New answers tagged

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Yes, it kind of already happens There is a point on high mountains where humans cannot permanently live at that altitude because there is not enough oxygen for them to live there long-term. They can only go there short periods of time, bring oxygen with them, or die. However, birds have been observed living at these altitudes with little problem, and bar-...


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Eclipses of your moons. Such a large planet would be almost certain to have a number of moons. Their eclipses would be more frequent and long lasting (assuming they were close to the planet, i.e., not typical of interplanetary differences). Without details, can't calculate the Roche limit, but I suppose it would be a few hundred thousand kilometers (e.g., ...


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Sunrise and sunset - assuming the atmosphere is as thick and as dense as on Earth, you will see the daystar much redder (may be red enough not to see it at all) when it is near the horizon.


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The big clue is that you'll never see something disappear over the horizon. On an Earth-sized planet, the horizon is about 5 km away. Under ideal atmospheric conditions, you can see things up to 300 km away. Seeing something drop below the horizon is no problem. On a Sun-sized planet, the horizon is now 550 km away, but atmospheric conditions are no ...


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This answer assumes that your planet is spherical and relies on basic trigonometry to estimate the circumference of the planet. Method 1: Eratosthenes' method I believe, even with your reflected light sources, you could still estimate the size of the planet using Eratosthenes' method, i.e. at noon, measure the length of the shadow of a standard length ...


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Absolutely (given clear environmentals). The sight distance is over 10 times as much (https://planetcalc.com/1198/ if you want to formula) on the sun compared to earth. Granted, your eyes won't be able to see the entirety of this distance even given perfect atmospheric conditions, but the difference will be noticeable. Summed up another way, the difference ...


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Ignoring gravitation and the movement of the sun which I will assume are fixed to be as on Earth, the world would appear very similar to ours, but the differences would be noticable. In a great many places where people live the horizon is blocked by high grounds, woods, vegetation or other buildings. But where the line of sight was uninterrupted such as on ...


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The biggest visual clue that you're on a much larger planet than Earth is a mismatch between atmospheric haze (related to distance), perspective, and horizon distance. A ship out at sea, for instance, would have much more perspective "shrinking" and haze coverage while still above the horizon than you're used to. If you have any ability to measure distance,...


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Mountains separate climates in surprising ways. Consider the Atlas Mountains that separate the Mediterranean Basin from the Sub Saharian African area. A river like the Nile can also explain why an area is fertile in an otherwise arid region. A third factor are oceanic currents, that alter temperature ranges and with it wind currents.


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I suspect that the border between Arizona and Australia would not be too difficult to arrange as both are hot and arid. The snow covered mountains could be arranged simply by having very tall mountains with a moist prevailing wind. Raising the altitude of the air would produce a drop in temperature and the water would condense. At a high enough altitude it ...


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One problem with your model is that tectonic upheaval does not precede erosion: it is a simultaneous process. For example the Colorado river flows through a plateau in the form of the Grand Canyon. A river flowed there and the land rose up against it slowly enough that the river just kept on trucking. Something similar happened at the Amazon but the Andes ...


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As an alternative to the stratovolcano, lone peaks can form from an intrusion of hard rock into soft rock (e.g. igneous into sedimentary). If the soft rock layer then becomes exposed, and erodes away, the intrusion is left standing. A famous example is Devil's tower (from Close Encounters): This doesn't look very Middle Earthy (and is probably too small to ...


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Erebor is NOT "a single peak in the middle of a vast plain". If you look at Tolkien's maps, you see that not far to the north and west, there's a mountain range, an offshoot of the Misty Mountains. To the east are the Iron Hills, while there appears to be hilly country to the southeast. As the other answers have said, a stratovolcano seems to be the best ...


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When I was doing the geography for my homebrewed world, I had an idea of how much time I wanted trips between some of the major locations to take. With that time frame in mind, I researched how quickly people could travel in real life. For example, one trip I looked at for my world was the trade route across the Shatterstones Desert. To figure that out, I ...


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Load the image in your favorite image editor. In my case, that's Paint Shop Pro. The image is 3112 pixels wide by 2672 pixels high. Note that I cropped the image so that the continent fills it completely. Using the tools of the image editor, fill the continent red, the sea blue, the lakes sky blue. Note that your coast lines are not continuous, that is, ...


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It’s not really possible at least with the materials and technology we have today. A massive structure with a high mass would make subduction easier. A massive structure with low mass would be better as it would tend to “float” but would suffer from a lot of other major issues. Firstly it would have to last millions of years to be properly tested. It would ...


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Not really sure if it fits, but Sandia mountain just to the east of Albuquerque might give you something. Sandia and Manzano are two connected mountains that are several miles from other nearby mountains. As I understand it, they formed by two plates hitting each other and pushing up, like a lot of other ranges. Sandia is unusual in that the western plate ...


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Since you have the Koppen map, which gives your precipitation and climate information, as well as the topographical map which gives you your altitude, you may find the Holdridge System elegant and effective to suit your needs with the information you have. Considering the three axis system uses temperature, humidity, and latitude to indicate likely biome ...


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Kilimanjaro is a "fairly lonely mountain". From a distance, it looks like it just stands in the middle of the African plain. Get closer, and you can see the smaller mountains of the Virunga region nearby, but from a hundred kilometers, it's hard to see the mountain as anything but "lonely". Kilimanjaro isn't a shield volcano, it's a stratovolcano. ...


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Have a geological hot spot sitting under a relatively stationary tectonic plate. Those hot spots are areas beneath the Earth's crust where the magma is particularly hot. This causes the magma at that location to push up through the crust and create a volcano. This is seen a lot in the Pacific island chains, Hawaii being a very visible (and still active) ...


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Stratovolcano seems to be a better fit for the "Lone Mountain" or Tolkien lore than the shield volcano. Shield volcanoes are very gradual, I don't think they match the idea of a mountain depicted in Tolkien's work. There are real life examples of standalone stratovolcanoes, like Mount Kilimanjaro.


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Very difficult. After WW2, there was no appetite for another war. The general mood of the Allies was that of rebuilding, recovering and ensuring it never happened again. The public of both the US, UK and other allies would never be swayed to start another large war. The mood was such that the UN was established with the strong mandate to prevent further ...


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Depending on exactly how your story handles the warlords, China would be comparable to Russia, only more so. A latecomer to industrialization, with plenty of internal challenges, but a sufficiently tyrannical leader might get a remarkable industrial growth, percentage-wise, since he is starting from such a low level. And lots and lots of inefficient industry ...


3

To answer the specific question of whether or not the land to water ratio is too much to cause a significant problem; assuming all other aspects of the Earth's position and movement within the solar system are roughly equivalent, no, not too significantly. Really it is pretty close to the land water ratio of Earth as Earth is at a ratio of 29/71. It is ...


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Seattle, at half a million in the city proper and over two million in the metro area, is perfect, relative to your description. It has one of the most recognizable skyline landmarks on Earth, the Space Needle (erected for the 1962 World's Fair); for those who've been there, other downtown buildings will add to the certainty -- the Bank of America tower, ...


3

Chicago after the Fall. Your problem finding a city with rapids is that the uncontrolled movement of water that creates rapids would also produce dangerous conditions for the city. They would tame it. Not to mention rapids = a power source that would be easy to tap by erecting a waterwheel. Sioux Falls, South Dakota was build around a steep downhill ...


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Virtually every city fulfills one or more of these criteria. All cities need a hinterland of arable farmland, and most cities are built on trade, so being at a river, the convergence of two rivers or where a river runs into the sea, so you can have a port, is always beneficial. As an example, most industrial cities on the Great Lakes were sited to either ...


1

If you didn't require rapids specifically, St. Louis would fit the bill. The Gateway Arch gives it an instantly recognizable skyline, it's got the Mississippi river running right by it, and it's surrounded by farm land with plenty of small wild animals. Unfortunately, while difficult to navigate for other reasons, the Mississippi is a rather wide, slow-...


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