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3 votes

What fauna can survive a permanently dark sky?

Some thoughts: If there's an average of 5% of the available solar power, there's a lot less growth and death of plants. Maybe 5% as much, but assuming a linear relationship seems like a risky ...
g s's user avatar
  • 5,439
9 votes

What fauna can survive a permanently dark sky?

As long as there something to feed on, some fauna can survive. Look at the black smokers at the bottom of the ocean: the flora thriving on the chemicals emitted by the smokers sustain a good amount of ...
L.Dutch's user avatar
  • 287k
1 vote

Feasibility of cold-blooded Livestock

The first thing you've got to ask is... are your cold-blooded animals any good at eating plants? Because efficiently turning plant material into animal material is how a farmer gets the most bang for ...
DrBob's user avatar
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1 vote

Life on a planet with never-ending rain

Some additional thoughs re. Agriculture Food production and thus diet would be very much different from what we know on Earth. From my dabbling in vegetable gardening, I know many water-logged crops ...
frIT's user avatar
  • 1,384
0 votes

Life on a planet with never-ending rain

Preconditions Rain exists as part of a cycle that involves heat transfer. Without evaporation (energy moving into water), and condensation (energy moving out of water), you can't have rain. On Earth, ...
tenhittender's user avatar
17 votes

Life on a planet with never-ending rain

assuming conditions similar to Earth? I think you have to assume that it won't be globally that similar to Earth. The problem you have is that planets are big, and the climate is very variable across ...
Starfish Prime's user avatar
5 votes

Life on a planet with never-ending rain

It washes out the ground over time, similar to australia which is so old it has seen alot of rain. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Australian_Plate So very little nutrients and those usually captured in ...
Pica's user avatar
  • 4,268
20 votes

Life on a planet with never-ending rain

What would life be like on a planet where it rains constantly, assuming conditions similar to Earth? The Netherlands and the UK manage it pretty well, they just complain a lot about the weather. ...
L.Dutch's user avatar
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0 votes

How would an extremely long winter affect an area?

How cold is this winter? Are we talking somewhere around 0°C? -10°C? -30°C? Knowing the specific temperatures would be useful here. I assume it's below freezing considering you mentioned that ice and ...
MolotovJack's user avatar
0 votes

How would an extremely long winter affect an area?

Magic-eaters are the new autotrophs I am assuming that the eternal winter you're thinking of is more like winter in the arctic than winter in the tropics. With no spring, the last natural plant died a ...
BlockStop's user avatar
  • 121
0 votes

Does prey necessarily have to be bigger than predator when it comes to larger animals?

The important factor isn't the relative size of the individual predator and prey animals, but the relative population size of the two groups. The prey population needs to be much greater than the ...
Christopher Bennett's user avatar
0 votes

Does prey necessarily have to be bigger than predator when it comes to larger animals?

Big predator - smaller prey is advantageous in cold climates, especially when food is scarce. A predator needs to conserve calories and heat between hunts, so it grows big and fat, and eats whatever ...
Going Durden's user avatar
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1 vote

How would an extremely long winter affect an area?

It would be quiet the achievement, but in theory, a small wandering tribe could prepare a "road" of resources in the summer/good years for the winter years. The tribe would then circle back, ...
Pica's user avatar
  • 4,268
2 votes

How would an extremely long winter affect an area?

This depends wildly on the level of technology. If we assume a 21st level of technology, the transition would be hard and probably involve reliance on neighbours or famine, but the situation may ...
gerrit's user avatar
  • 3,449
3 votes

How would an extremely long winter affect an area?

Polar Desert. See link: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Polar_desert As stated by the first poster the only life inside your kingdom aside from mosses and lichens on exposed (ice free) surfaces and in ...
Mon's user avatar
  • 17.2k
13 votes

How would an extremely long winter affect an area?

If your kingdom has been in continual ice and snow for 153 years, the only life (wild or otherwise) lives close enough to the borders to get its food and water from outside, or is huddled around a ...
Jay McEh's user avatar
  • 793
4 votes

How would an extremely long winter affect an area?

Quick answer: here's what one year might do. This was 1816 and the winter followed the explosion of Mount Tambora. After earlier ice ages, we find mammoths that have been frozen to death with their ...
Richard Kirk's user avatar
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