New answers tagged

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You shouldn't need to in the first place. Because of (mumble mumble handwave mumble mumble), the universe conserves improbability. Time travel (and, for that matter, inter-universe travel) being an incredibly improbable thing and all, this means that (more mumbling), with the result that you almost always end up in a universe which is almost exactly like the ...


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Technical renaissance: The Engineers, Scientists, Artists, and other creative types will become insanely more productive I'm an engineer who plans to have no children, I build things for fun and profit, and I experiment with things too. Were I to suddenly become a baby but keep my memories, I'll remember all my skills and experiments. I'll remember what ...


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Raid a mental hospital Mind control is routinely used in the future to forbid people with serious mental issues from engaging in dangerous activities. Psychopaths are forbidden to kill or injury people, for instance. People may even voluntarily undergo it in order to stop unwanted habits, or engage in new ones. More subtle uses help people with milder ...


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What made the internet great and drove some of it's tech advancement? How do you get creepy stuff into average joe's household? The answer is sex! Any you don't need it in every household, you just need it in the household of one of the time-travelers. So at least one of the time travellers was into mind control sex games and has the necessary equipment at ...


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Disembodied Humanity By the year 2050 digital consciousness has become ubiquitous. Outside of small groups of bio-Luddites and discontents, anyone who has the means has uploaded their consciousness to the Cloud. Having one's consciousness reside in a biological body is seen as inconvenient, and an unnecessary risk and expense. Who wants to risk death without ...


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An arms race between ads and ad-blockers. Don't call them mind control. They're ads. Perhaps memetically enhanced, subliminal advertising, but still advertising. And if you can't see the difference between that and mind control, some expensive lawyers and PR flacks are going to write a nice cease-and-desist letter. Citing all the precedents from 2025 onwards ...


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In 2050 year, citizens have cybernetics implants, while non citizen with reduced rights - don't. And every citizen can go to hardware store and buy non-citizens control device, that uses psy-waves emitter build from handwavium. It can control non citizens using this proprientary psy-ware: "Puppet subroutine" - AI, that performs direct control of ...


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Addiction Larry Niven suggested a similar technology in his Ringworld books. The technology was called a "Droud" and the concept has become known as the wirehead: Wirehead is a term first used in works of science fiction to refer to various kinds of interaction between human beings and technology, or to a person who makes use of such technology. ...


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There's actually a few ways to make use of this. Let's assume that mind control is a potential byproduct rather than the main use. Also there would likely be some kind of limiter build into the people themselves that guards against certain unconsentory actions like murder or wetting yourself in public that is implanted into everyone to remedy the more ...


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Mind control of others for the "average" joe I can see two reasons how it would work. mind control of lesser animals Mind control of animals is a favourite way to pass the time or to do work. You can control apes for their strength or flexibility while able to hold items. Dogs for their noses. Horses for racing each other or any of the sports, ...


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Lots of ways this could happen: Total reverse of equality regarding some group of humans, eg the return of slavery. Could be by race, by gender, or wealth. Poor people are literally owned by the rich who remote control them? (Eg "factory drones") We've created perfect AI-companions that are indistinguishable from humans down to the cellular ...


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If you think of 1D time as reversing backwards down a road so as you can only see what you have passed, this means you can travel in both directions but you can only know that you are facing (Example of 1D time). (Given a complete timeline, you could reference any point and from there only know what had happened in the relative past from that point) In a 2D ...


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There are still are time travel exploits available. Communication and travel must be at the same speed otherwise there are "future knowledge" exploits one can do from travelling faster than news of an event. The first one that comes to mind: Travel to Planet A. Attend a sporting event live. Watch the match and thoroughly enjoy it. Note the winner. ...


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One of the less discussed laws of nature is that if something is possible, it's already happened. If it were possible for your FTL "black box" to put you into your own past, it could never be invented. That means the black box must have some internal restriction that keeps it from opening a wormhole that could be used to send any mass or ...


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What would stop the intercepting aircraft from getting a missile lock on the aircraft They never got the chance to get a missile lock because they didn't have time. The bombers came through the time warp not over the English Channel, but over a large patch of undeveloped farm land only a few miles south of London. There was no time to get any fighters in ...


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For actual targeting problems, EMP in the time travel event is probably the best bet. And as other replies mentioned, the ammunition limitations meaning they're not likely to get all the bombers. But, if they have the presence of mind to believe it is the Luftwaffe out of time soon enough to react, the British Government would be on the phone to the German ...


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As all of the other answers have said, you don't really have a good scenario where the Nazis can't be shot down essentially instantly. Give the Brits a bit of knowledge about what's happening, though. Turns out they know that time travel changes the composition of those bombers and their contents, and having the bombers themselves explode with a full load ...


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2 days earlier a representative of the agency which keeps watch for strangely disappeared military units (this isn't the first time) briefed the QRA pilots. Their radio team has its dipole up and a short wave operator - and a rather quicker encryption system than the original on hand - ready to issue suitable orders. How did we know they were likely to ...


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The scenario of German bombers able to get to London is nearly as unlikely to a German Cessna getting to Moscow during the Cold War - which actually happened in 1987. The key is not that the RAF is unable to shot down WWII era bombers, the key is that nobody in the UK is going to see that group of planes slowly moving across the Channel as a threat. The ...


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TL;DR: I think the Luftwaffe crew will likely abort and attempt to get new orders, but if they don't it's going to go very badly for them. First off, the German crews: Movies like Doctor Strangelove or How I Learned To Stop Worrying And Love The Bomb aside, most soldiers and fighter pilots are not in fact gung-ho slaughter-happy warmongers, and will in fact ...


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The German bomber crews were "unaware" that they travelled through some sort of anomaly to make the time jump. That implies the anomaly was not visible or otherwise easy to detect, else the pilots would have attempted to avoid it (or at a minimum would have been aware that they just flew through something strange). Why can't your modern aircraft ...


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The time travel isn't just a "one and done" phenomena. Something keeps kicking the bombers and fighters back and forth between the two times. The German pilots are just as confused as anyone, maybe more, when their view keeps changing every few minutes. Just as the modern fighters catch up to the Germans, the whole Flight disappears. The fighters ...


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Mon has answered with how the Germans would react, but no matter if the Germans press on or turn back they'll run into territory that isn't owned by Germany. Regardless of what the Germans decide to do, someone is going to react. How would they react? First the radar will pick them up. Many of these fighters will look more like civilian planes than military ...


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They can. Steel and aluminium construction shows up quite well on modern radar and thousand horsepower V-12 or radial engines produce plenty of heat for heat seeking missiles to lock onto. Plus, fighter jets capable of Mach 2 can easily match speed with the 200+ mph cruising speed of a WW2 bomber. This is demonstrated every Battle of Britain Day and similar ...


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Interpreting the question as posed to be a request for a plausible reason, not a full tactical analysis. A modern fighter could conceivably have problems shooting down a WW-2 bomber because (a) its air-to-air missiles have infrared (IR) homing but the German planes don't have high-temperature jet exhaust and (b) there is too much of a disparity in their ...


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Count the Bombers. Count the AAMs. Count the shells. The RAF has two fighters each on QRA duty, with eight missiles and presumably 150 rounds for their guns. Say they waste their shells on warning shots and the absolute best case would be shooting down 32 enemy aircraft. More likely they will expend more than one missile per target. A German bomber Gruppe ...


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Response Time The Germans are literally coming out of nowhere. JU-88 bombers could reach speeds in excess of 500 kph. While this is not that impressive by modern standards, the English channel is only ~34 km wide, and London is only ~65 km past that. So, if they suddenly appeared over the channel they would reach London in 7.8-11.9 minutes after appearing. ...


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There is a powerful electromagnetic pulse effect emanating from the recent temporal event. This has knocked out more sensitive electronics, outside of the emp shielding of the Typhoon. Hardened radios survived, hence the recent call, but the more sensitive equipment on the typhoon, missile included, was wiped out. This also explains why they don't just call ...


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Apart from being easy to shoot down (for reasons already mentioned)? There are a number of other complicating factors which might lead the squadron leader to abort the mission. Firstly? They will have lost contact with all the other German aircraft flying the mission that night. Germany would not send one squadron of bombers & one squadron only on a ...


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They could, but they won't: Sorry to say, I don't think that anything short of time travel handwavium will get your planes invisible to modern air defense systems. BUT, if you're willing to overlook that, there is a perfectly plausible reason why (pre 9/11) jet fighters wouldn't shoot down those planes. They don't believe they are a real threat. If you were ...


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The Eurofighters can shoot down the bombers A WWII bomber is not that different to a propeller-driven transport aircraft of today in terms of signature. Modern fighters can shoot down C130 Hercules, Pilatus Porter and similar modern or slightly outdated transports, so WWII Luftwaffe aircraft would be sitting ducks. If modern fighter aircraft and their ...


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I see the point of nominating organizations like FSF and EFF, but let's face it, those are 501(c)(3)s, with boards of directors and their own formal agendas, and they can't be counted on to decide that dealing with your info-bomb is suddenly their mission in lieu of whatever they were doing before. Instead, I would send the package to one specific person, ...


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CDs are cheap (like a few cents each if you buy thousands), hold at least 600Mb and were widely used in the early 90s for distributing software. So spend $500 and buy like 2000 CDs. https://www.mediasupply.com/buvecds.html The internet existed in the 1990s. Make a peer to peer file sharing program on a CD (like LimeWire, KaZaa, BitTorrent, etc). Included ...


2

The Leibowitz Solution What about entrusting copies to e.g. the Vatican? Meets the criteria of having enough power to withstand pressure from foreign governments. Struggles on the technology side with replicating the information across the nascent internet. But as long as they can duplicate it locally they'd have enough envoys to a wide range of countries, ...


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RMS I know someone answered "GNU" already, but if you have to pick one particular person, there is probably nobody else on the planet as radical about the openness and freedom of information as Richard M. Stallman. He is an undisputed zealot on this topic. ESR Another major openness advocate is Eric S. Raymond, head of the Open Source Initiative. ...


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The People Who Came Up With It: This will be the harder option for distribution, but the fairest and in the long term ,the most effective. For scientific papers, find out the addresses of the authors. For patents, the folks who patented it. For blueprints, the companies that generated them. These will be the organizations that are already working on these ...


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