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I'm basically searching for an ATP that can be used to supply cells and also have its energy extracted efficiently into a basic form of explosive material (the stronger the better) without a lot of additional energy being added. By replacing ATP you have completely upended the metabolic processes behind the cell to the point where it may as well be ...


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Two possibilities: 1) You want a dust explosion. There are lots of materials that, if you have a pile of them or if they are at all wet, then they won't burn very well at all. Consider ordinary wheat flour, for example. A pile of flour will work quite well to extinguish small flames. And you don't need to be concerned about having many 10's of kg of flour ...


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Your explosive salt is saltpeter. http://www.salt.org.il/frame_saltpet.html Nitre, potassium nitrate KNO3, more commonly knownas saltpetre, is formed in warm climates by bacterial action during the decomposition ofexcreta and vegetable refuse. Where people and animals live in close proximity, debrisaccumulates in and around their homes. The contact ...


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When it come to energy release, the difference between an explosion and not is simply in the reaction rate: a fast reaction leads to a equally fast energy release, thus an explosion. Therefore if you want an ATP bomb, just have a lot of ATP reacts really quickly. Maybe you can remove the controlling enzimes, and let the reaction runaway.


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Limpet teeth and abalone shells Limpet teeth are the hardest known biological substance, and also among the strongest. The tensile strength of limpet tooth samples... and the corresponding elastic modulus... are 4.90 ± 1.90 and 120 ± 30 GPa, respectively. in terms of vickers that would be between 268 and 646 kg m−1 m−2 Since it is both hard AND strong it ...


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Hardness is useful for protection, but only up to a point. Maybe you can find something better. Shaped-charge weapons (aka HEAT arounds) produce a hypervelocity jet which penetrates via what amounts to erosion. Hardness becomes irrelevant at such speeds. Hence the most effective armor either relies on density (depleted uranium) or on multiple layers of hard/...


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Many if not most biochemical reactions in living mater are exquisitely tuned to performing their functions. For example enzymes are capable of assembling and disassembling specific molecules at the atomic level with great efficiency and speed at relatively low temperature. Given suitable external energy sources such enzymes are also capable of pushing ...


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Continuous vapor deposition diamonds use methane, 600 degrees Celsius and about 150 Pa of pressure. It's not impossible to imagine some animal that "cures" its hide in lava flows (700 C). People walk on flows and place sticks through the thin crust presently. Add some creative process to obtain the low pressure. If those things are true, I believe a 10000HV ...


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Good is a relative term, but weapons and armour are relative things anyway. Bone and stone tipped spears are good enough if all your opponent has is bone tipped spears but not if they have bronze. Bronze is good enough if they don't have iron. Iron is good enough if they don't have steel. etc. So how good can bone be? It doesn't matter if that's the best ...


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I think their ability to craft good weapons out of bone-material depends entirely on how fine structured shapes the can produce and how much they can learn from natural bone structures. Bone is not stronger than rock, so solid blunt weapons (like hammers or maces) made from bones will likely never outshine rock counterparts. However, natural bones are ...


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First let's get one thing out of the way. Bone material and density varies a lot from animal to animal, so you can't just pick up a hawk bone and expect it to have the same properties as a dog bone. So what creatures have the best bones? Luckily the animal kingdom is full of creatures with strong bones. Think large and sturdy animals like cows, horses, even ...


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No, Even if the nano particles could retain their magnetic properties, what you would have done is released a bunch of particles that are free to orient themselves and connect with other particles. They would quickly collect into a mass and fall, raining out of the air. The further they had to fall, the larger they would become.


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No, nanoparticles will not retain the magnetic properties of the bulk material, as they will lose their constructive force without being physically locked to the same polarity with regards to each other.


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As long as the creature weighs less than the liquid it displaces, it will float. You can take a material of arbitrarily high density and craft something that will float, so long as you make its volume large enough. Metal ships are made of material that's much denser than water, but they're designed to have a large cavity inside so that they displace a lot of ...


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A simple idea could be some kind of dense mucus or slime, produced by the creature's glands in its "skin" pores - I'm thinking similar to the mucus in human stomach lining, just on the outside... Might be oversimplifying it but in certain habitats it could work (especially if the use of tools is not too extensive; what do you mean by "work"?) About the ...


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