New answers tagged

0

No. But... simply because the term "ecological damage" is nonsensical. Modern sensibilities equate that term with unpopular human influence on nature. But humans are and always have been as much a part of the planet's ecology as any other living thing. When humans want to dam a river there is much anxiety about the potential for damaging the local ...


0

Hydrogen sulfide is an extremely dangerous gas: it is enough that it represents 0.002-0.005% of the volume of the air to endanger the life of those who come into contact with it. Currently, carbon dioxide represents approximately 0.04 % of the volume of the Earth's atmosphere, if hydrogen sulfide represented 1 %, it would be 25 times the volume of carbon ...


0

Perhaps, G-23 Paxilon Hydrochlorate... Seriously though, sulfur dioxide might be a good choice. It would give a really great mouth of hell vibe along with insane acid rain.


2

Some interesting inert gases Neon - to have pretty red-orange lightning Helium-3 - infinite energy if there's civilization that develops nuclear fusion. Heavy gases like fluorocarbons or sulfur hexafluoride - while inert, can settle in terrain depressions and cause choking hazard, making exploration interesting. Can be "mined" for use as refrigeration ...


0

Helium atoms are so small (even smaller than hydrogen thanks to their structure) that they permeate any material. There is real-world example it got into iPhone clock crystals and caused malfunction. Vacuum tubes and CRT displays, or even fluorescent lighting, will probably be impractical, they will require constantly pumping the helium out. Helium can cause ...


4

10x10 miles area is very small! You hardly have 2-3 large herbivores and 1-2 large predators species even for morden animals (like boars, elks, deers, wolfs, some big cats). As for hyper large dinosaurs - it more likely to have single species for both (or have herbivores only, like mamonths on Wrangel Island (~8 000 square kilometers - more than ten times ...


0

You need a glacier and abscence of rains. Best way to achive this - strategicaly placed high mountains on one side of an island - they would keep glacier and cast "wind shadow" with no-rain zone on (almoust) all the island. Mamonth steppes should be on sort of mesa in our warmer climate, so some traps would help. Mamonth steppes formed between deserts and ...


0

By evolution. It may possible when there are only few predators and competitors for the primary food source of mammoth and also no drastic environmental changes. Maybe there was an earlier source of climate change that makes the environmental change smother but stretched duration. Mammoth may be altered because of fitting process. So maybe you could run an ...


2

Probably not going to work out how you want. I believe you are creating a version of Saturn's moon Titan. Titan has a greenhouse effect going on (and a smaller "anti-greenhouse" effect), which raises the atmospheric temperature. It's about 10 AU from the Sun, so receives about 1% of the power per unit area. The problem is that although the greenhouse ...


3

My first idea was to proceed in a step-wise calculation: first determine the temperature of the planet given its distance from the star, and then add the effect of the atmosphere. This seems to be also the approach given here, from where I will quote the most relevant parts. The first key idea is that hot objects lose heat faster than cold objects. This ...


5

Allright I'm basing it off of this: https://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/UsefulNotes/Airships Unlike what others have said, airships are actually exceptionally durable, rule of thumb for storms it can handle is an average speed the same as the maximum speed of the ship and the airship is one of the only vehicles that benefits from the square cube law. The ...


1

Airships need ballast and lifting gas to maintain their altitude. Water is reasonably cheap, just heavy. Hydrogen is flammable, so the other option is helium which is expensive. This will be much more of a concern than food and drinking water. Airships don't do well in storms. Good airship captains solve that by never flying into storms if they can help it, ...


2

Main Issues The principal issue I find is, first and foremost, you'll never have a blimp big enough. For every person or thing or load of groceries or increased battery / solar panel capacity, you need ever more lift gas which means you need ever larger ship size. The longer you want to remain aloft, the more fuel, the more groceries, the more fresh water ...


0

In the middle of your society. ** https://www.petaluma360.com/news/9749709-181/29-surge-in-number-of?sba=AAS&artslide=1 The fact that you are homeless does not mean you are a rugged individualist, just as the fact that you are a cowboy does not mean you are a rugged individualist. But you can have someone living in the middle of a society and detached ...


4

As already discussed in other answers, pure, self-reliant individualism just won't work since whatever you do alone in the wild, you´ll use products others produced. The axe or clothes being great examples. But if we decide to go full-on sci-fi, here a possibility for a self-reliant and extremely individualistic lifestyle comes up, at least if you are ...


3

If I understand your question, I think the answer is: During and immediately after a breakdown of civilization The primary weakness of cooperative/collectivist approach is that eventually you wind up with most of your population being specialized for specific activities. If you've got a hundred people, or a thousand, or a hundred thousand and you want ALL ...


-3

Put them where you like. In every environment, collectivism is inferior to individualism. This has happened every single time collectivism has been tried, and every single time individualism has been tried. For example, the first Plymouth colony nearly died out the first winter because they had instituted a collectivist model. The colony took all the ...


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The place of an individualist, self-reliant guy in fluxes In western literature, this niche is usually filled with explorers and loners. In recent media, "The ballad of Buster Scruggs" puts forward several good examples, the best one for me the prospector in "All gold canyon", as we can see him basically living-off the land for long periods of time. At a ...


1

The way you describe them, your individuals remind me of hikikomori, at least from the point of view of withdrawal from society. In Japan, hikikomori (Japanese: ひきこもり or 引きこもり, lit. "pulling inward, being confined", i.e., "acute social withdrawal"; colloquially/adaptive translation: shut-in) are reclusive adolescents or adults who withdraw from society ...


-1

People often replicate their surroundings. This is suggested by the 'nature vs nurture' idea, as well as in both real-life and in stories. As you yourself pointed out, the Wild West was actually collectivist-leaning, not filled with macho gunmen living by their own rules, which indicates that there's no strength to being solitary in an environment built to ...


2

Read up on r/K selection theory. Explosive breeding characteristics are an adaptation to predation, not a precursor to it. Species in environments without predators tend to adapt towards smaller numbers of offspring and longer periods of parental care-taking. Explosive breeding in such environments is non-selective because it strips the environment of ...


3

Given the creatures are clearly intelligent they use one of the solutions humans used. Limited births, several countries have legal limits on the number of offspring to limit population growth. War, famine, and disease, this has been the most popular if unintentional limiting factor on humans population growth. Famine and disease are obvious outcomes of ...


0

Yes Taiga can, and almost always do, border tundra. Between 60 and 75 degrees north/south, taiga gives way to tundra, especially if there's a cold surface current flowing by the coast. Look at Canada, for example, where the turquoise subarctic continental climate, aka taiga, borders grey tundra. Cold steppes bordering taiga is, as far as I know, without ...


4

Depending on your swamp there are two key pieces of information: Routes where the water is always shallow enough and the ground firm enough to walk Routes where the water is always deep enough to use a small boat A swamp is a maze without definite pathways. The conditions of the above routes could repeatedly cross each other without interfering, but ...


3

If your swamp is a very hostile environment where the Swamp Rats have culturally adapted to as a matter of survival then beyond detailed knowledge of the terrain, they'll have skills that make them dangerous foes. (1) Since they hunt in the swamp, they learned how to move without disturbing nesting birds. This lets them take their prey without warning. A ...


9

It seems to me the tactical advantage they'd have would be first and foremost knowledge of the terrain. If they've been mucking about there as nomads for a while, they'll have learned where the (and I'm guessing at wildlife, so please allow for these being examples) 'gators hang out, where the birds nest, how to watch for water moccasins, and what to put on ...


-2

There would be varieties of plant life in the dusk zone that would adapt to gather as much light as possible, becoming darker to absorb more, potentially even black. The plant color could possibly then lighten as you move to the terminator and back over to the light side.


1

Signal emitters/scramblers Your world could contain a vast space of chaos-lands, much like several RPG videogames where any attempt to go "outside town"—outside an "island of safety", rather—results in attacks from random monsters. Or it could contain a vast space of safe-lands with "islands of chaos." Either one works with this explanation. The order ...


3

If your world is a giant computer that accepts user input, then it is by definition vulnerable to computer viruses that can be created by your magic rituals. In modern computing, you can't defend against every possible virus; so, you set up an antivirus program with authority over all other programs that follows heuristic rules to identify suspected viruses ...


2

Copy from the real world. https://pubs.usgs.gov/pp/1768/pp1768.pdf A new map of standardized, mesoscale (tens to thousands of hectares) terrestrial ecosystems for the conterminous United States was developed by using a biophysical stratification approach. The ecosystems delineated in this top-down, deduc- tive modeling effort are described in ...


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There are several ways to achieve this, but it depends on how large, what barriers you have between your biomes and what arrangement they are If your Biomes are encapsulated environments (for instance, in domes): Connect using an airlock is the most simplest way. It keeps the environments separate, allows minimal cross-contamination of species and seeds, ...


5

The key word in "Dark Forest" is "Dark". Each nanite is self regulating with a fundamental AI and strong community/pack instincts. Normally, it receives its instructions from the AI via a radio circuit which is powered by a small solar battery. Any nanite which is exposed to sunlight charges up the battery and contacts the AI for instructions. When a ...


2

Semi-Autonomous overrides of behaviour when communication has been severed. My simplest explanation would be how the nanites perform when they don't have communication with their central orchestration entity, possibly due to signal interference or naturally occurring EM emission. If these nanites work by being constantly in communication with the host ...


5

Nanites should have sort of immune system: they are destroing xenonanites. The destruction is mutal. It means that diffirent "races" of nanites would form clusters with constant everlasting immune "battle" at the border (wich generates very toxic grey powder wich clearly desegnates the border of "evil lands"). The size and a form of this cluster depends on ...


3

The World is covered in a grid (like latitude longitude not a physical grid) of AI controlling the nanites that makes them able to manifest themselves as gods during said rituals. Some part of the world those datacenters or computers where the IA brain is located or where they are controlled from are damaged (during ancient times or due to temporal decay ...


1

Taiga cannot border steppe (at least wide forest have to be in between, or, like in Siberia - some low forested mountain range), but tundra can (It is actualy a "cold steppe" - it would be smooth translation from cold steppe to temperate one).


4

Let's turn our thinking around. Instead of asking, "how could alien attacks send humanity into a diaspora?" we can ask, "what would aliens do if they wanted to scatter humanity like this?" Say, for instance, the aliens don't want to permanently ruin the worlds that the humans have colonized (because those worlds could be used by the aliens down the line), ...


2

So, to take a stab at this, destabilization of the oort cloud, millions upon billions of icy debris, with a vast number of objects over the size of 1km. A dead star swinging by the very edge of our system could easily dislodge of a few billion kilometer long pieces of ice. Just for good measure there could be ancient dormant prions, as mentioned in a ...


3

A good choice is a Mediterranean climate. A Mediterranean climate or dry summer climate is characterized by dry summers and mild, wet winters. The climate receives its name from the Mediterranean Basin, where this climate type is most common. Mediterranean climate zones are typically located along the western sides of continents, between roughly ...


5

The Canary Islands, the Insulae Fortunatae (Happy / Lucky Islands) of the ancients, are famous for their "eternal spring" climate -- average 24°C (75°F), winter 20°C (70°F), summer 26°C (80°F). And they are real. Las Palmas (on Gran Canaria island) is a major tourist destination.


9

Not only can it be done, but you're basically describing Vancouver Island. Vancouver Island has extremely mild winters and warm (but not hot) summers. Most conveniently for the purposes of your story, you don't even have to add a new island to the Earth to make your story work. It's been often speculated (although not proven) that explorers from Korea and ...


13

The ocean itself tends to moderate climate -- Vancouver, BC, gets much less severe winters than Toronto, despite being somewhat further from the equator. Further, the temperature of the water has a strong effect -- Sheffield (England) would have a climate like Yellowknife if not for the tail end of the Gulf Stream warming the winters. So, that's what you ...


1

Framing Challenge You're getting a lot of pushback over the specification on radiation levels, but realistically (and most in what I think is the real spirit of your question), it's not actually radiation that's going to kill all the humans, it's starvation. From a 2007 study on widespread global nuclear war: "A global average surface cooling of −7 °C ...


11

The capability to survive the event depends, in part, on the species capacity to heal its own genetic and cellular structure. Higher-order mammals that evolve quickly have the least ability to repair this kind of damage, since its why we evolve so quickly compared to creatures like crocodiles and cockroaches. Mammals have changed immensely while other ...


1

In order to increase the amount of relevant details an organism pulls from its sensory data you would need an organism to live in an environment that requires it to know about more details about its environment to survive. To maximize the details the organism needs you need it to be a predator but not an apex predator. This requires it to use its senses to ...


1

Automated sensory selectivity, i.e. not passing sensory data to the conscious mind, is the result of evolution. Certain sensory inputs have been deemed irrelevant and thus placed in a sort of second tier data, which is passed to the conscious mind only if you focus on it. Other answers have provided the obvious explanation that this effect is due to an ...


3

I think you're missing a few details of how brains work, so I'll jump in with a neural network: You say... I kind of just made this term up, so let me explain it briefly here. All information is preserved and the brain does not "zone out" any "noise." It feels everything from every sensory receptor in its whole body all the time. Here's an interesting ...


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