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But how could such a redundant spine work and be good at its job (keeping the dragon's memories intact and heart beating)? Redundancy. The dragon has effectively several "brains" along its spine, and they coordinate much like a human's hemispheres, only better. The spine is actually two spines - the main motoneural/somatic spine and a secondary ...


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Have you considered compromising a bit on what is backed up? If the aim is to make it so that the dragon can survive an instance of going berserk, is memory really that important? Let's scrap the "memory backup" side of things for a second and consider the other options. If all the backups have to do is keep the body alive (and potentially moving ...


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if i were you what i would was make it a bit bulkier with a super thick spine that's hollow with a brain cell stem at the top and then it duplicates its brain piece for piece every-time its injured and drops it down to the bottom of the spine and also give it accelerated healing around the spine base to protect the spare brains and then if its brain is ...


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If I were genetically engineering a fighting dragon and if I were good at my job, I would segment the brain multiple sections, keeping all of the long term memory in the chest behind the best armor. I would then mount smaller centers of consciousness near each of the major sense organs so that each sense had the total attention of a dedicated brain. Those ...


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If the dragon isn't based on typical Earth biology of vertebrates, then it might be more like a nematode worm. Worms that are taught to navigate a maze (or some other simple task they're capable of), can survive extensive brain damage. For instance, if split into two halves, when those regrow into two new worms, each will remember how to perform the task. If ...


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Yes. Biologicaly human brain is not that far from fish brain (birds brain is more evolutionaly "advanced"). So If you put it out of human body and provide it with right chemicals - it still will function down to freezing point (down to 4 degrees at least), but at very low rates of cognition. And will greatly heat up in process. You would need ...


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Yes. Just See https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hypothermia 32-35°C is considered "Mild Hypothermia", described as "Awake and shivering". Symptoms of mild hypothermia may be vague,[15] with sympathetic nervous system excitation (shivering, high blood pressure, fast heart rate, fast respiratory rate, and contraction of blood vessels). These ...


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Psychological science major here (thesis in neuroscience). You're pairing function with structures, but the brain is more complex than that. If cognition is a commodity, then it is the product of a global economy recruiting simpler resources from all over. Just like how an iphone might be misunderstood as being built in the store you purchased it at, it's ...


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