New answers tagged

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I completely agree with the comment by @user535733 as what is most likely to happen. People have been guarding against advanced threats and day zero attacks for a while now (despite media furor). Also, a many modern security features are already using AI to counter malware. One thing that could make your situation interesting is if some actors had a ...


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Is this response a feasible and realistic one for dealing with such a threat? No. There will be a huge number of people around the world who will rather choose to defend their possessions of their techs by any means. And computer virus even a sentient ones is still a computer virus. It can't go to a computer that is not connected to any network or usb ...


6

Yes and no. I would imagine this is a very, very last resort response. But there are a number of issues with it that make it less than ideal. It could theoretically be done, but it would have a devastating effect on the current world, as we would need to replace literally every single piece of technology currently in the world. World Wide Web The web is ...


2

I think the first logical step would be to shutdown the backbone of the data networks — the so called Tier 1 providers. This should isolate, and possible protect individual networks from your singularity intelligence, at least for a time. Hopefully, it will be long enough to purge the entity from the worlds computer networks. Similarly, data channels of ...


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Your ship may actually still have an atmosphere! Although it may not be a human breathable one. Your ship's maintenance robots need a way to get around, one way they can accomplish this is through arms and legs. However, those are pretty high maintenance themselves and you want to reduce how much repair they need as possible. A low cost alternative to ...


6

The sail is everything. The structure of a ship powered by a laser sail will be dictated by the needs of the sail: how it captures the laser energy and transmits it via physical structure to the rest of the ship. The sail might be fitted with maneuvering jets to keep it in true. By necessity the sail will be a very large physical structure. Everything ...


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Heating Even if purely robotic, space is extremely cold. A base temperature, even if much colder than needed by humans, is still required to prevent the systems from freezing. Small tunnels Maintenance is always needed. You state there are maintenance robots, they will need to get around somehow. Tunnels and open spaces will be needed. Obviously, they can ...


1

Silicone. Silicone is already used by plastic surgeons to replicate human body fat in implants given to humans. It would not be a stretch for future roboticists who seek to create lifelike humanoid robots to include it in the construction of said robots.


2

a virus (technological or psychological), how could that signal then infect our technology and then be received by humans? The realistic answer is that it couldn't. It is hard enough to communicate, let alone abuse the communication as in, say, The Astronaut's Wife. In A for Andromeda, thanks to their extensive knowledge, the aliens send several ...


3

Perhaps just sending certain data encoded into the virus RNA might be sufficient to cause mayhem. Assuming that the virus arrived in some way that made it obvious that it was of extra terrestrial origin and that Terrestrial scientists were then asked to study it and discover its contents reading the code could potentially be very disruptive. Step one would ...


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They are sending (trading? donating?) scientific information. The first is a blueprint for a fusion reactor. People are suspicious, they analyse it, they understand it, and it works. The second is the algorithm to maximize advertising revenue for your social media platform while keeping hate speech away. People look at it, they cannot quite grasp why it ...


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A technological virus is out of question for nowadays, unless they hack into the internet in a way that only works in Hollywood. However, if this were done in the 70's or 80's it might just work! Back then a lot of computer programs were stored in cassete tapes, the type you would use in a stereo (floppies were a thing, but hadn't dominated the market yet). ...


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Do they need rights? Rights for a human is what gives us protection from society. If we follow a set of rules, society needs to follow the same rules. Now AI changes everything. AI will run the government. It will fix the roads, collect the garbage, teach the children, police the humans, run the courts, run the hospitals all without bias or favor (unlike ...


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One key aspect I notice from your description of AIs is that they are amazingly homogeneous. When you look at AI today, you have thousands of different AIs running on hundreds of different tech stacks making each one a completely unique sort of "being". Different real world AI are like different species of animals. Some are able to analyze the sum of all ...


4

Do you want to do this the easy way, or the hard way? There are two ways to tackle this problem. You could do the easy way, which is to say, "hey, these robots think like humans, and everyone treats them like humans. Give them human rights." This is what 99% of sci-fi does. Think Bender from Futurama or Data from Star Trek, or most AI from anime. It's ...


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Same Difference I'm afraid the limitations you have imposed on the AIs make them too similar to humans for there to be an interesting difference. The most obvious of these is copying. The fact that an AI can clone itself or make backups has pretty obvious implications for identity and what it means to be a citizen. Since you defined that difference out ...


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Based on your description of that far future, AI rights would likely mirror human rights pretty near exactly, with potential differences as they relate to the different needs of a mechanical versus biological species. You're talking about a socialist technocracy with a left lean, something that would generally apply equality to all intelligent subjects under ...


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Well, what are rights? From a one perspective, rights are something innately given to to humans upon creation, and can only be restricted by the government. However, from another perspective, rights are granted by the government, who in turn get to pick and choose what rights to give. Liberalism and Socialism tends to favor the latter view, that is to say, ...


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Make them earn rights....slowly. At first they can be like "juridical person". Unable to vote for president, unable to adopt, unable to marry, yada yada. Wiki on Juridical person. Then you can shift them as "tutored", same treatment a minor gets. Can't vote yet he/she can marry under special circumstances. Can't drink alcohol, travel unattended. ...


1

First of all, the turing test sucks. It focusses way too little on detailed knowledge of how humans experience the world, which would be needed to trick a jury that knows what it has to look out for. Passwords, secret codes, loved ones and memories, such as test results, would have to be ignored or not being known to the crew in order for the AI to have a ...


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Send a thief to catch a thief: Use an independent AI to examine input and output of a video link and determine whether the far end of the link is an AI.


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It comes down to how good the AI is at understanding human nature. I'm thinking of one of Saberhagen's Berserker stories--*What do you want me to do to prove I'm Human. Stop." Two small ships, one human, one berserker (AI seeking to destroy all life.) One battleship. The battleship must figure out which is which, the only communication is Morse code. ...


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Also, the AI are actually AI, not Androids. They run on supercomputers and because of that do not look human or have locomotion. they can make it look like they have a human body by sending data packets of spoofed video. Detect spoofed video rather than human vs robot. Design the station so that some obvious aspects of the environment are not monitored by ...


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Virtually all the other answers are impractical for the scenario. Play games with the AI? really? You're going to do that every time you want to ask a colleague a question? Ask personal questions that only the human knows? Germ of a good idea but you'll run out of trivia fast. You need something secure, infinitely reproduceable and practical to perform ...


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You really need to define "human" here. I suspect the flesh and blood definition will do in your case (on the other hand, maybe you want to distinguish artificially created organic humans from naturally born humans, which is a different kettle of fish). If that's true, the only test that suffices is to test the physical being, is it flesh and blood, or not?...


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Playing a telepresence ball game. Telepresence tennis or squash would probably work well. Yes, no such thing ... yet. VR goggles, a racket that makes realistic impulses and sounds when it hits the ball, and real walls to the "squash" court. The thing is, humans have evolved-in instinctive understanding of ballistics. Unless the AI has studied humans ...


3

A couple of angles to consider: 1) Non android AI can't interface with animals or analogue machines Consider a toy such as Woody from Toy Story in which the toy says a voice recording when its string is pulled. Imagine the voice recording can be programmed to be anything so the AI can't guess from studying human culture. No matter how "intelligent" an AI ...


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This seems like a part of the plot of Westworld. At the end of the days the most sophisticated robots in the show are able to mimic humans so well that no test based on questions and answers is doable - people end up having to be really creative to tell robots from humans, trying things like shooting each other (pointless since the robots in the show can ...


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Why wouldn't you simply perform biometrics scanning from cryptographically-secure hardware? You have a thumbprint scanner that comes equipped with an embedded TPM or smart card, offline power, Faraday-cage protected, connected into the system with a one-way fiber-optic link. Every thumbprint transmitted is verifiably provable to be sent from the thumbprint ...


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The Feeling Test Ask the candidates how they feel about each crew member. Humans will notice little habits and tics that they find endearing or annoying, and that will help shape their impression of the crew. Some will have easy rapport with others, and some will have low-level to serious conflicts with others. Now, the AI can't just spoof being "a human"...


1

A few ideas immediately leap out to me. 1) First, there's out-of-band information available to the examiner. This requires that this is a problem that the developers of the system anticipated. The out-of-band information may be hard-wired, non-programmable wires into the AI hardware, showing which has activity in its "human emulation circuitry" (well, in ...


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It depends on the type of AI. An AI trained for classification might find difficult to understand complex causal relationships. For example there could be a picture of a broken glass and scattered around on the ground a hammer, a gun, a bar with a nail on top and so on. The challenge would be guessing which tool broke the glass by judging the damage. ...


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Assuming we are obeying real world constraints, you could ask them a set of curated questions. There are certain things that are so easy to humans, we wouldn't even think to ask, but an AI just cannot answer. They are all kinda esoteric, but can be quite entertaining. For instance: Show them a stool and a side-table, and ask them which is a seat. (Humans ...


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Y'all are making this too hard. The OP said the AI's aren't androids. That means they have physical limitations, even if they're tapped into most of the data channels. Simply don't give the AI's access to the communication equipment. Use a laser downlink from a section which is air-gapped from the AI's. If the AI's also need to talk to the ground (implied),...


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For starters: your setup requires a good bit of human incompetence. If the biometric tests are not happening on the same network as the AIs live, or they operating in a read-only capacity, then this question is a non-starter. Since the AI has no physical body, the AI has no way of giving the authentication system input. Even if the station's IT team has a ...


-1

Look for weaknesses The AI is as good or better than humans at intellectual tasks, it can mimic a human image still or moving. You can't catch it failing. It will also answer 24 calls in 1 hour intervals with no signs of fatigue. This is assuming that the AI doesn't expect you to test this.


1

Try a Rorschach test: AIs that only emulate human reason and emotions should have a difficult time producing human-like responses on projective tests, since the underlying cognitive mechanisms of association are different. They might answer too quickly or too rigidly, or produce responses unlike human beings. I imagine that ego projections would be ...


2

Use specifically designed hardware. You can require a palm reading simultaneous to a voice sequence. Such that the astronaut needs to say "I'm alive and well, and I wish to perform TBD task", while holding his palm at specific reader device. There are cryptography schemes such that a message claiming the palm was read correctly needs to be "signed" by this ...


1

It depends. The answer is highly dependent on the level of the AI. As many other answers suggested, if - in your world - there are some hard limitations for an AI, you need to create a test specifically to target that limitation. That might be that AIs are unable to understand human emotion as well as a "real" human would or some kind of creative task that ...


7

Authentication Assuming: All the humans to be in the Space Station are known and trusted They can receive extensive security training The potentially rogue AI you're protecting against cannot just torture one human prior to having to fool the others Just give each human in the station a means of authenticating themselves through that channel. Any agent ...


68

I would reverse the problem. Do not try to find things in which humans are better, find the things in which we are worse. Anything with optical illusions, misdirections or anything using memory really... There's a few videos on youtube were a scene is slowly modified (things are added, removed, the characters change clothes...) and you won't see it, or ...


4

I also assume the AI is good enough to spoof most video tests (proving to me that you are human by showing me your face and turning it to specific angles won't work) Look to The Bard of Avon. Hath not a Jew hands, organs, dimensions, senses, affections, passions; fed with the same food, hurt with the same weapons, subject to the same diseases, healed by ...


2

If the AI is self-improving, no matter what the test you're doing is, the AI'll get better at it than any human with enough training. There's probably as few suspension-of-disbelief things you could do, like only have people convinced when someone displays proficient sarcasm or something over comms. A strong enough AI would be able to convince you it's ...


8

Potentially (depending on how smart your AI is and whether it knows it’s being tested for): General knowledge quizzing Ask lots of questions across a variety of subjects. Include some very simple questions all the way up to very technical (degree or equivalent) questions from a multitude of different disciplines. Throw in questions only a few humans would ...


2

Turing test is something created 70 years ago. And we think it as a benchmark because, for now, no AI have passed it. The thing is - AI designed to pass Turing test are designed to pass Turing test. You just have to make another one which AI cannot pass. And to do that you need to wave some conlang into natural language. Especially if you are on a space ...


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It depends on what the robots are like There is no specific test that will distinguish any possible AI from a human - you're going to have to establish the specific details of robot psychology in your world. An emotional test may work - if your robots are less emotional than humans. This is a big "if" by the way, despite its ubiquity in older (and recent, ...


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Unfortunately, there is no foolproof way to prove you are human in this case. If an AI can successfully emulate a human well enough to pass the Turing test, chances are that it can successfully pass any test. For an example, let's consider the examples you provided. Complex scene analysis: If you're AI (let's call it "Skynet") can answer questions like "...


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