New answers tagged

1

This is fairly easy. With tri-state it's even easier, but for now let's consider just using a click or silence (a la pure binary: 00101010). The answer is a lot and as quick as their memory can handle. Let's lay some ground theory: There are a small set of "proto verbs" (Incorrect terminology so I'm having trouble sourcing this), of quantity less than 30, ...


0

Chinise and Japanise (and other such a languages) has an interesting pronunciation structure: each syllable has a certain "timeframe" and those syllables are pronaunced in a rythm. There are "long" ("two-frame") syllables and "short" ("half-frame") ones, but the timing of "frame" shuold be kept. This languages have tens of syllables. But proposed language ...


9

It is essentially a binary language, just like what machines use. Unless they never stop vocalising, it isn't really binary as you have O, U and silence. Binary signals just have high and low, or on and off. Tri-state stuff is distinguished from plain old binary. How can each word be differentiated without any pauses between words? So, study of spoken ...


3

Latin written with scripta continua had words without spaces. I have observed that some modern Italian speakers also string their words together without spaces except when they need to breathe. The key I think it to recognize words as such as soon as they are spoken and mentally file each one as you hear it and get ready for the next. The other thing ...


1

I know I'm a bit late to the party, but have you considered bioluminescence and/or the ability to change colors/patterns on the skin (metachrosis)? This could be means of communication in itself, and bioluminescence could enhance the ability to communicate via gestures or posture over larger distances or murky/dark water. I guess glowing mermaids might ...


0

The means they use for non-verbal communications is very dependent on the turbidity of the water and the intensity of illumination. In low visibility conditions, they might snap their tails ultra fast so they cavity and create a popping sound. These will be higher frequency sounds and will not carry extremely far. Lower frequency sound travels further ...


0

While they may be able to use a combination of body language and/or noises they might also have hyper-developed telepathic ability.


1

Take any well known tune ("Ode to Joy" came to mind to me for its simplicity). Sing the tune with nonsense words - or perhaps alternate incorrect instructions - it is not the words that matter. Treat the notes as binary - A 0 will be "in tune" and a 1 will be "off key". Has the prerequisite that the encoder has reasonable singing ability (otherwise the ...


5

Summary You could use amplitude or frequency modulation of the voice to transfer data between 5 WPM (realistic maximum) and 20 WPM (probably superhuman). You could go arbitrarily high with synthetics or cybernetic implants (up to around 5 billion WPM). Essentially, it involves slightly (or greatly, if stealth isn't an issue) raising and lowering your ...


2

I'm not sure exactly what you're trying to rule out with your first bullet. Are you just ruling out simply jumbling the words or adding a bunch of null words, i.e. you don't want someone to be able to see the clear words in the song? Or do you mean that the spoken words cannot be used in any way? Because there are lots of ways to encode a message in a cover ...


2

Steganography has already been brought up, but not the best method for it. Modern Steganography usually involves encoding binary into the least significant values of a media file which can be extracted by comparing a secret original file to the modified one to extract the differences. This creates such small variances that they are indistinguishable from ...


2

Singing: Encoded in nonsense There are a bunch of answers that cover spoken word. Many of them while slightly noticeable in normal conversation/speech would be extremely obvious when sung. There's no reason to not have two (or three if you have something else planned for screaming) different means of encoding your message. Many songs have nonsense lyrics ...


4

Many have covered encoding messages into speaking or writing, but I didn't see any covering singing. There are many languages like Mandarin or Cantonese that use tonality to change the meaning of a word. Using tonality in a language that doesn't naturally ascribe meaning to it, especially during song, is a great way to hide messages. For example, "forward"...


3

Morse is what probably comes to mind first, but, as pointed out, it is incredibly low density. If you can have the pitch of the voice change by 16 distinguishable levels, you can use it to encode hex codes, which are reasonably denser way of encoding something than Morse. Since you probably only need to encode 26 letters + 10 numbers, it gives us 36 hex ...


16

You can scream if you like, because it's not the sounds that matter, it's the silences between them. The gaps between the words are what counts, whether you choose to encode in Morse or otherwise. The cadence of speech includes the gaps as well as the sounds and a bit of careful timing will allow you to pass the message. The major downside of anything ...


5

Something like Jeremiah Denton? As a POW, in a televised interview he blinked t-o-r-t-u-r-e in morse code. https://youtu.be/rufnWLVQcKg


10

You could hide the message in the word order where grammar allows it (obviously that works the better the more the used language allows to reorder words). For example, consider the sentence: Today I'll have pizza for lunch. You can move "today" and "for lunch" to many different positions: I'll have pizza today for lunch. I'll have pizza for lunch ...


12

Breath and word count The simplest form of encoding I can come up with is this: Wether Bob speaks or sings, pay attention to when he breathes. Count the number of words between each breath. It will be a number between one and eight. (If not, it is meaningless noice, a filler) By combining two such numbers the scheme allows for 64 characters, more than ...


6

Steganography is the encoding and decoding of information hidden in plain sight within pictures, audio files, whatever. It's much easier if you allow hardware in the mix - for example, encoding a message in the noise below the audible level, or adjusting the frequency of each tone by just enough that the difference can be measured but not heard. But you ...


19

Morse code and syllable length - that is, use syllable length to encode a message in Morse code so a long syllable for a dash, a short one of a dot. Easy to decode if intercepted - yes, absolutely. But you didn't mention the possibility that anyone was listening in to find a hidden message, just that it needed to be encoded. Without any training, it'll be ...


4

My first thought was that you can use principles of steganography here. but you've rejected the simpler patterns in the first bullet (there should not be any link to the hidden message within the words of Bobs utterance). So, next option. Most people speak from the mouth, not nasally. You can try to have Bob speak regular words nasally. Choose any two type ...


0

Leaving aside the problem of actually deciphering the message in 50,000 years, there is one storage medium that is almost guaranteed to make it. Say it with diamonds. Most natural diamonds have ages between 1 billion and 3.5 billion years. Diamond is possibly the most chemically and physically stable material we know. Most natural diamonds were created ...


1

One detail about Alcubierre drives, which we handwave away as quickly as the setting allows for convenience, is the trouble with controlling the warp from within the warp. The most "practical" way to achieve this (for definitions of "practical" that involve megastructures) is to build what amounts to a tunnel or track, or analogous system, that controls the ...


3

If Albucierre drives exist, does this imply that communications can travel no faster than the Albucierre driven vessels? Yes. But that doesn't actually mean anything. Because Alcubierre drives can travel through time. If the only technology in your setting not backed by modern hard science is the Alcubierre drive, then there is no other technology in your ...


3

Not necessarily. The Alcubierre metric merely describes a space-time that is compressed in front of your spacecraft and expanded behind it. The assumption has always been that the warp field comes from the craft inside the bubble, but this isn't required to be the case. An interesting thing about the Alcubierre metric is that it looks almost identical to the ...


1

How about if we throw Braille out of the room for a bit. Instead, think of something that combine the other senses. First thing that comes to mind was the musical instrument used to make the music in the movie Forbidden Planet. The idea is to make it more accurate and able to response to hands and fingers movements in 3D. Sound would tell the user where ...


2

This reminds me of the braille interface that the character "Whistler," played by David Strathairn, used in the movie "Sneakers." Maybe they are real things but it would take a non-blind person to build these things. As an alternate path you can focus on the person. Blind people could become very adept at quickly processing streams of data and making ...


0

So a computer doesn't need to be print-derivative But it's very inefficient for users if it isn't. According to this Quora question, Braille reading speeds are around 125 words/minute on average, and may reach as high as 200 words/minute for exceptional Braille readers. For telegraph operators, Morse code was even slower - according to Wikipedia, around 20 ...


1

Full VR The best (short of the self imposed limitations) would be a full VR system with haptic feedback and line of sight tracking with voice recognition. Full VR means the pilot has a 360 degree unobstructed view. Voice commands mean he can just say what he wants such as "target" or "zoom in" or "arm photon torpedos" etc Body tracking with haptic ...


4

It wouldn't be a language so much as a giant ass board full of buttons. A fusion between a pilots cockpit and a keyboard, with commands reduced down to button presses and a specifically designed script language. Firstly, I want to point out that humans are terrible at multi tasking. We don't actually multitasks. We just switch between the two tasks fast ...


6

There's a story from the age of the Altair. The Altair was one of the first computers that a hobbyist could afford. You put it together yourself, and then hopefully it worked. It became an odd solution in search of a problem. Nobody quite knew what to do with it. There were "computing clubs" where people met to try to figure out what it could do. In ...


2

I think that computers would develop very different mechanisms to display information. Some form of Braille dot matrix that stimulated 5 or 10 fingers at a time would run out a practicality for many applications. It would work for simple question answer type problems, but data visualization wouldn’t work well. But, humans have sensitive skin on their faces ...


66

Youngsters. The first computers read and wrote punched cards or punched paper tape; they did not have any kind of user interface where being blind or sighted mattered. It was perceived as major revolution when some smart technician adapted a typewriter to be able to print computer output; electric teletypewriters were then adapted so that operators could ...


5

I think a good technology to consider in comparison is the telegraph. The telegraph also began as a technology processing bits of information that while accessible, in that they used the sound/touch of tapping, was also cumbersome to use in that it required the user to learn a specialized code to both input and interpret. So, you had a specialized profession ...


9

I think the biggest difference would be in the development of user interfaces. If computers had been designed primarily by and for blind users, I imagine a much more sophisticated version of the Refreshable Braille Display would be in common use by now. I'm imagining a grid of keys instead of a single row forming a kind of tactile screen. This would allow ...


14

I see no differences in how computer would have developed. The first computers used punched cards to take input and give output (one of the favorite prank among nerds in those days was to swap two random cards in the physical folder containing them, when the owner was not paying attention), and graphics came much later. And the reason is that when you move ...


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