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What if robots are actually indistinguishable from humans in every sense by then? They have cognitive processes, they have sentience (subjective experiences), they have emotions, they are self-aware. At this point our definition and general perception of what a robot is would be not too different from what a human is. The only difference might be something ...


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I want to say No. From the setting you're describing, the robots are only imitating humans. They are very good imitations and from the outside there is no way to tell the difference. But from the inside ? Carsogrin talk about it a bit in his answer, but "Cogito ergo sum". Even now, in a world where everyone is human (or so it seems ?), most people ...


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Yes, because all these things work the other way round. The limits of the "humanity" are pretty much artificial. The society may treat as a "human" only the members of the tribe, only the males, only the adults, only the citizens, only the free men, only the followers of a particular religion, etc, etc... Human beings not included in the &...


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p.s. The core question is that of whether or not you are okay with a rather dark account of how the human beings are persuaded to behave as robots. ———— I think I am not unusual in being aware that I am self-aware, and knowing that there are serious issues around making a machine that is (genuinely!) self-aware. (It is (trivially?) easy to get a robot to ...


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Yes, people could be fully convinced of such things Most people usually are reasonable and believe true things, but that's not universal and exceptions are quite plausible. Of course, someone who's strongly convinced of something false would be generally considered delusional, but delusions, including unusual delusions, are not that rare. A particular ...


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Yes, and it already happens, you see mental illnesses are messy things and can cause your brain to act differently than usual. Of course that's a bit different than what you want, or you could just get those people with those illnesses and use them to make the job easier. in short yes, and some people already do think they are robots due to mental issues.


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Yes. As long as the question is "Can a person be brainwashed sufficiently to switch their own identity" then the answer is yes. It won't work reliably in 100% of cases, or may require a long time to work, but at least some fraction of subjects will be successfully convinced that they are, in fact, robots. However, this will work only if this ...


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Yes Simple answer is yes. People have an image of themselves. This image changes over time and the idea of being human fits into this. But there are plenty of irregular personal views that go along with it. Some are harmless, some are just strange and some turn the world upside down. There is a person who is convinced she's a cat and tries to become one as ...


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Machine learning. Specifically unsupervised cluster recognition algorithms, of which there are many designed to perform various subtly different tasks in ways that all boil down to the sane fundamental goal: Take a collection of data points with a variety of variables. Using nothing but these data, discern good boundaries for separating datapoints into ...


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You explain in comments that you want to stay away from the religious perspective and focus on the social aspect But, as The Bard once intoned... "A rose by any other name..." The short version of the answer: Humanity has been trying to determine a way to objectively prove the existence of one or more higher life forms (HLFs) from the advent of ...


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Dose them on painkillers, or they’ll end up broken and unusable. I’m not a psychologist, but I think PTSD is caused by pain, stress, etc. So repeated exposure to this through death and regeneration will not make them storer, but traumatise them. Instead, dose them on painkillers. Now they experience death, but it doesn’t hurt. The first few times they’ll ...


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If you want to make people insensitive to technology addiction, you probably need to break the reward loop that you mention, and thus make people insensitive to the molecules triggering that mechanism, modifying the steric configuration of either the receptors or the molecules. The problem with this approach is that the reward mechanism is a key element for ...


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Unlike computer flash storage, memories aren't just "files" but rather physical arrangements of neurons and connections in the brain. When you learn something, new neurons are formed, retrained, or connect themselves differently. This means if you "copy" a brain neuron-by-neuron, the copy will have the same memories, personality, etc. ...


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Repeated exposure to pain might decrease pain tolerance instead of increasing it. Pain tolerance has two major aspects: pain receptors' sensitivity, and perception of pain. Repeated exposure to pain may make pain receptors more sensitive to stimuli and lower pain threshold and tolerance. The more you poke someone the more painful it becomes. Perception of ...


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Special forces training and controlling the pain In all special forces trainings pain is part of the training. However, the Spetsnaz Russian special forces are famous for it. Being hit with wooden sticks, concrete blocks broken on their heads by sledge hammers and being dragged behind trucks are just the most ibvious. They are starved, undercooled, ...


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Traumatising your soldiers will make them weaker Your soldiers will remember the suffering and the powerlessness of their deaths. Combine this with a cultural expectation of macho-ness and not expressing emotion, and you've basically created an army of PTSD suffers. They will get into battle and go into an automatic mode. That may include freezing, fleeing, ...


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The same as a regular human with an artificial heart You have a basic problem that blood flow is essential for every part of the body to operate. It's certainly possible to micromanage the conditions to let parts of the body survive without blood flow (that's how we manage transplants, after all), but it's hard to do and it isn't a long-term solution. Any ...


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