stuff here so here is my 2 cents. One of the biggest "modern" warfare things that Lord Gary could adopt that was not very common is the concept of Meritocracy in his army. Throughout history this always seems to present an odd dichotomy, as some of the most terrifying and effective Armies in history had at least a bit of this going on. ...


96

Honestly the 'modern' military theory that would give Lord Gary the biggest advantage would be modern attitudes towards hygiene. It was extremely common in the time period you're talking about for a force to lose more troops to dysentery and other diseases than they lost in actual combat. By taking a very firm attitude towards latrine maintenance and ...


15

There are several relevant Clausewitzian, Jominian, and Machiavellian concepts that would benefit Lord Gary. While some of these seem obvious to us, recall that most wisdom seems rather obvious in retrospect. Clausewitz: War is an extension of politics, and wars have political goals. Putting 'war' in the 'politics' box doesn't reduce war, it expands the ...


0

Modern warfare requires modern weapons/tools. So... many tactics, formations and most rules do not apply because neither enemy nor they themselves do have the tools to make them useful. What would come in handy would be the modern training methods, ranking system, execution of commands/discipline and how supply chains are set up. Also, many 'modern' ideas, ...


6

I'm no expert, but here's my 2 cents. I think in terms of organization and logistics Gary would be ahead of the rest. If Gary knows modern warfare he might also know the entire history of warfare that happened after the middle ages. Gary could take inspiration from the battle of Agincourt and deploy many longbowmen in his army for example. Another thing ...


177

The question shows a misunderstanding of why the Middle Ages were medieval. It's not that the people who lived in those times did not know any better. They did. In particular, they had good Roman books about military strategy, tactics and logistics; for example, they had and they actually read Vegetius's De re militari; the book was copied over and over, and ...


2

I'm not really sure what you mean by modern warfare theory. I'm going to make the assumption that you're talking about logistics, and possibly wargaming scenarios. Logistics could be interesting. Generally, at least in European Warfare, as a soldier you provided your equipment and scavenged off the land(cheating a little with the link here - https://en....


8

would modern warfare theory be useful to Gary against his enemies? How would his medieval army, tactic, and strategy change using only resources available at the time? I am not an expert of modern warfare, but I doubt what we call modern warfare would be of any use in middle ages. Let's look at some of the key points of modern warfare Aerial supremacy and ...


0

Your investment decisions will almost certainly change some stock(s) performance over long terms, but which stocks will be impacted significantly, and in which direction, is impossible to predict. The solution to this problem is to use the same risk mitigation strategies that you would use to invest in the stock market absent any future knowledge: put your ...


0

His sheets, clothes and body are clean! Or at least cleaner.. Rumor has it that ppl didn't wash regularly throughout the year back then. He could have gone to sleep with a pong in the house and woken up to a breath of fresh spring air! To top it off, incase your traveller is having a real brain-fog morning and didn't notice his own house was cleaner, all ...


1

Whether you change the timeline or not in the specific realm (here: the future development of the companies you invested in) depends on the significance of your actions. The more inconspicuous your trade is in volume and manner, the less likely it is to influence that company. This unfortunately limits early investments in companies when they were small. ...


2

The larger the impact, and the longer the time since your change, the greater the divergence from your original timeline. A tricky point about the high level financial market is that we are not talking about a closed calculated system run by a machine that slowly ticks away as time moves on that could be relied upon to arrive at a 'similar answer' if you ...


2

Utterly high Think about it: As you described, You go back 20 years in time to sell your house - your only asset - to invest the money and using your entire savings. Now you are homeless and nearly broke with stocks that aren't worth much for some years to come. Good look with getting support from your family and friends for such foolishness. Surviving the ...


3

100%. The Cosmic censorship principle reveals itself as more than theoretical. [Time travel is inherently paradoxical. How you resolve it in your fiction is up to you. But time travellers are not detected amongst us, and here is my somewhat gloomy speculation as to why.] If you travel back in time and change something, it makes a (finite) part of the ...


0

Look at Volume Using the two stocks you identified : GOOG and FB. GOOG is reading for over USD 1,200 a share, but only around 1 million shares were bought and sold today. FB is trading at USD 180 a share, but 16 million shares are moving. You could look at how much of a splash you make on the timeline by how much money you move to buy in. If you bought in ...


6

0% Simply mine bitcoin in 2009. There are several blocks that, as of today, were mined by unknown people who have never moved the bitcoin. Each block that was mined (every 10 minutes) from 2009-2012 is worth about $500,000 today, and could be trivially mined by downloading a program onto a laptop. Just one day's worth of mining was worth about $70,000,000 ...


2

Possible, but unlikely It's important to consider the fact that investing in the company generally means gaining some fractional control over the company. Investing means you obtain a fraction of the profits for the company, but you also have the responsibility to help make decisions for the company. Assuming that you will be absent for 20 years following ...


4

This is a case for not being greedy. The major tech companies have had big increases in stock price after they went public, and after there were a significant number of shareholders. Buying a hundred shares on the stock market a month after the company went public is unlikely have much effect on its behavior or stock price. If I were using a time machine ...


2

It is possible, but mostly preventable. Most major tech companies were founded by small groups of people with relatively little money. Adding a few hundred thousand dollars early enough on could make you a major stockholder. Even by "doing nothing", your partial ownership of the company could impact the result of BoD appointments, stabilize the value ...


11

Ask yourself. No, seriously, ask yourself. You've got a time travel machine. Why are you asking the internet whether your scheme will work? Go forward in time and ask yourself whether it worked. (To be honest, if you've got access to a time machine and your scope of usage is simply "make some money with the stock market", you've got a critical failure ...


7

100% (from this method). Because you won't be able to sell your house. You're saying you're going to sell your house after time traveling. Thing is, that's not your house, that's the PAST YOU's house, and you won't be able to sell it. Unless your form of time travel encompasses rewinding the entire world time 20 years with you being the only person who ...


1

From a time travel perspective, you wouldn't have any effect because you had always gone back and purchased the shares. There wasn't an original time when you hadn't purchased the shares, and then another modified time where you have. The multiple timelines concept of the movies is a fiction. There is only 1 timeline, and events in the past cannot be ...


2

Yes If your world has allowed for you to find a time travel device then you are able to circumvent rules we normally perceive as realistic, balanced and "fair". The following may happen if you use such a device for personal gain. If you are able to make this time alteration, why should you be the only one? For every person that bends the rules of reality to ...


4

Buying shares would rise the prices at the stock market, although only by a small margin if you invest the price of an average house info a billion-dollar company. This increase could, depending on your time travel model, butterfly into anything at all, but only rather hypothetically. If you want to prevent your investment to influence the share prices at ...


18

Maybe The new owner of your house may have been destined to become a gifted programmer in the company you buy into, if she had only moved out to Southern California instead of buying that house.


51

No Barring the existence of some Illuminati-type organization who watches for people like you, anyway. Most of these tech companies succeeded because they had the good fortune to introduce a service or good into the market at the right time and had the right strategies to defeat all their competitors. It would be difficult to see how an influx of money ...


0

It heavily depends on what kind of time travel you want and how easy it is. But considering that stealing it from a passed or future isnpossible it limits the options. if you truly want to build a safe then you could simply build an inconapicuous container and send it to a point and place in time where no one else is at that point in time. You send two ...


1

If you are going for science-fiction, don't fret too much about realism. You are allowed some considerable degree of fantastic elements - that's what sci-fi is about! If you wish to be 100% accurate, you will never get a novel written (or a tabletop RPG session done, or a videogame developed...). Two of my favorite sci-fi books are The Forever War by Joe ...


-2

No, because FTL doesn't equal time travel. I know, I'm a heretic, but hear me out. Given any inertial frame of reference an object can travel at any arbitrary velocity to a point in that reference frame. Let's make it near-instantaneous, just to get the most absurd results we can. At T0 you hit the button and at T0 plus a few seconds you have ...


2

Use cloning via time travel. Put the ring in a really good safe, close it and pick it up again in future. Come back to time few minutes later today, open the safe and put the ring next to the ring that is already in the safe. Repeat, until you have enough rings that losing one will not be a problem. Scatter them everywhere. Observe the price and value of ...


5

The safe is a self-replicating Von Neumann device. You put the ring in the safe and enter a secret timespace coordinate. The safe replicates 10 copies of itself and transfers the ring into one of the copies. Then all the safes teleport away to random spacetime coordinates in inhospitable locations. At those locations, they replicate again. And teleport. And ...


21

When you are done with the ring, give it to yourself the next time you need it and then when you need it again go back to when you were last finished with it to receive it from your past self. The ring then only exists when you are using it and there's no need to store it at all. If it's stolen while you have it, go back to before that and tell your past ...


6

It's somewhat irrational to worry about theft if time travel is ubiquitous. If the item mysteriously disappears, you can just travel back in time to when it still existed, and take steps to prevent it. Moreover, thieves cannot hide. Every location is space is essentially under surveillance. At any point where some crime occurred, anyone can travel backwards,...


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