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6

The diseases that we take such efforts over now are inconsequential compared to the death rates from diseases in the past. Untreated, bubonic plague kills upwards of 50%, pneumonic plague kills at 90-95%, septicemic plague kills at 100%. Even an infected cut could kill you due to lack of antibiotics, a rat bite would have a good chance of being lethal. The ...


1

She should focus on one thing, and that should be eliminating smallpox. (*Note, answer depends exactly when the doctor arrived, as it arrived and ravaged europe in the middle ages) It was responsible for the deaths of roughly 10% of the population in the middle ages to the 18th century, and has a very simple vaccine to produce. It's also simple to prove ...


1

You start wearing a clerical collar or habit. Then you take some soap, and you pray over it, where people can see you do this. Really. In the medieval world, nearly everyone believed in God, but the belief was more as a belief in the mystic than a real faith in a living God presiding over an ordered universe. Now you tell them this is special sacred soap ...


1

I really like this question since it presents unique challenges. The question of whether it would be physically possible to practice enough of modern medicine in a medieval setting to be useful has been well addressed in a number of answers. I want to talk about the social difficulties which are far more formidable. The question proposes that she "embark on ...


1

I've looked into this as well, after watching TV shows on 19th century doctors (Bramwell and Dr. Quinn Medicine Woman). One interesting thing is that penicillin can "simply" be grown on bread/fruit and harvested for use. The problem is that the mold that creates penicillin also creates some other items that are toxic/cause allergic reactions. However with ...


1

A person trained for basic first aid is more highly trained that the "doctors" of medieval age. Just knowing what causes infection and how to do basic cleaning of wounds is far more advanced. More people died from disease and infection than actual combat. This was true all the way up to and somewhat including World War 1.


1

Your medic probably has hands-on skills that aren't available otherwise. For instance, even leaving out the improvements she could make in surgical equipment, if she is a surgeon she can make cuts more precise and in the right place than local practicioners could. Even if she's not trained in surgery, her knowledge of anatomy will be far ahead of any local'...


4

You can improve realism by setting realistic minimum healing times This website details approximate healing times for various common sporting injuries, including things like various broken bones, bruises and lacerations. It's not in particularly great detail, but should give you a ballpark. I'm not familiar with the reliability of the website, but where ...


5

As mentioned by several other answers, germ theory and hand-washing is a low-hanging fruit that could yield major improvements in health across whole populations. Boiling drinking water is a good start but hand-washing may feel a bit tricky to implement since in most developed countries we are habituated to washing with soaps etc which in the medieval period ...


3

Depending on how well your medic remembers their college chemistry, they may be able to whip up a few substances that would assist greatly with medical practice. Disinfectant Reasonably pure alcohol shouldn't be that hard to produce; a still can be made entirely of metal, which is useful because medieval glassworking probably isn't up to making the sort of ...


3

I will look at this question from different perspective She has the patronage of a powerful, rich noble, so being accused of witchcraft is not a problem. Unless that noble is a Pope, I find that hard to believe. You seem to heavily dismiss the power of Church in questions of medicine and bodies. Even the most powerful of nobles would have to deal with ...


1

You can't A simple wound may just take a couple of days to heal, without any further consequences. Or it can be infected and you die. Without proper medicine and medication, healing is way more random, so you can't have a reliable cheat sheet.


0

You can't have such a sheet, especially in those times. Today doctors make a prognosis after checking the person, because they need to verify the condition of the injury and the person's fitness. Too many variables to consider for making a realistic sheet. And we are talking about today. In those times a light wound contaminated with tetanus spores could ...


11

Forceps delivery. Your medic will be familiar with obstetric forceps. The success of this dynasty of obstetricians with the Royal family and high nobles was related in part to the use of this "secret" instrument allowing delivery of a live child in difficult cases. In fact, the instrument was kept secret for 150 years by the Chamberlen family, ...


4

The doctor could probably have her biggest effect through two very low tech public health campaigns: (Already mentioned in another answer) Stop bloodletting as a treatment. Encourage rest and fluids instead as standard treatment for undiagnosed illness. Encourage keeping healthy, well-groomed, indoor cats. Cats can carry fleas and the plague, but regular ...


9

There are great many things that modern doctor can help with in medieval times. They can be categorized into several groups: Surgery Even without anesthetics, knowledge of germs and antiseptics can revolutionize surgery. If this doctor is a surgeon, a whole range of operations (like appendectomy) can have a much higher rate of success. Strong spirits and ...


23

The modern doctor's background in chemistry, biology, physics, statistics, methods of scientific inquiry, and the germ theory and pharmacology they are based upon are much more valuable than the patients she can cure alone. She's a one-person University that just advanced many fields by 500 years. A society would gain the greatest benefit by her spending ...


33

There are actually several areas where she can help. Germ Theory. She can educate them about the Germ Theory, and how important it is to disinfect stuff. This is a huge life-saver in many areas, the biggest being wound care, midwifery, and surgery. Getting Rid of the Theory of Humors. One theory of medicine that was particularly popular back in the day was ...


49

Cleanliness This one's a big one. Getting people to just wash their hands and bodies will go a long way, as the medicine of the time was often not helpful at all, if not downright harmful (leeches, for example). In the 14th and 15th century medicine really started to turn around due to the rejection of commonly accepted authorities, and people instead doing ...


9

Even with no equipment a modern doctor would be superb and outstanding. Merely keeping adequate hygiene of his materials (knifes, I assume), administering alcohol on wounds and overall being capable of diagnosticate correctly different illness is enough to be considered the best medic in the century. As for anesthetics, my best educated guess would be opium ...


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