New answers tagged

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Why not create one, other people remind you that there are other ideas, other ways of being, they tell you what you are is a choice, and once it is a choice you ask why choose to make the world a worse place. or Manners are an acknowledgement that other people are people. or One man can move a rock, two can move a boulder, many can move a ...


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In a famous discussion between several philosophers in the company of Cicero, they argued at length about a popular Roman maxim from that day: "The republic cannot be governed without injustice" (η δημοκρατία δεν μπορεί να κυβερνά χωρίς αδικία). Laelius is said to have strained every nerve to prove that "nothing is so hurtful to a state as injustice, and ...


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How this could happen This is definitely possible. A simple way for a parasite to accomplish most of these changes (aside from telekinesis, which I don't think has any biologically plausible explanation) by modifying the DNA of the host, likely by introducing some retrovirus into the bloodstream to selectively modify the DNA of specific types of stem cells. ...


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There was a Lord Moulton, an English judge, who spoke or wrote about the realm of manners and why it was so important to a society. I don't know the original source, but he has been quoted several times by commentator Mark Steyn, for example: Moulton divided society into three sectors, of which he considered the most important to be the "middle land" ...


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Yep, and I will give you a real world example. Tape worm • Weight loss guaranteed after ingestion, although post ingestion care must be adhered to. Weight loss = leaner you = societal acceptance The different eye colour concept is interesting, I thought about the Ebola virus that was found in a woman's eye. It would be interesting to see where you ...


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Benjamin Disraeli was an influential Conservative Prime Minister in the UK during the Victorian era. He has a number of good quotes about government, but also about civility and society, one of which: "It is knowledge that influences and equalises the social condition of man; that gives to all, however different their political position, passions ...


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1) Absolutely. From a biology perspective, try to imagine the role that an environment has on the process of evolution. Maybe there is an environmental or atmospheric reason that would mean that such an organism would NEED the protection of an advanced being. Perhaps there is a dominant predator that used to feed on the hosts of (previously docile) guest ...


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“All right," said Susan. "I'm not stupid. You're saying humans need... fantasies to make life bearable." REALLY? AS IF IT WAS SOME KIND OF PINK PILL? NO. HUMANS NEED FANTASY TO BE HUMAN. TO BE THE PLACE WHERE THE FALLING ANGEL MEETS THE RISING APE. "Tooth fairies? Hogfathers? Little—" YES. AS PRACTICE. YOU HAVE TO START OUT LEARNING TO BELIEVE ...


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Edit2: After some digging around, I finally found the perfect quote for your story. How different a creature is man in society and man in solitude! - William Godwin Perhaps you are wondering why I believe this the perfect quote for your story. This is because William Godwin (1756-1836) is a philosopher that supports anarchy, or more accurately, min-...


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So what would over a decade of non-stop labor, throughout childhood development, do to her physically? Would she be calloused and strong? I keep fixing my mind on the fact that she would be bending down quite often--could her spine be malformed? This is really interesting situation... on one hand intensive labor, on the other, the time where the human body ...


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She'd get a lot of ailments from repetitive strain injuries related to the type of work she does. For instance: Housemaid's Knee (Prepatellar bursitis) if she spends a lot of time kneeling to scrub floors or similar tasks This website mentions lye soaps and lead lined sinks damaging the hands of housemaids who wash clothes and dishes Edwardian servants ...


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A quick search on the topic of child labour and its impact on the health of the worker led me to these two papers: The Health Impact of Child Labor in Developing Countries: Evidence From Cross-Country Data and Environmental and Occupational Health Problems of Child Labour: Some Issues and Challenges for Future. They focus mainly on labour in hazardous ...


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I did some research on some of what you mentioned, since I was interested. It seems that, at first, she'd be rather sore and in pain. In fact, considering that Cinderella started at the age of 6, continuous, strenuous household work could constitute child abuse under some state or national laws. If I get time, I'll look that up to support my claim. It's ...


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Teach no genetically engineer (uplift), then teach, yes. but uplifting a species is still way beyond our ability you would need severely advanced genetic engineering, likely generations away. Our first uplift will also be a more intelligent species likely an ape (although we could drive the rest of apes extinct before we get there), lastly our first ...


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If you want to develop a 4D optical sense, you surely need some kind of advanced optical input, that is, an interface to your visual nerve, and a way to train it. Kids usually do that training by cross correlating the optical input with that from the nerves on their hands, I assume. ;) I guess you are right that a 4D brain is not necessary, although a 3D ...


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We are still at the stage that we don't know most of the molecular mechanism that how our body works. Even one day we know that, we still don't know how brain-to-mind works. So we can never be sure whether we can train monkey (or any specie that have a complex enough brain) to do advanced human things. Without theory support, the only thing we can do is to ...


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You can train apes to do human jobs, but I doubt it would be worth the trouble. Apes can understand the concept of work and payment, but their ability to grasp complex tasks is, on average, much lower than that of humans. They can also be moody, prone to distraction, and have their own personality traits that differ significantly from those of typical ...


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japan do that and most south east asian country also train monkey for certain activity, from picking coconut or other fruit to street circuss to act like human like riding bicycle,smoking, even as drug cartel, etc. i dont know about japan but the training that i know though..... is pretty much would make animal lovers like PETA mad because it choke the ...


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You can do whatever you want in the fictional world but you need to understand that they will not be monkeys in the way we know them in this reality. They have no sense of value in anything beyond basic family or troop relationships, so “money” means nothing to them. Damaging property, stealing, giving things away, will never be concepts true monkeys can ...


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Not without majorly altering the monkeys to the point where they aren't monkeys anymore and its a new subspecies. They aren't smart enough. The expression 'Monkey see, monkey do' comes to mind - they can be trained, yes. They can be trained to do things. But there's no way for them to go 'Planet of the Apes' on us. Thankfully.


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You could. However there are engineering and economic problems with that Engineering: The muscles have multiple fibers and those fibers take turns contracting. One reason is that it takes a while to deliver the oxygen and nutrients to that fiber. You also have to get rid of the waste products and the heat that is generated. To get all that strength, ...


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The farther you get from a terms origin, the less specific people tend to be. For example, the Archaic period used to refer to a specific time period in the ancient world, but now it's just anything old. People wear medieval armor at renaissance festivals, and most history buffs are just glad they got it right within a few centuries. Even the word "...


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I'd say you have nothing to worry about copyright-wise. It'll certainly be older than most classical music we have today in setting. Might want to go for things like 20th century rock and labels like that;then have them fall under the broader branch of classical. Also that way you can have neoclassical throwback bands to these old ones. I can see that being ...


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Not all old music is classical. "Classical music" in traditional sense applies to the music in classical Western tradition. There is no firm criteria, but classical music usually performed by the instruments of symphonic orchestra with strict adherence to musical sheet. We can not tell how this definition would stand in 500 years, and there is no copyright ...


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That is already man's greatest advantage. The female form is not designed to match it. The physical advantages of being a man in a pre-gunpowder fight go well beyond simple muscle mass. The hormones responsible for pushing the body past the safe zone when it comes to physical feats are adrenaline and testosterone. Men have more of these meaning that in a ...


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You can name it anything you want. You're talking about hundreds of years in the future. Humans and/or aliens might use any kind of word they want to refer to centuries-old music. It really is up to you, the author and builder of your world. However, if the music has survived, then it is possible the old labels or designations will have survived as well. ...


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The reason humans don't do 100%, unless it's an emergency, is specifically because it causes damage. Your body has been conditioned by evolution not to use that reserve unless it's life-and-death. Or breed-vs-don't-breed, which is evolution-wise, just about as bad. So you have three choices. Lower the upper limit, make the body more capable of applying the ...


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You can't. Sorry, but it's the truth. There's a reason that those normal inhibitions are in place and that's because straining your muscles like that on a consistant basis is dangerous bordering on near suicidal. It's a nice story that we have secret, hidden potential hidden and locked by our brain. But that's not the truth. The truth is that he use 100% of ...


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This is "Engineering 101". For a system, we have regular working conditions, and extreme working conditions. We can safely lift 100 lbs on a rope, or lift 200 lbs, but unsafely. To safely lift 200 lbs, we need a different, stronger rope. Then, for this stronger rope, 300 lbs would be an extreme weight, which can be lifted, but unsafely. We can't construct a ...


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Have you tried Kickstarter? With a good enough pitch you might be able to raise funds for a lethal zombie-creating bioweapon or a black hole generator or a beacon to signal hostile aliens.


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Buy a heat coil of reasonable size, then contain some anthrax from Siberian permafrost inside a metal container. Put it in the CRISPR and make it much, much more contagious. Go to JFK Airport, and go nuts. You may have to repeat several times.


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Bribe a Ph.D. student for his access to a genetic-engineering lab, design a deadly virus with long incubation period, release in the nearest international airport. You will need to know how to design such viruses. If you do not know that, use $1000 to apply to a bunch of Ph.D. programs in bioengineering. Finally, $1000 is a enough money to get a place to ...


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As Willk said, hemoglobin is a very widespread protein and just "swapping it out" in humans (or other vertebrates) is pretty much impossible, without turning your test subject into something that is most definitely not whatever you started out with. If you want to handwavium the fact that vertebrates have been using hemoglobin for the past X million years, ...


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No matter the dosage we forget some people affected wouldnt be able to deal with the audible and visual and would need people whove gone through intense 'journies' by themselves to 'show' you how to come back to reality in a good concious mind where the individuals felt safe. Itd be as if you were setting up 'guides' for 'tours'.


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The target dies painfully, unless it's an incredibly obese person. If it's an obese person, they're still in an incredible amount of pain, but might not die. Things expanding within a person's stomach falls under the category of 'things you never want happening to you'. I'm also assuming this is a 'matter of seconds' thing and not 'matter of hours' because ...


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Hemoglobin is well integrated into the organism. Swapping in foreign stuff would cause the organism to crash. There are lots of aspects of the organism that depend on the structure of hemoglobin. How it is carried in the red cell. Iron metabolism. Copper metabolism. Handling degradation products. Oxygen affinity. Really a bucketload of integral ...


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We can look at when battle lines became obsolete: WWI. Before WWI we had muskets, capable of defeating most types of armor and fired in volleys. They still used battle lines despite a single volley potentially taking out dozens of soldiers, and these people could fire many more than 4 per day. Admittedly they couldnt do it in a second long burst, but it ...


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You indicate that properly prepared shields can be used to ward off the fire attack without being too badly damaged. However, shields are only really useful in one direction at a time - if someone can come at you from an angle and get around your shield, it's worthless. On the other hand, if you form a battle line, you can make it more difficult to outflank ...


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In short: no. Having an ability to shoot fire just means the battle line can advance 3 or 4 times with fire over the course of the battle. This could be used to try to break lines, or protect friendlies in the heat of battle, but probably wouldn't be the main source of inflicting damage. When the soldiers ran out of their 4 charges of fire, the fight would ...


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A scientific article from the US National Institutes of Health titled The pathophysiological basis and consequences of fever gives a good review. From the abstract: Where heat generation exceeds heat loss and the core temperature rises above that set by the hypothalamus, a combination of cellular, local, organ-specific, and systemic effects occurs and ...


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They have syphilis. Chronic infection can cause chronic fever. Of the chronic diseases that cause fever, the big three are malaria, tuberculosis and syphilis. https://jramc.bmj.com/content/jramc/85/3/117.full.pdf Notes on the Significance of Fever in Syphilis with a Reference to Hypopyrexia" fever...may be accompanied by various symptoms including ...


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Existing sperm banks represent a huge pool of existing genetic diversity. I think you could pick up a lot of genetic diversity by: Finding women who are immune, or curing them. Isolating them (bubble boy style). Fertilize them. Girls can just leave. Boys need to be cured/immunized prior to leaving isolation. Further, women are capable of having children ...


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After the Second Anglo-Boer war in 1902, in what is now South Africa, a fairly large community (600-650 people) of Afrikaans speaking people immigrated to Argentina, South America rather than be subjected to British rule. This community was fairly isolated at first but around the 1950's they increased their interactions with the local spanish speaking ...


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The answer is money. You've already selected a company that is interested in cyogenics and accepted that they will cryogenically freeze you if you die. All you need now is a fund located at a lawyer firm (and some investors using it in safe investments to keep it a viable source of money). This fund will pay the cryogenics to keep your body stored properly ...


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Have Lots of Offsprings With having lots of offsprings its almost guaranteed that in some generation somebody would take interest in family history and respect your well-known wish. Radioactivate A Large Piece of Land Large piece of land, on the level of hundreds of square kilometers would be too much for people of future to let go without using. Just set ...


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On one hand, (1) there shouldn't be much change; but on the other hand we are speaking about (2) a small community, and specifically a small community (3) speaking Esperanto. For a normal language, there shouldn't be all that much change. Realistically, for a reasonably sized community speaking a normal language all that one could realistically expect in ...


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I think you are biased against No-nosers while it would be the Blackendwaiters who are in the serious disadvantage. Not being able to recognise colors means eating a lot of wrong things during "Hunter-gatherer" stage or even at scavenging. What worse is that it stop the ability to gather and share/pass knowledge about dangerous food items. You cannot make ...


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In a period as short of 50 years the language is not going to deviate significantly in its structure, especially since you're dealing with a literate population. Widespread literacy will tend to lock in major aspects of the language. There are real-world examples of this; French Canadian became essentially isolated from Metropolitan French following the ...


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The North/South Korean language divergence is probably the best real world analog to the scenario. The two countries have been pretty much sealed off from each other (and in North Korea's case, the rest of the world) for about 50 years.


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50 years is plenty, but the extent depends on how their history develops and how it influences their culture and technology. Here are two examples: Culture A and B both make similar discoveries, but they are not in contact so those discoveries are done by different people. Depending on how crucial those discoveries are treated by each civilization ...


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