New answers tagged

-1

I can't think of why they might be advantageous, but that doesn't mean your dragons can't have them. There are plenty of evolutionary artifacts that aren't advantageous that we can point to in successful creatures . For instance, humans have a genetic error where we don't create vitamin C, unlike all other primates, meaning we HAVE to have it from our food. ...


1

This isn't exactly the answer you asked for, but I think it may work well for your purposes. You said in a comment that your species is on open, rolling grassland/prairie-like biomes, so there's lots of walking to do. I think it's problematic to envision that this species evolved in these prairies because, evolution-wise, wide open spaces heavily reward ...


0

Recurve fangs make little evolutionary sense. They can't lift animals. I disagree with your assertion that prey is too "slippery" to hook; picture stabbing meat with a fork and lifting it. Given long enough fangs, anything can be "hooked" - but that doesn't mean the dragon's neck is strong enough to lift it! Talons would be better suited for carrying ...


2

Fingers are not present in most arachnids. But they are common in their distant relatives, Crustaceans. Think of your creature as a crab, not a spider. It will walk on rear pairs on legs and use front legs for grabbing. Note that like with all exoskeleton-based arthropods, these fingers will be hard, not soft like in mammals. Scorpions also have "fingers". ...


6

While not a typical trait of arachnids, a way a creature like a spider could grab onto things would to have a type of Raptorial, an appendage similar to a mantis' claws. It could use these as legs to climb or scuttle across the ground while still being able to grip things like handles, pry open certain objects, or grab onto pray. Since they would look like a ...


4

Perhaps a modified form of the chelicerae, the mouth parts. Once humans stopped walking on all fours, our fingers were free to become quite dextrous (course there was also the grabbing branches bit), so I think you are right in thinking that it would be rough for the alien to walk on them. But, perhaps the mouth parts, which are used for manipulating ...


1

The idea of humanoid birds is not impossible considering birds evolved from bipedal Theropod dinosaurs with long arms and grasping hands. Natural selection could definitely have lead to an upright posture in some theropod Dinosaurs which could have allowed them to have a humanoid appearance. However I do not believe that a humanoid anatomy would support ...


1

Tails Tails come in all sorts of shapes and sizes, so each fighter is going to need to figure out what kind of utility they can get from it. If you have decent control over the tail and it's long enough, it can be used for whip-like strikes. You don't need to spin all the way to get more reach with a tail, you could potentially use a punch and then twist ...


2

i have the same opinion regarding using biting unless in grappling/wrestling (this depend on the jaw length too, i imagine it probably awkward to be able to bite for long jaw like crocodile for example if they have humanoid body, but i can see a bite use in defensive or counter attack (still risky like from bad timing and the teeth may get knockoff or end up ...


1

No, because the square-cube problem also affects things like lung capacity. They only have a fraction of the lung surface area they need to get enough oxygen. Similarly, problems with overheating.


4

As any mechanical designer knows, if you want to increase the frequency of an oscillatory motion, you need to reduce the oscillating masses. This is why the hummingbird is to little: with bigger masses in its wings, it could not be capable of flipping them back and forth as it does. Since the bio-mechanics you want to emulate is that one, the only way is ...


2

Bones are fine, but.. Bones account for about 12% of the weight of the human body, and assuming the same would apply to a Kaiju (Which it doesn't have to), for the purposes of weight, it seems like they wouldn't have to generate that much negative weight. A 100t Kaiju, with bones that are in direct -1g, would have bones that are minus 12 tonnes, meaning it ...


3

Imagine a steel beam on a house. It's rigidly held in place (for all intents and purposes it defies gravity). Now try building out from that steel beam using nothing but bacon. Sooner or later you will reach a point where the bacon starts to droop and sag and 'flow' off the beam. Even if you try to build your bacon floor out towards the centre of a square ...


0

Bones ripping out of our favorite big lizard shouldn't be a problem. So long they are not much more on negative weight then would be on positive. Creatures are already well designed to hold to its bones, it would be not much difference if bones are puling up with negative gravity or down with normal.


4

Cremation does what you propose. https://slate.com/news-and-politics/2006/07/i-m-burning-up-how-much-will-my-ashes-weigh.html This estimates 3-5 pounds of ash after cremation. Volatiles leave and carbon leaves as CO2. The ash will mostly be calcium salts and oxides from the bone. Sodium and potassium salts will be present too since that is a major ...


3

Well, your fighting styles are going to be based around the natural weaponry. Normally I go on about making the weapon match the style, but you can't tailor your physiology, you are just born with it. You've listed a variety of natural weapons, and each grouping will influence how the guy fights. Tusks are going to be best used much like a Western style ...


1

Your main problem is that you make a distinction beetween reason how they fight and what they want to achieve. That's human way of fight. Animals are not cocky "Oh I'm so big, I have strenght advantage you cannot harm me". They either have that advantage and will use it, the opponent will notice this and if they decide to fight they don't need to be ...


3

Well a thicker tail can be used to club a foe whereas a prehensile one can be used to trip or grapple. A big enough tail can aid mobility and a weaponized tail will be extremely deadly. However a tail will have a limited degree of movement (assuming it is attached at the base of the spine on their back) and thus depending on length they'll need to turn to ...


2

No All flying animals are warm blooded to some degree. Pterosaurs, birds, and bats are all warm-blooded. Insects are even warm-blooded compared to other arthropods, they are technically cold-blooded on the ground but use their massive wing muscles (which occupy most of their thorax) and to rev up their metabolism before they fly, and are temporarily warm-...


0

Claws should be split off from first knuckles from wrist. They only stick out when fist is made tight. add Abrasive palms, and microscopic suction cup cells to underside of fingers. Finally fingernails are permanently extracted small cat like claws. there you have it!


4

You got humans! No, seriously - think about this. We can eat basically anything on this big, weird world of us with proper preparation. What we can't eat right away, we can find ways to cook and make it edible. We already use stuff like coal, petroleum, and even wood. It is just a matter of time before we start making food directly out of carbon via some ...


19

At the very least, it should be able to break down any organic, energy-storing molecule, ranging from plants and meat to fossil fuels. The closest thing we got on Earth are roaches. They will eat anything that they can chew. Digesting fossil fuels is complicated because of a few factors: Breaking them down within your body could lead to the formation of ...


0

How about having your creature be in fact a multi-combo symbiote? Maybe it's part-way through the evolutionary process of merging into a single complex being (similar to the mix of prokaryotes into eukaryotes, sort of), or maybe it's like the combo-animals of "A Fire In The Deep". Either way, its component creatures 'share' all food sources as appropriate....


5

Heat differential engine. Your creature oxidizes molecules in its "stomach" which is more of a furnace. Anything that can be oxidized is fair game - any reduced carbon, or nitrogen, or metal salt. Oxidation produces heat. The amount of heat produced is controlled by controlling oxygen ingress to the stomach. Under hot conditions, certain metalloproteins ...


12

I would suggest giving it multiple stomachs, like cows, however here each stomach has a different function: one for degrading meats, one for fibrous plants, one for fruits, etc. This would probably require a first stomach with some kind of filtering method, or at least something to break down tough foods, so that each subsequent stomach can fulfill its role ...


0

The problem is not really power. I have a powered "exoskeleton" - AKA Piper Cherokee - that allows me to fly perfectly well. And I could use another sort of exoskeleton - a hang glider - to fly in much the same way that large soaring birds do. No, the real problem is flapping flight, at any scale or power level. To do that reasonably well, you need a ...


0

Possibly But not with current materials nor a fully humanoid shape Consider power and energy requirements for what you intend to do. Then consider the tyranny of the square cube law. To lift a human, jetpacks usually have a power output of about a thousand HP. You can buy a 1,050 HP one at Selfridges & Co if you have half a million pounds to spend (...


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