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1

Scaling a humanoid up to 24 feet is very possible, even if evolutionarily unlikely. The main issues that have to be dealt with are muscle strength and the cardiovascular system. Most of the other functions either scale correctly with size, or can afford to take a small hit in efficiency. Bones: every time height doubles, the bones have to take twice as much ...


0

most likely, it'll be essentially an elephant-looking ape, but with no trunk and maybe a longer neck You see, the main problem here is that, when compared to dinosaurs, their hollow but strong bones and airsack systems, mammals tend to have bigger problems growing. Yes, African elephants can get bigger than what you asked, and that comes at the price of ...


2

In Earthly ecologies, ecological niches are fiercely contested. In areas where wolves have been re introduced, the wolves have driven off the coyotes who had occupied the vacant niche. Similar things can be seen with the introduction of invasive species, if the "new" species has some competitive advantage over the existing species, they will overrun the ...


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They Must Live Entirely Separated or Have a Different Niche The Principle of Competitive Exclusion puts the kibosh on any humanoids living in harmony together if they share the same niche. Homo Sapiens drove Neanderthals and Desinovians to extinction within a relatively short time period after we first encountered them, and this is because competitive ...


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Niche environments and more migration: Based on how migrations of humans have happened, I would say the prime real estate would undergo a lot of shifting as different species and sub-species vied for control of territory. On Earth, most parts of the World have seen many ethnicities push each other around or absorb the other groups after conquering them. ...


3

Well, we already know the disastrous end the Neanderthals met here on Earth. Sapiens moved in and either shagged or outcompeted them into extinction. I think it would be fair to say that, at the very least, if Sapiens is involved in your world, they'll just do the same. I think if the creation a/o evolutionary tracks of the various kindreds are a little ...


4

About 98 feet, give or take Obviously, there would need to be a few changes to survive in the water, though I will keep to your requirement of 'partially human in shape'. Completely human is fully impractical, and I will stick to the requirement of 'realistically evolve on Earth'. Alright, let's start. The first thing we do is make a few adjustments to the ...


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Possibly. Trees grow flowers and fruits, so if somehow the tree was altered where the instead of flowers and fruit, it grew embryos and had a sac to hold them until they matured.


3

Most parasitic or symbiotic lifeforms work this way: the host provides resources for the lifeforms to grow an reproduce. Mistletoe is a simple example of nutrient extraction of the host tree. On a more impressive scale, Toxoplasma make infected mice and rats behave in ways that make them easy prey for cats – the later being the hosts where Toxoplasma will ...


1

Strike them with your enormous genitals. https://www.dailymotion.com/video/xlft8n It is not an original idea but still one I think we do not see enough. Depicted: a battle in the movie Pom Poko where the raccoon dog heroes battle the police, using their own scrotums as weapons (also parachutes). The people in your world could do the same. Persons in ...


3

Well it depends on the structure of their hands a bit and how tough their skin is versus the sharpness and length of their claws. Punching is only off the table if they drive their own claws into their hands. If the claws are too long though they wouldn't be able to bend their fingers enough to fully clench their fist. Instead their fingers would be laid ...


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palm strikes With a palm strike, not only you're keeping your fingers away from both you and (ideally) from your enemy, it is a great move in street fights and is considered by some to be actually better to execute than a punch, regarding overall damage to the opponent and to yourself. This will likely explain better how each one works, as well as ...


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Karate Chop With the knuckle at the base of the pinky finger used as the bludgeoning point, and the hand kept flat and rigid, they could use a karate chop to achieve something vaguely similar. It's the knuckles that matter When fighting bare-handed the thing that does the most damage in a punch (besides the force) is the fact that the force is behind your ...


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This hand arrangement could evolve from an intelligent creature whose hands had 2 fingers and a thumb that develop on the ulnar side. Then, a mutation might give the species an advantage over other species, but also causes ulnar dimelia.


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