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The reduced gravity would help a bit to produce bigger trees but I wouldn't expect more than a 10-20% increase. What would make life very difficult would be the high level of oxygen in the atmosphere especially at the higher pressure. Wild fires would be an enormous risk as would storms so the giant redwood trees might not get a chance to grow to maximum ...


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The animals would be shaped by the presence of the forest. On the ground it would be very dim even in daylight and there would be lots of canopy for climbing in so I would expect monkey like creatures and snake like creatures to make use of that canopy. I do not think the circumstances you propose are that different to what happened on Earth historically. ...


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Before getting stuck in: Ocean life has a longer and richer evolutionary history because life came on land only after it had existed in the oceans for some considerable time. So if you want examples of aggressive and richly evolved animals, and plants for that matter, look at aquatic life. There are several card games on the market where you have a variety ...


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Despite their reputation for being dangerous locations, if you want an environment that breeds aggressive animals, you probably don't want a rainforest. The complex topology of rainforests gives them a lot of hiding spots, favoring a hide-or-ambush predator-prey game, rather than bloody brawling. In fact this is the main reason why they are so dangerous to ...


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Feared by whom? The bluebottle does not fear the lion. The elephant also doesn't much fear the lion*. *exceptions apply Here lies your most important factor. Life seeks niches where there isn't too much competition, and where there is a niche there is more life. Each form of life fears its own predators, but to a lion the fly is a minor irritant. If the ...


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It would look empty, for starters. To grow from a child to a fully grown adult and then get more children you need more food than you weigh. Eating meat is the most energy rich method but also requires a lot of energy to hunt, and if everyone is a violent meat eater you quickly run out of that meat so you need a massive amount of plant eaters to sustain a ...


3

Can I introduce you to the recognised concept of a Highly Sensitive Person who has: "an increased sensitivity of the central nervous system and a deeper cognitive processing of physical, social and emotional stimuli". The trait is characterized by "a tendency to 'pause to check' in novel situations, greater sensitivity to subtle stimuli, and the ...


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There are many possibilities. The people might well excrete a chemical signal from their skin as you describe. This might take the form of a distinctive smell, an odourless pheromone or simply be a chemical that the “mutant” humans use for one purpose that the dragons use for another. It is also possible that the people have mutant vocal cords and their ...


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Pheromones. These are chemical agents similar to hormones, but are excreted from the human body and used externally on other creatures of the same species, rather than internally. The thing is that humans have very weak pheromones, if at all, though numerous online retailers will do their best to convince you otherwise. That said, it's very easy to say ...


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There's precedent for animals which can detect medical problems by scent, for example dogs which are trained to identify the smell of malaria. There are also plenty of genetic mutations which could cause a difference in scent. For example, the ABCC11 gene can differentiate if a person has underarm sweat or the consistency of their earwax. It wouldn't be ...


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It's that I don't have enough points for a normal comment but I'll give it my best anyway. Okay so I'll establish first what kind of scorpions you might want. I think you'll want small scorpions with large stingers, with a relatively social behavior atleast to the degree of that of snakes that can all sit together in a small pit (you could probably breed ...


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We could even consider the effects of Earth's gravity on the evolution of human morphology that in turn determines how we move (bilateral symmetry, e.g. opposing hands) that in turns determines how we sort objects, that in turn determines the form of math we have created. Gravity influence our metaphysics, that is, the bias we project into reading our world....


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Crocodilians and birds, that gives you all the relevant genetic material you can possibly get. Then you just have a metric buttload of engineering and breeding to go through. you will have to go through several generations just to get something that can produce big enough eggs.


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Still birds. Therapoda, sauropodomorpha, and ornithischia all have a common ancestor (and, in fact, that common ancestor is the taxonomic definition of "dinosaur"). So, if you've got the genetic modification mojo sufficient to dial a bird back to something resembling therapoda, you can do the same for its sister classes. Probably using bird eggs, ...


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I would imagine from just pure physical similarities, you could probably use elephants, rhinoceroses or giraffes to fit your purpose. They have the size and body shape already, but would require adjustments to how quickly they grow and the addition of bone growths on their body to better resemble the dinosaurs you seek. While birds and reptiles might be ...


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From wikipedia on Roman Roads Roman construction took a directional straightness. Many long sections are ruler-straight, but it should not be thought that all of them were. Some links in the network were as long as 55 miles (89 km). Gradients of 10%–12% are known in ordinary terrain, 15%–20% in mountainous country. The Roman emphasis on constructing ...


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