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Consider the possibility of a cat possessing the wings of a modern multi-role combat jet aircraft, such as the F/A-18 Hornet (shown here) in use by many nations. A feline with the wings of a fighter aircraft has the distinct benefit of allowing for a wide range of armaments to be carried and used against its prey and any predators that might threaten it. For ...


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Songbirds and squirrels are prime targets, usually nothing bigger. When it comes to those animals, the three kinds of flyng predators that come to mind are: Owls Falcons Hawks Owl wings would do for stealth, which goes well with cats. Falcon wings would do for speed and agility. Hawk wings would also be fast and agile, but not as much as falcon wings, and ...


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From what I can see, there's a lot to unpack on what you're asking for. "best" is subjective depending on the climate and environment. Heat and dry weather would require a certain wing type over jungle wing-types. A mammal with wings isn't common. Glider species, bats and flying squirrels are something to draw from for a more realistic approach. ...


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If you're going with magic/handwavium, take inspiration from birds that prey on songbirds/squirrels. If it's going to be hunting in the woods, consider wings like an Accipiter hawk, for open areas a Buteo hawk, if it's a stealth hunter maybe owl-like wings. If you want plausible biology, you'll be in a bit more of a pickle, not least because you need to add ...


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Eastern North America is heavily forested with high-density forests. Eastern Grey Kangaroos live in grasslands and low-density forests. The main advantage of being a kangaroo - the ability to jump - would be completely negated. They couldn't possibly compete with deer and would soon die off completely.


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Turkeys may also work: They are able to fly however tend not to as they feed on the ground They sleep in trees at night They breed and lay eggs annually There are both domestic and wild versions https://www.livescience.com/32229-can-turkeys-fly.html https://www.nwtf.org/hunt/wild-turkey-basics/lifestyle-breeding https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Turkey_(bird)


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Pheasants meet most of your criteria. lay eggs semi-regularly(females only) Every year! able to fly, but not sustained flight(eventually ends, and gaining altitude is hard, if not impossible) I think this is true of every bird, but their flight definitely ends. More to what I think you're saying, pheasants generally fly low from cover to cover, never ...


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Hot days and hot nights implies to me that much of the planet is in a humid environment with a strong greenhouse effect. Normally, dry air and soil heated by the sun during the day will lose most of that heat back out to space during night, but this loss can be slowed by a stronger greenhouse effect or higher local humidity (water vapor is great at holding ...


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Tigers and leopards would coexist fine, they already do so throughout much of Asia. Jaguars would be more difficult, jaguars basically overlap in niche with tigers and leopards in some way and the two would likely compete with each other. You might be able to get lions, jaguars, and leopards coexisting (mountain lions, jaguars, and lions coexisted in ice age ...


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This would work fine. Your tigers are wide ranging and go everywhere. There are not that many. They are large prey specialists, killing animals too big for the smaller cats. When tigers are young they climb trees but older tigers are really big and so climb only with difficulty. Like lions (or any predator!) tigers will steal prey from smaller cats or ...


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