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Crocodilians and birds, that gives you all the relevant genetic material you can possibly get. Then you just have a metric buttload of engineering and breeding to go through. you will have to go through several generations just to get something that can produce big enough eggs.


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Still birds. Therapoda, sauropodomorpha, and ornithischia all have a common ancestor (and, in fact, that common ancestor is the taxonomic definition of "dinosaur"). So, if you've got the genetic modification mojo sufficient to dial a bird back to something resembling therapoda, you can do the same for its sister classes. Probably using bird eggs, ...


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I would imagine from just pure physical similarities, you could probably use elephants, rhinoceroses or giraffes to fit your purpose. They have the size and body shape already, but would require adjustments to how quickly they grow and the addition of bone growths on their body to better resemble the dinosaurs you seek. While birds and reptiles might be ...


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There's no rule against it. Salinity is not a barrier for plants, as seen by sea grasses and mangroves. If it evolved once it would evolve again. Growing underwater has certain mechanical considerations because water currents are a lot harsher than air currents. Your new seaplants would probably start to resemble the current seaplants, because the ...


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There have been a lot of interesting answers with far more research than what I'm willing to dedicate, but based off of those, here's my input: Most of the answers highlight that you need some form of mobility to introduce a pressure to evolve intelligence / sentience. My first thought was to a plant that would live in different ecosystems, in phases. ...


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In nature there are already quite a few plants with motility, albeit not while rooted. Seeds are the most common example and they might as well adapt to float and roll as an energy efficient way of travel. The Mimosa pudica (shy plant) can close its leaves as a response to touch. This can become a survival mechanism, plants retract underground to avoid ...


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There used to be huge forests in the Antarctic during the Cretaceous period. According to this article, life on desert planets should actually be more likely than many other types of planets, assuming there are at least a few wet areas: https://www.astrobio.net/alien-life/alien-life-more-likely-on-dune-planets/


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