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The apparent magnitude of the sun as seen from Earth is -26.75; when a celestial body with this brightness shines we consider it to be 'daytime'. Conversely when the full moon (magnitude -12.74) shines, we still consider it to be 'night time'; the sun is 400,000 times brighter than the full moon. Since apparent magnitude follows an inverse square law ...


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The inhabitants can calculate the height of the “star” by using simple trigonometry with people positioned at different points in its path and synchronized watches. Knowing its height the size of the star can then be calculated by measuring its angular diameter and again using trigonometry or even simpler similar triangles. It is impossible to say how ...


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Since Newtonian/Einsteinian physics clearly don't apply here, I see no reason these "stars" and "suns" couldn't be actual hydrogen-fusing stars, just flying across the (infinite?) flat world at a (handwaved) speed and (handwaved) density such that they provide the day and night cycles. If they stars have the same population distribution as those in our ...


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