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I chellange your premises, that a second heart will help if the first heart is stabbed. You will lose many liters of blood thru that open wound gushing high pressure blood. In a minute you will faint, in five you will be dead. And your second heart make things worse by giving the enemy another place to stab and drain you dry.


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The problem there, as others have said, is that this will still be pumping blood around, past whatever hole was made to damage the original heart, and if that heart stopped beating because of blood loss, then it won't help at all. The only time it'd actually really be helpful is if the heart stopped beating... in which case the fix would want to be a second, ...


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Immediately behind the genitals. If you get maimed there you're not gonna want to live anyway.


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The most "realistic" thing that I could imagine would be for the redundant heart to really be a kind of "heart seed", maybe the size of a hazelnut or walnut which would be located for example on the aortic arc, or somewhere nearby. There's enough fatty tissue in the mediastinum so you could place it there. Not only is being stabbed in the heart actually ...


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The real problem is discrete parts. What you need is the ability for specialized cells to quickly change specialty. So that any cell in your body could more or less instantly become any other kind of cell based on need. Maybe even redundant, distributed memory storage throughout the body so that the brain's contents could be rebuilt. Then it's really ...


-4

In a "Bag of Holding" Since we're using magic anyway, let the redundant heart, as well as some sort of reservoir of extra blood, an extra lung or two, with a large supply of oxygen to supply them, and while we're at it a supply of glucose that can be quickly added to supply immediate energy needs; all be inside a magical container that is larger on its ...


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Two redundant hearts, one under each foot. This placement capitalizes on energy that would otherwise be wasted, by using the fall of the body onto the foot to compress the heart and drive blood effectively back up from the lowest part of the body. The accessory hearts would pressurize the venous system and facilitate blood return, improving blood supply ...


0

There's quite a lot of plumbing to make the blood flow through the lungs and then through the body. If you put the 'standby' heart anywhere other than the chest cavity you end up running major high pressure blood vessels from the 'standby' to your chest. There's the veinous return from the body of oxygen depleted blood, a semi high pressure feed to the lungs,...


4

The lower abdomen / pelvic region. In order for the secondary heart to be effective there has to be damage which causes cardiac arrest without major haemorrhaging. This would include blunt trauma to heart or questionably minor puncture wounds which would manage to stop the heart. In this cause the use of a secondary heart could be beneficial if it appeared ...


42

In the event the first heart goes down, (suppose someone stabs you clean through it, for instance) the second heart kicks in and keeps the blood pumping through your body. So what you mean is, instead of dying in ten seconds or so as the blood pressure in your brain drops to zero, instead your magic super soldier get to live for a minute or so going "augh! ...


1

It's a dormant organ, that upon the demise of the first heart, sprout and injects itself... In this case, it isn't really a redundant heart, right? It is a replacement heart. It would make sense to keep it near the old one. That way, it can sprout into place and you won't have a gaping hole in your chest. As the other answer notes, the main problem isn't ...


0

The diaphragm. There is already some space there to allow the muscles of the diaphragm to expand and contract with your breath. The presence of another heart in this area would mean the abdomen would not contract as fully on an exhale; perhaps magic users can be spotted by a bit of a protruding belly on an otherwise slender frame. Plus the aorta already ...


73

I'm going to issue a framing challenge here, because I think you're asking the wrong question. If you're trying to make it more likely for someone to survive battlefield injuries, a redundant heart isn't really what you need. Damage to the heart isn't what causes most people to die on the battlefield. What kills them is exsanguination. It doesn't matter if ...


2

Remember cordyceps? That fungus that causes ants to go mad? It was initially thought that it affected their nervous system, but it has been discovered recently that cordyceps leaves ants' neurons intact. It attaches directly to muscle, which is even creepier. So you don't want an invasive method. Imagine if you will a fungus that grows outside the body, on ...


2

Theoretically you could do this using magnetic stimulation of neurons. The magnetic field induces an electrical potential in the neuron which actives the neurons and it can work from (small) distance without requiring electrodes on the body. Current devices are pretty coarse and can only affect moderately large areas of the brain either by activating or ...


1

Hypothetically speaking a device placed at the base of the skull or where the nervous system begins? It would need to have incredibly fast processing and be capable of redirecting the electrical signals you brain sends to your muscles. Or initiate those signals remotely considering that if you are trying to control someone it would be easily foiled if they ...


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