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Your scenario has a big problem: Trapped lakes will in time become saltwater lakes. Instead, you want your water to drain through the ground. You'll need some high, steep mountains to surround the area. They are volcanic but not explosive so they keep building up rather than blowing themselves to bits. The passes are upwards of 20,000' and thus ...


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A large enough desert with no water sources would be impossible for medieval humans to cross. An extreme enough mountain range would also be close to impossible, especially if there are no passes. You could put the humans on a piece of land bounded on some sides by desert, and some by mountains. They would get their fresh water from these mountains, but the ...


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It won't be easy, but I can think of a few possibilities, though they require rather unlikely geography. Large, circular valley: You have this large valley surrounded by tall mountains from which rivers run into a central system of lakes. There is a balance between evaporation and added water, or maybe there is an underground river that drains the lakes. ...


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There are many types of terrain that would have presented a barrier to medieval people. Although mountains could be crossed via passes, mountains were seen as dangerous places and were generally avoided if at all possible. Very tall mountain ranges such as the Himalayas would have presented formidable obstacles especially if the passes were snow bound and ...


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Mudflats. Their island/continent, which is nowhere more than a few feet above sea level, is completely surrounded by miles of sticky mudflat. The tides are so slight that any point they can reach from solid ground is never covered by more than inches of water, preventing use of even shallow draft boats. Any attempt to cross the flats on foot or with land ...


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Probably not the direction you want to go, but if you make the land rich, fertile and with no big hazards (no typhoons, no quakes, no volcanos, no sudden floods, no draughts), humans would have less reasons to move somewhere else. Sort of an ancient Egypt like land, but on an island to prevent expansion wars, which require travels.


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If they have the skills to pass the checks to build the ship and leave let them. Then give them a monster, then tsunami, ect otherwise they don't leave the island because either it moves because it's ontop of an animal making the land they came from further and further away from them so they can't sail there with whatever supplies they can muster. Or else ...


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Below Sea Level A possible alternative is that the majority of your continent is actually below sea level, and you have something like a mountain range or various tall terrain features which actively prevent the sea from rising up and flooding everything (Think of the interior of Australia). Due to some extreme circumstances this natural barrier was ...


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End of ice age A lot of "land" on Earth is actually ice and snow coming all the way from the seafloor. For example, during some ice ages you could go from nowadays Russia to nowadays Alaska by foot. The ice bridge was also probably more than a mile above nowadays sea level. Also check the answers for What would an Antarctica without ice look like compared ...


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Define "rapid", but in the terms you're talking about no, there isn't. All the examples we have of submerged continents required millions of years to subside, and even then most of them still have portions above water. There isn't a realistic geological process that could cause such rapid subsidence over the sizes of land you'd be wanting that also didn't ...


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Perhaps long ago a super advanced civilization decided that the planet didn't have enough land area and so built artificial continents. Instead of bringing stone from stony asteroids and piling it up on the sea floor to build continents that were giant rock piles, for some reason the civilization imported a lot of metal from metallic asteroids and built ...


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Introduce a moon. Without a moon, the planet won't have any tides, so the sea level won't experience any short cycles. Add a moon, and you suddenly have variations in water height which on Earth can be as much as 15m. With a bigger, more massive moon you could easily induce even larger tides, enough to flood the majority of a low-lying continent. Note ...


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This depends a lot on your intentions, You can set out some rough guidelines (I need a bunch of islands and a big desert on the same continent as some quality farmland) and then work from there, figuring out what you need to get it. But if you get too detailed you will end up having to change things. The other approach is just to create a world and write ...


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You can make your worlds flow somewhat realistically by considering climate and airflow. Using your example of a desert next to mountains, you could have only dry air hitting the desert side of the mountains, causing most of the streams to flow down the other side. Putting hot biomes near the equator is another example of considering climate, because ...


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It sounds like what you're describing is just a continent that's higher in the north than in the south. All you need there is a continental collision where your 'plateau' continent starts riding up over the one it's colliding with. That's exactly how the Himalayas happened, and unless I'm missing something, the entire Indian Subcontinent is a perfect example ...


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Crack creatures. Super hard things crack. Your ocean would be traversed with immense cracks, and look like the surface of Europa. Nutrients, water and other things needed for life would be concentrated into these cracks and these 2-dimensional crack ecosystems would therefore be good places for life. Photosynthesizers would take up residence in the crack ...


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Some scattered thoughts -- In a glass world - I imagine some form of silicon based life. The storms you describe remind me of sand-blasting and the kinds of rubbery materials used to block off the particles. This suggests the creature or being would have a silicone skin that constantly grows and sheds in tiny piece somewhat like our own skin. Glass though ...


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Creatures would have to either live under deep canyons that have been eroded by time, Well, what is doing the erosion? Wind and sand? Probably not very good places to shelter! or be able to actually dig there way into the glass. You've already stated the glass is "super-hard". This rather limits the ability of any creature to dig into it. Even if they ...


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The short answer is the higher the level of technology, the less that culture depends on geography. But the initial trajectory of a culture is shaped by geography. Primitive and early humans were completely at the mercy of their environment. If you live next to a river, then you have a chance of setting up agriculture. If not, then you're stuck with hunting-...


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You need to keep digging for stuff. Lots of good examples here. Here's a few more: Mediterranean soils tend to be loose and sandy. Tillage was in effect done with a sharp stick, dragged back and forth in a cross hatch pattern by oxen. northern soils were heavy clay, and farming was essentially impossible until the creation of the mouldboard plow. The ...


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Ice Age Climate Climates and Geography While there are situations where shifting equator-ward (and colder climates shift downward with altitude too remember) may not be the precisely right answer, that is generally the case so long as you remember a few points colder weather may change currents that would bring different weather fronts which would change ...


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Your story is set in California. It is a very cool thing to site your story in a fictional past of the real world. That lets you riff off of real and legendary things from our world and also frame things out in terms of real geography. A prime example: Robert Howard’s Hyborian Age for the Conan stories is set in Europe around 10,000 BC. A more recent and ...


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Campania You main character lives in Campania, one of the most fertile and pleasant regions of Italy, probably somewhere near Capua. It being a region in Italy, mountains are never far away. (It is situated on the western side of the peninsula, south of the central region of Lazio.) The land is exceptionally fertile; agriculture has been the main business ...


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a cold volcanic [...] moderately toxic soil to the extent that the people there have an inborn resistance to it and can in fact be quite healthy and strong, but many are noticeably diseased and/or deformed. This can be a volcanic region, with an active volcano and a significant release of radon from the ground. an ocean, ideally warm, that experiences ...


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Adding a new answer in order to respond to your new image. This one is much better! Personally, I think you should always work with an image with an aspect ratio of 2:1. This is a special kind of projection called the plate carrée projection, and this kind of projection has no distortion at all near the equator. During my original calculations, I thought ...


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Free software like Blender lets you easily draw onto a sphere, and then unwrap to an equirectangular projected map.


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Geography in a society determines more than you think, in fact everything Jared Diamond, professor of Geography and Anthropology at the University of California, is a strong advocate of Culture linked to Geography, as outlined in his books Guns Germs and Steel, and Collapse. Fundamentally, he asked himself the question Why did the Spanish invade the Aztecs ...


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There are a few powerful factors. Productivity: You are not going to have large sessile communities on unproductive ground, large cities require fertile ground and plenty of water just to keep themselves fed and watered. So what we call "civilization" (large populations, specialized labor, advanced technology) always start in places with high fertility and ...


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The quality of a map depends on the society that creates it. If your world is swords and sorcery, then ignore "reality" and stick with maps that represent what the society knows and believes. If your world is early tech, then a mix of both "reality" and "classic" maps might make sense. If you world is spaceships and sky stations, then go with a globe. ...


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Culture is deeply connected to food. Just look at any culture you can think of and they all have dishes they identify as their food, owning it either by ingredients or the way ingredients are treated. Believes and traditions grow on to what first began as simple environmental conditions, providing certain food, disallowing for others. Geography forms ...


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1) Our species evolved on the savanna and by standards of the animal kingdom, we're master long distance runners. Our brains have neurons connected much more than in other animal ones, give edge not only for abstract thinking but also for hunting animals by running them in to total exhaustion. Not sure whether you can change that for purpose of your story. ...


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You could do like GURPS and use an unfolded icosahedron ("d20") for planetary maps. Each triangle has very little distortion, and you can easily turn it into an icosahedral globus. Here is a map of the Earth done this way: For regional maps, you can put any two adjacent triangles together as a rhombus (diamond) shape.


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I think you need to decide what you want this map for. If it's meant to help you with worldbuilding, it's more important to get the projection right. If it's meant to be used in-universe, like if a character in your story made it, it actually might make more sense to have it not to scale at all. Historically speaking, maps that look like a bird's eye view ...


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Dispense with realism. https://earlychurchhistory.org/politics/the-roman-empire-china/ Depicted is a round map of the world, supposedly as the Romans knew it. This map has been much copied; I struggled but could not find where this image originally came from. If someone can find it please post link. In any case - you can make a fine map and not get ...


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try and think about which factors of the land are constant, and then let your imagination run from there. what sort of culture can you imagine sprouting from each area? it shouldn't hold you back, just offer some seedlings or cores for your 'traditional' cultural identities. before things get modern, you'll notice that culture is closely tied to the land. ...


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Geography has some influence on the culture of the people living in a certain region, though it is not the only force shaping it. Look at the USA. Without the vast spaces opening to the west, the Anglo-german colonists of the 13 colonies would have hardly changed their home culture into the one of the self made man. You can also see how the sports which are ...


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Let's try some examples. The Italians live in the exact same geography where the Romans lived. The Romans built a great empire which endured for a long time, and has greatly influenced legal and political systems throughout the world to this day. The Italians spent a full millennium divided into many small states waging funny little wars between them, and ...


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I have dealt with this problem many times. When it comes down to fixing a map you've already designed, while changing as little as possible, unfortunately you'll need to decide what is the most import aspects of the shape, scale, and distances of your world. To make it fit a sphere, it will need to be changed in some way. Consider my original map: Pretty ...


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I hope you like oranges The first thing you need to do is peel an orange. Now lay the pieces out in order in a rectangle. Doesn't work? Of course it doesn't, a sphere doesn't map onto a rectangle without major distortion somewhere. Now you could try drawing your maps onto an orange, but what you've really done here is generate an interrupted map projection....


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According to the USGS it would look like this: Source: https://water.usgs.gov/edu/gallery/global-water-volume.html The larger sphere represents all of Earth's water, while the smaller sphere represents Earth's fresh water. The larger sphere has a diameter of 1384 km, quite large but only 0.13% of the total volume of the Earth. Ice has a density 92% that ...


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Based on your rather unreasonable requirements that it hasn't been broken into. The cottage will look almost pristine.... on the outside. The wall boards will have shrunk. There will be gaps in the walls. This will allow free air flow, keeping the structure somewhat dry. The roof will sag a bit because those tiles will leak. If it has never gotten any ...


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So, lets say there's about $1.8*10^{21}$kg of water on the surface of the earth (this excludes hydrates and stuff in the mantle, but the surface stuff seems like the bit most likely to be deposited by impacts after earth's formation). Given the density of ice, $920kg/m^3$, that much water would form a solid sphere about 776km in radius. That's Quite Big, by ...


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If you want to have the total hydrosphere being delivered on a single impact, let's first check the mass The total mass of Earth's hydrosphere is about $1.4 \cdot 10^{18}$ tonnes That means $1.4 \cdot 10^{21}$ kg. As references, Mimas has a mass of $3 \cdot 10^{19}$ kg, while Enceladus has a mass of $1.0 \cdot 10^{20}$ kg. That's a major impact. As a ...


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Estimates for the mass of the Chicxulub impactor that offed the dinosaurs range from 1015 and 4.6 $\times$ 1017 kilograms. The hydrosphere's mass is currently estimated to be around 1.4 $\times$ 1021 kilograms. That is like 10,000 Chicxulubs in terms of orders of magnitude, if we use the upper bound for Chic's mass. Might be more like 100,000 dino-killing ...


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I used to work as a forester in Canada, where we do have temperate climate (although somewhat on the colder side of the spectrum, I must admit). I've seen several habitations and other abandoned things through my days in the bushes, so I have some range through my assessment. First, was it build to last? It seems so from your description, yet most of the ...


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It will be destroyed. There are two factors you mention that will do it: Trees - they will not only add the possibility of falling on the house but each fall they add weight to the roof with leaves. Those leaves also rise the floor level around the house that is rotting. So any fauna that could benefit from wet, warm environment and like to eat wood would ...


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It will be pretty run down, especially if it is made of wood. Vegetation will have taken possession of the surroundings. I have seen such places during my vacations in some remote areas of rural Japan, they have their sinister appeal. Here is what can be found online: Fascinating footage shows an explorer uncovering an abandoned Japanese village that ...


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The planet has an eccentric orbit around a gigantic microwave emitter Many high-energy cosmic objects - the most notable being neutron stars and black holes - emit high levels of microwave radiation. Your planet orbits one of these (alternatively, a binary star where one of the pair is a neutron star or black hole) and has a highly eccentric (elliptical) ...


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Magnetic moon in an eccentric orbit. Your planet has a moon. It is magnetic. The moon has an eccentric orbit. It gets very close to its planet during the close part, skimming the atmosphere. It orbits its planet every 3 days. When the moon gets close, its magnetic field induces current in metallic regions of your planet. Metallic inclusions in the ...


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It can't. Two things: first, where is it getting supplies from? Northern Wisconsin has this thing called "winter" and that means burning some kind of fuel, and that leaves evidence, whether it's clearcutting forest or someone buying fuel and transporting it. A community of 5000 people is no small thing when it comes to this subject. Also, water. Several ...


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