New answers tagged

2

You have answered your own question already. When the fight is because of principle, a pragmatic approach can be very effective. Look at Europe: because of principle (religion, nationalism, etc.) the major powers have fought each other for centuries. After the last two bloody wars where their populations have been decimated, they have realized that being ...


3

The world would remain (mostly) unchanged thanks to Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs. People who could photosynthesise (and therefore not require food would have a dramatic impact on the global industry to be sure, but the one thing that would NOT happen is that people stop working. Many industries, like farming, would not exist but people would find other ...


3

While I totally agree, that humans are not capable of photosynthesis in any way possible, but this is not a science-based question, so let's handwave it. Firstly, famine is only one of four. There are many other deadly dangers and demands connected to them: Temperature - people need homes and clothes Dangerous animals - homes, fences, guards, doctors ...


5

Your assumption that sunlight alone is sufficient for survival is incorrect. It creates energy similar to the human digestive system, but does not create nutrients. The materials a plant or tree needs to grow and build additional branches or leaves can't simply be created from just sunlight. To actually grow, a plant or tree absorbs water and nutrients from ...


0

If your setting allows it, send them offworld Governments, seeking to get rid of massive amounts of unemployed, would build large, low cost spaceships to colonize whatever, it doesn't matter to them, as long as they remain away from their territory


0

10% unemployment? So Italy? Spain? Greece? You need to remeber that in modern world those people (or most of them) are financially supported by state. In Egypt it was slaves. In medevial europe there was no such thing as unemployed. What you think were no-skill peasant who worked their tithe to the church by working on cathedrals and such and were PAID in ...


0

Frame challenge: Your System Cannot Reach Critical Mass Because of Brain Drain Creating a parallel economy, which appears to be what you are suggesting, requires creative, resourceful, self-starting people. Most of them already have jobs. Those who don't, who theoretically are building your parallel economy, may be recruited into the regular economy. ...


0

See stack exchange None of us are paid, but all of us work in some capacity for the site. Our goals are decentralized and proposed by other users. Sometimes we build large and elaborate items to solve personal problems of the community or of individuals. Have a voting system, and a way to track contributions, people are not paid, but more work means more ...


1

The Griffin can store water in its feathers, it flies to a nearby lake, immerses itself, then carefully flies back. The Sandgrouse is a type of pigeon that purposefully carries water in its feathers for its Chicks. The Chicks then 'milk' the carrier (either male or female) by sucking water from its feathers. ^Image of a Sandgrouse gathering water The same ...


0

All you get is light and a large enough peace of soil + water & some seeds. If you dont grow food for air and food you will starve and die. If you eat your seeds - you will die. Its basically a miniature world to be robinson crusoe in..


2

The standard method was "Who is the biggest guy in the neighbourhood who is going to force us to use their calendar?" or "Who is the biggest guy in the neighbourhood whose calendar we have to use in order to get any trading done with them?" Which is pretty much the same thing. Thus the initial use of the Egyptian and Sumerian calendars, with the Sumerian ...


2

At first, people didn't follow the same calendars at all. Many cultures had different calendars, although it was trivial for many of them to discover that 365 and 1/4 days was a good approximation of the number of days in a year. But most cultures had no unified conception of specific dates, with the one exception being that many cultures had some kind of ...


2

The griffin has enough limbs to be able to carry a bucket to the nearest river or lake, fill it and fly back. If it's a big griffin maybe it can carry enough in one trip to provide a day or more water for the lord. The problem would be getting the water into the cell... You can have a hole in the door (or bars) big enough to get a meal through without too ...


6

Ask tribute to the locals The lord not only controlled the castle, but also the whole region around it, and all the yokel that live there. The griffin does not only control the castle, but also (even if it's less than the lord), the region. He can probably ask to one of this folk to gather some water and deliver it to the lord. Same can be done for food, ...


2

You do realize that he's probably going to need water for more than just drinking, yes? If the griffin wants to keep him alive, that means taking into account basic hygiene, and that needs water.


2

If his food contains enough water, he doesn't actually need to drink. Maybe the griffin brings him mostly fruits and vegetables.


48

In medieval times, this was given quite a lot of thought as castles were designed in most cases to survive a siege. Food is an issue during a siege to be sure, but water more so; this ties into the law of 3s; you can survive 3 minutes without oxygen, 3 days without water and 3 weeks without food. These are of course approximations, but you get the general ...


12

A number of options. The castle has a well within its walls so the lord can toss a bucket down and get water for himself. A more modern castle might have hand pumps in appropriate places so maybe no need for a bucket. Assuming the castle isn't in a very dry region, rain could be collected from the roof and fed directly to cisterns, from which the lord can ...


3

They will not smell. Any carbon or nitrogen containing compounds (oils, fatty acids, desquamated skin) will either volatilize and escape as vapor, or be oxidized to CO2 and H2O. What will remain is salts. Sodium and potassium chloride are the main ones and those will not volatilize at these temperatures and will remain on the skin. Those salts are ...


7

Heating their body would only burn/dry/oxidize anything on their skin, not take it away. They would probably do better taking baths in sand, which could remove dirt, dead skin, and oils without needing water. This is called dust bathing and is practiced quite a bit in nature. If there were anything that dust bathing couldn't remove, like something sticky we'...


3

Your creatures will smell like burnt stuff. Merely trying to remove stuff from your skin mechanically will not do, there will always be some leftover. It is also not practical to remove sweat. Speaking of which, sweat isn't just pure water (otherwise it wouldn't smell!). It's water plus bodily wastes and some more things. The wiki lists: Lactic acid Urea ...


4

Major Pyramids and Ziggurats Not just the Giza Pyramids, mentioned by Patricia Shanahan, but also the biggest of the Mesoamerican pyramids, like the Great Pyramid of Cholula, the biggest known pyramid in the world, The La Danta end El Tigre pyramids in El Mirador, and the Pyramid of the Sun in Tetihuacan, all of which are already around 2,000 years old. ...


2

The Hoover Dam would remain mostly intact, though it'll only be running for a year or two after maintenance stops and zebra mussles clog the coolant intakes


6

I nominate the Giza Pyramids. They have already survived about 4,500 years without maintenance, and indeed with human destruction in the form of removing outer casing stones.


1

You need to read this "What If?" post on XKCD which speculates on the possibility of a mole of moles. Your Earth sized humanoid is larger than a mole of moles but the principle is the same, and pretty hideous. It will collapse under gravity to form a hideous sphere of rancid bubbling meat, heating until the decomposer bacteria die off and then going into a ...


0

There's a video game called Xenoblade Chronicles where people on two giants, one called Bionis with organic lifeforms and the other called Mechonis, with mechanical lifeforms. It's a really good game I'd recommend checking it out. Take into account the environment on this dead human. Is there organic life, plants, fauna? How do people breathe? How does time ...


1

Earth is roughly spherical and yet we see many different variations in living conditions. The sphere we live on enables a roughly even distrubution of attributes (e.g. water, air, gravity) which enables plant life and animal live to thrive and move around. Instead of Mt everest imagine a mountain 200 miles high, most of which would have not atmostphere. If ...


2

Yes. Even if the earth sized human was dead it would take an extremely long time for the rest of its gargantuan body to realize that. Basically as long as you had an atmosphere,a source of oxygen (algae mats in water and trees adapted to draw on the blood of the gigantic humanoid) and food;of which there is plenty assuming means of harvesting it. Then yeah,...


3

if the earth itself turned into a dead immortal human We are talking of an earthquake of magnitude screw you in the Richter scale. I don’t think human survive. The end. OK, humans are saved by magic. There is a planetary size undead human. So yay! What happened to all the plants? Without any ground to take nutrients from… if they are any around, they are ...


2

Sure, if backed up by an entire ecosystem. You'll need rain, or at least rivers or aquifers for water (blood aquifers probably won't work, too salty). So is the body surrounded by water somewhere that can evaporate and fall? You'll need plants. Human's can't go pure carnivore, you'll get scurvy and other nutritional deficiencies (if they could dig to ...


2

This is easier than the other stuff you mention ...Not that it's easy, mind you. It's still something far beyond anything we can conceivably pull off in the near future. Gene editing encodes proteins. Genes are activated based on their cell's position in the body, and exposure to chemicals produced by that area of the body. This causes them to produce ...


0

I think around the fourth? chapter of "The wandering Earth" by Cixin Liu, a really cool concept of an alien species that evolved within the center of a planet is introduced. I'd consider it required reading for this kind of story as those few chapters were very compelling.


1

Millimeter precision? Honestly, I don't think this is possible in exactly the way you've asked. Even current tattoos are subject to distortion as skin changes (which can happen due to changes in body composition, aging, etc.). Asking for something that will somehow manifest with such precision through the fairly radical changes that happen from conception to ...


0

You're already far out of the boundaries of nature. You're asking for the equivalent of a reasonable laser gun for your time travelers. I don't have a mechanism to suggest, but would like to point out that what you're already doing is strictly harder than what you want to do. If you hand-waved the spider legs, there's no point in finding a reasonable ...


5

You have a lot of options. I'll list a few from most to least feasible (and also least to most expensive). Seed the skin with melanocytes: Graft or inject stem cells into the skin designed to become melanocytes, the pigment-producing cells responsible for skin color. Such a technique would produce millimeter precision, and tattoos designed this way wouldn't ...


7

Surprisingly, yes. Have you ever seen a Siamese cat? One of the unique features about them is the fact that they've got black fur clustering around their face. And the way this works is pretty neat too - the genetics by the black fur aren't any different from the white fur around the rest of the body. Rather the physical expression, that is the phenotype, ...


0

user2352714 has provided a very good answer, but there are some suggestions based on admittedly incomplete evidence that Neanderthals and other related species like the Desisovians would not have produced a civilization like ours even has they survived in large numbers after the ice age. The existing evidence would seem to suggest that Neanderthals were "...


1

First of all - if you call the culture, you're "studying", behaviour - a "bizarre nonsense" you might be in the wrong field. You are not only biased toward them but also prejuiced and with very narrow defintions. You interpret the thing as "dance" because it's what in your culture is called (not even on your planet). But it's a language. A language shared ...


3

There was a project of a ship made from ice&papper. This is quite workable solution. You may want to use hay, wool or some synthetic threads instead of papper for even better results. So yes ice provide more than enough bouyancy to keep small house afloat. Solid ice block would have only 1/10 above the water, but you don't need to make it solid. Metal ...


4

Not as described... Icebergs are frozen fresh water. And presuming that the ocean is roughly as dense as it is now, an iceberg has roughly 1/10th of its total volume above water. A Spherical House will in this case be mostly underwater, with a small slither above the waterline, which sounds fine... But that's not the problem, the problem is that it is a ...


1

Yes the ice could provide sufficient buoyancy by a large margin. The potential problem would be ice drift from a polar glacier into the sea followed by a move to warmer latitudes. This could melt the habitat within a few years. Better to build it on a thick layer of ice far from the sea. If the habitat was sufficiently near to the pole then it would take a ...


5

The Dancing Plague is back and better than ever. This phenomena was first observed in 1518 in Strasbourg. Perhaps it was demons, or contaminated rye, or an entirely psychological phenomenon - but for several months, people were inexplicably compelled to burst into dance. Combined with the rise of musical theater as an art form among humans, it's no wonder ...


0

Over the life of every human they have been trained to associate singing and dancing with happiness. This species seems to be the most happy when they sing and dance, especially in groups. Many of these songs and dances are ritualistically taught starting at birth. Everyone knows the newest song and dance as it is broadcast on TV or on the internet. ...


1

Why would you write a poem, or a heartfelt letter to your loved one? A simple affirmation of love would convey the same meaning without using so many words. Why would you speak to your boss politely and ask for a raise, instead of just bluntly stating that you want it? As humans, we do value other humans putting more effort into their communication than ...


3

Castles Castles are fine defensive structures, that allow a relatively small number of defenders to hold off a much larger attacking force. The defenders need to be: sufficiently numerous that they can maintain constant watch on all approaches; armed with missile weapons and (at close range) heavy and/or heated objects that can be dropped on attackers; ...


0

That's really hard to answer. I'd say that the total average might be not much different from now. Humans tend to compensate security with more dangerous activities. So if you look at old WW2 veterans, they appreciate life much more than the younger generations. Young people often become bored from their lifes and start to do dangerous sports (driving ...


1

No, not realistic at all Humans use technology, and adapt to their environments by using that technology. Your marine based humans won't start growing fins because they'll have boats and scuba gear. Even if they don't have those things now, they will in a few tens or hundreds of generations, a time span far too short for any significant evolution. You ...


4

Yes it is entirely possible that should Neanderthals have survived, they would form an advanced society - to the same extent as our current technological society Homo Sapiens appears to be the only animal we know of to have achieved technological means. Note however, that there is nothing particular special about Homo Sapiens: we have very little difference ...


5

Yes It's already started to happen already. The Bajau population of Indonesia have lived on houseboats for the last 1000 years and have evolved genetically enlarged spleens which allows them to use oxygen more efficiently so they can stay underwater for longer. See https://www.telegraph.co.uk/science/2018/04/19/nomadic-divers-evolve-larger-spleens-stay-...


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