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Eclipses of your moons. Such a large planet would be almost certain to have a number of moons. Their eclipses would be more frequent and long lasting (assuming they were close to the planet, i.e., not typical of interplanetary differences). Without details, can't calculate the Roche limit, but I suppose it would be a few hundred thousand kilometers (e.g., ...


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Sunrise and sunset - assuming the atmosphere is as thick and as dense as on Earth, you will see the daystar much redder (may be red enough not to see it at all) when it is near the horizon.


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The big clue is that you'll never see something disappear over the horizon. On an Earth-sized planet, the horizon is about 5 km away. Under ideal atmospheric conditions, you can see things up to 300 km away. Seeing something drop below the horizon is no problem. On a Sun-sized planet, the horizon is now 550 km away, but atmospheric conditions are no ...


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This answer assumes that your planet is spherical and relies on basic trigonometry to estimate the circumference of the planet. Method 1: Eratosthenes' method I believe, even with your reflected light sources, you could still estimate the size of the planet using Eratosthenes' method, i.e. at noon, measure the length of the shadow of a standard length ...


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Absolutely (given clear environmentals). The sight distance is over 10 times as much (https://planetcalc.com/1198/ if you want to formula) on the sun compared to earth. Granted, your eyes won't be able to see the entirety of this distance even given perfect atmospheric conditions, but the difference will be noticeable. Summed up another way, the difference ...


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Ignoring gravitation and the movement of the sun which I will assume are fixed to be as on Earth, the world would appear very similar to ours, but the differences would be noticable. In a great many places where people live the horizon is blocked by high grounds, woods, vegetation or other buildings. But where the line of sight was uninterrupted such as on ...


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The biggest visual clue that you're on a much larger planet than Earth is a mismatch between atmospheric haze (related to distance), perspective, and horizon distance. A ship out at sea, for instance, would have much more perspective "shrinking" and haze coverage while still above the horizon than you're used to. If you have any ability to measure distance,...


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The tallest mostly wooden structure ever built in pre modern times was probably the legendary Yongning Pagoda at Luoyang, capital of the Northern Wei dynasty in northern China. The Yongning Pagoda was described in Record of the Buddhist Monasteries in Loyang to be 90 Zhang high and 100 Zhang with the spire, or 330 meters (1082.68 feet), but in the ...


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For state-of-the-art in timber buildings, you can see that a lot of people are talking about (and even planning) plyscrapers that are over 300m tall. The super-tall wooden building industry isn't exactly in its infancy, but there isn't a huge amount of experience out there, and it seems like things can only improve from there. For a very handwavey maximum, ...


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I did some search for the world's largest wooden structures. Some sources point at the Kondo, a.k.a. Great Buddha Hall as the largest one. It's about 18.5 meters tall, and 15.2 meters wide. Technology made it possible to build bigger wood structures. The Superior Dome in Michigan is 44 meters tall (143 ft) and 163 meters wide (536 ft). A company named ...


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