181

If the antimatter containment is failing then power would be failing also. Escape pods wouldn't require power. They are also located all over the ship and the vast majority of the crew could reach one and escape in less than a minute. A transporter system would be located in one part of the ship and at best transfer a handful of crew at a time. If the ...


121

Get out I mean, literally. As in "get out of the universe". The heat death of our universe is by definition not a survivable event. That's the bad news. The good news is that it takes a very, very long time to happen. So a technological society has time to develop technological solutions to the problem. Some things that might work are: Cross over ...


97

Befriend and hang out with fellow passenger, Margaret (Molly/Maggie) Brown then follow her to lifeboat #6 which historically will have available seats.


93

No. By definition the heat death is the state where you could no longer do anything. Any actions you do before it only makes it come sooner. Best strategy: Sit still, do absolutely nothing. (I kinda like this strategy) For high-tech civilizations I recommend you put out the stars. They produce entropy really fast. In general, stop things from changing. ...


88

You would need roughly 62500 cubic metres of mercury. One cubic metre of mercury is 13,534 kilograms. So you would need to mine 845,875 tons of mercury. In cinnabar there is 12% percent of mercury. So you would need to mine 75000000 cubic metres of pure cinnabar. In the 13th century. In 1981 we globally produced 5500 tons of mercury. Globally. With modern ...


85

Mongrels There is no reason to think that left to themselves, dogs will remain in breeds. They will cross breed. In a few generations, there won't be any separate breeds. All dogs will be mongrels. There may be some specialist types. For example, smaller dogs may specialize in hunting in tunnels (e.g. rabbit warrens). The largest dogs will likely ...


85

No. Life on Earth and our solar system in general would not be harmed by this sudden universal destruction. Everything outside of the Solar system affects us via electromagnetic radiation, gravity, and "matter transfer". The EM radiation flux is too weak to really do much, other than marvel at through telescopes. With the rest of the universe gone we'd ...


83

Assets 1 obsolete piece of short range comms kit requiring a battery you probably can't charge 1 slightly malfunctioning escape pod with up to date comms that isn't working but you're still alive Current standards say the Mayday should be broadcast on VHF channel 16 (156.8 MHz). A 1999 phone, probably on 2g would likely use 900MHz (UHF). The slightly ...


82

Well, start with the Wikipedia page. On fertile soil, a tall coconut palm tree can yield up to 75 fruits per year, but more often yields less than 30, mainly due to poor cultural practices The same page lists the nutritional value as 354 kcalories per 100 gram serving. And finding the weight of the edible fruit part alone, the USDA says that one ...


82

As a native I'm definitely biased here, but Ireland is actually a pretty good bet. Especially towards the West, Ireland has actually seen a decline in rural population. You can genuinely walk for miles and see no signs of civilisation. I'm talking even the grass has no footprints. Predators? Ha! St Patrick took care of our snakes, and our beloved English ...


76

New Zealand. Nowhere in the southern hemisphere is a likely target for nuclear weapons, but New Zealand is further south than any other countries except Chile and Argentina, has a stable economy and government, a temperate climate, and is self-sufficient in food. It’s also far enough from anywhere else that it’s unlikely to be swamped with refugees from ...


74

Hard physics answer I think the question is fundamentally ill-posed. As long as there are humans alive somewhere, the universe is millions to the power of millions of years away from the "heat death" (which is not at all an agreed-upon or well-understood thing). The heat death (if we assume it is well-defined) is definitely not "when the last star fades ...


73

As soon as a lifeboat launches, volunteer to be in it. At first there were quite a lot of people who hesitated to go into a little wooden boat in the middle of the Atlantic, when the big reassuring liner still had power and light and was merely stopped. Here is the wikipedia link looked up by DevSolar. Pryftan is right, a source never hurts.


72

We wouldn't even notice for several years. The closest star to us (aside from the Sun) is Alpha Centauri, which is just over 4 light-years away. That means that whenever we look at Alpha Centauri from earth, we are seeing light that left the star over 4 years ago. If Alpha Centauri were extinguished today, we wouldn't even realize it until 4 years from now! ...


69

Absolutely. Simply write "S. O. S." on a piece of paper, wrap it around the phone, secure it with some tape or a rubber band, then put the phone in the air lock and open the external door. Now all you need is a deck of cards so you'll have something to do while you await rescue!


66

I'm not convinced that 18 is too old at all; in point of fact, if ALL the 'adults' left at once, society would be ruined in many different ways. What we call civilisation is really a very delicate balance in this world. Let's start with something as simple as food distribution. Without people who know how to drive trucks, most of humanity will starve ...


62

We all die. Slow painful deaths. if Magnetic fields quit working, the biggest problem is the one the Earth is producing to protect us from a bunch of solar radiation. Remember the borealis? That is a visual reminder of the protection provided. It also helps keep our atmosphere from slowly being torn away by the solar winds. Magnetic fields also are ...


61

They say a picture is worth a thousand words, so I'll add three. North Korea is the most likely country to start throwing missiles around. This is the map of the range of their ICBM's: Let me highlight a detail: Brazil is a country that is neutral on every major conflict, with important ties to all sides. Being outside the range of the first wave of ...


60

Yes they could. Very Easily. Contrary to myth, the asteroid belt is very nearly empty. (See https://physics.stackexchange.com/questions/26712/what-is-the-average-distance-between-objects-in-our-asteroid-belt for a related discussion.) Planners for the Dawn mission, which spent many years moving through the asteroid belt, visiting both Vesta and Ceres (and ...


58

Unquestionably Yes. Without a doubt Homo Sapiens is the most adaptable species on Mother Nature. Evolution Through the last 5 million years Homo Sapiens (latin: wise man) has toughed it out through (geologically) swift climate change, near extinction, and unbridled warfare. Unlike our cousins in the Homo Genus, we've adapted at every single turn or died ...


57

Fungiculture Below the buildings and streets of your beset cities, farmers cultivate fungi in tunnels, basements, catacombs, and mines. Organic scraps and other biological waste is sent here to feed the 'shrooms. Hunter-gatherer Small teams of hunters and gatherers risk life and limb beyond the walls, spending a few hours each day hunting game and ...


52

Frankly, I would not bother with cars or trucks. Use a train! Any large diesel engine, or several combined, with a snow plow up front. As a bonus, you can add waggons for any goods you may want to carry (such as extreme amounts of ammunition and fuel for your flamethrowers), and most of all you can navigate without a problem: you know in advance where ...


52

Actual brazillian here. The reason why you won't find any mountable animals in the amazon rain forest is because it's kinda like a more green, lush version of Australia, in the aspect that half of the biomass is out to kill you in horrible ways. It is a [redacted] to go through the jungle, on foot or otherwise. And the river waters can be classified in ...


52

Gravity isn't going to let that happen I'm not the resident orbital mechanics specialist so I don't have specific figures in front of me but as I understand it, there's no way that two planets, both of Earth mass, are going to collide slowly. The reason for that is that they're going to be attracted to each other by gravity. Even if they could collide ...


49

If you're talking about ALL magnetism, the answer is pretty boring - everyone and everything immediately and literally falls apart. Electrons are bound to the nuclei of atoms through the electromagnetic force, so without magnetism electrons would fly off. Sharing of electrons is what binds different atoms together into molecules. Protons would not push ...


48

Transporters have a short range. (If they had a long range, you wouldn't need the ship). Enemy ships like to attack when nothing else is nearby, and mechanical failures and natural disasters happen whenever they happen, which is likely to be in the middle of nowhere. Crew can abandon ship into escape pods and wait for rescue - even if the rescuers are the ...


47

No. Just no. Not at all possible. Even with video. (One caveat only applies.) Even with futuristic technology. You're still dealing with the totally unfuturistic human body. And that's something the other autosurgery answers fail to deal with. Human arms and hands aren't designed to work behind our backs all that well. Especially when away from direct ...


46

In a world like this, I think that the employer would sort out most of the security: 'Normal' Humans would be in demand: consider that, once a month, all of society breaks down for an entire night as everyone goes completely insane, then suffers amnesia about it in the morning. There are some people who only go a little insane, but they're ...


46

In Iraq a few summers ago we had a wild dog problem. They would chew through the water lines that ran from the collection tank through our camp. This was just an annoyance, initially, and we just resolved ourselves to putting up with it for the duration of the mission. Then a rabies epidemic broke out. Three dozen or so wild dogs with rabies is kind of a ...


46

Buy a first class ticket If you had a child with you would increase it more. You could also have your life jacket with you and wait near the lifeboats. Being a woman would also increase the odds. Even if you were a first-class passenger with a higher likelihood of getting a seat in a lifeboat, your chances of getting that seat increased if you were a ...


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