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This site is filled with "if tech X is transported to time Y..." type questions. Most of it is insensible. So, as a frame challenge, I give you two answers that are both right. Answer #1: They would affect every war past, present, and near future If the people who possess them have access to a (practically) infinite supply of bullets & pistols, ...


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Those pistols are still relevant in modern warfare. In a very balanced modern conflict, having a good pistol as your secondary weapon can change the tide. Not with a decisive moment, but by the accumulation of small scale events where a reliable pistol can save the day. In ancient time, you should not underestimate the power of modern handgun. The fire rate ...


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U.S. Revolution War because you can't outgun artillery, or cannon ball ships with P320. I know muskets were inaccurate, even if 100 m was their effective range. US Civil War because you can't outgun rifles, sharpshooters or snipers with P320. You don't outgun artillery. You make the artillery uselless. By not giving them a target. You don't give them a ...


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If you can manufacture modern semiautomatic pistols, you can also manufacture semiautomatic rifles. Or automatic rifles. Or machine guns. You don't get the ability to make one without the other. For that matter, there are conversion kits to add a stock to a pistol, adding a great deal of accuracy. Handguns are more limited by short sights and the inability ...


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Actually I'd say anything before WWI. So here is an answer based on the little I know of strategy and warfare and also looking at the weapons themselves. You said they won't impact the American civil war? Well. Let's examine that. Wikipedia says that the most widely used rifle was the Springfield Model 1861 that has this joke of a rate of fire Rate: User ...


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"The musket is a good handle for the bayonet" You have a lot of faith in the accuracy of Revolutionary War muskets. Here's a great article explaining why they were so inaccurate: https://allthingsliberty.com/2013/07/the-inaccuracy-of-muskets/ I would much rather have a reliable pistol with modern sights than a Revolution era musket. I think a ...


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Pistols generally have an effective range of ~50m against a single target. If your opponent is using shoulder-to-shoulder massed-infantry tactics like was seen in the late 1700s and early 1800s, then your likelihood that you will hit a useful target goes up dramatically at longer ranges. A unit of men all carrying modern semi-autos are going to decimate a ...


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This is not a line ship designed to go toe to toe with major naval assets. It's a patrol boat designed to bring force to control civilian shipping. This boat can badly damage most modern civilian freighter and passenger ships. You would not want to be on the receiving end of this thing if the Commander decides to light up your bridge with its weapons. Ships ...


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It would be decisive in any (non-landlocked) war prior to 1860/1870 (and quite a few after that). 1859 is when ironclads were first used, and they became all-steel from about 1870. Even with the modern armaments of your patrol boat, I expect a group of them would pose a significant-enough challenge to reduce the impact of its existence. It would still ...


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It could alter the course of history beyond all recognition. Think about the battle of Salamis, in the year 480 before the common era. The Persians had already occupied northern and central Greece, the Athenians had evacuated their city, leaving the empty shell to be occupied by the enemy. The alliance of Greek city-states had agreed to the plan of ...


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I answered this when they question was still a Japanese missile boat. But the editing shows what I consider the main misconception underlying the question. Think People, Knowledge, Politics Assume that the time travelers decide to support a local government and that they can convince the locals to trust them and to take them seriously to start with. For the ...


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Think all the way back: [At the time I answered this question, it was referring to a Japanese patrol boat (the question was modified), and the answer is reflected as such] The biggest impacts on battles this ship can make will be in shifting major historical events. Imagine a group of Japanese who wanted to change the entire course of history for Japan. How ...


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Massive Difference (but not how you would expect it) Forget firepower. The difference is computing power. Code breaking suddenly leaps ahead decades so German codes are virtually worthless. Your codes suddenly go to 256 bit encryption and impossible to break. This is just the tip of the iceberg. The real difference is the technology contained in the ship, ...


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Launch from international waters. The main obstacle to launching Orion Drive spacecraft is a political one, the result of nations deciding against the use of nuclear explosions for peaceful purposes lest they accidentally start a nuclear war, and writing treaties with other banning their use. As a result, if you wanted to launch Orion Drive nuclear pulse ...


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A multitude of actual answers were developed during the period when ORION nuclear pulse drive were being actively investigated, but references are scattered all over the place, making it difficult to encapsulate this. Some of the best sources of information are through the Atomic Rockets website and the "Unwanted Blog", who's author is a big fan. A ...


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The Earth is dying: One possible scenario is that some vast catastrophe has or will soon devastate the future capacity of the Earth to sustain human life. In such a situation, getting MASSIVE amounts of stuff into space as quickly as possible, regardless of the consequences, would become the overarching concern. Say, for example, an asteroid was headed to ...


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Project Orion never came to fruition for multiple reasons, chiefly among them that there was no purpose for it. Remember, the space race, Moon landing, etc. didn't happen because people were totally pumped about space exploration or because scientists wanted to fulfill their curiosity, or even because people wanted to colonize other worlds; it all happened ...


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A 2012 study in the Journal of Propulsion and Power directly addresses your question: "[Project Orion's] feasibility was never dismissed on purely technical grounds. In fact, many of the scientists and engineers who came into contact with the program over its seven-year lifetime became convinced of its viability. The political and nontechnical issues ...


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Another less scientific one: The fountain of eternal youth / death Depending on how you see it… There is a jellyfish, that alternately ages foreward and backward, making it practically immortal (Turritopsis dohrnii). Let’s add a deadly botox-like venom to the creature and you not only get a reason for the desert people to have a long tradition of worshipping ...


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Fun Juice found/produced in the desert Deserts are great places to grow cacti[citation needed]. They are THE kind of plant you think of when you think desert plant. It turns out that some kinds of cacti (peyote, St. Peter, peruvian torch and others) produce a chemical called mescaline. It doesn't matter who they are, where they're from, what they did... ...


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Less scientific, crazy idea, based on deadly endemic cave species and Seallussus' idea of a tolerance the locals have built over years against the poisenous atmosphere: It's a high-security bank vault The locals (in that case a tribe of 200 to 300 people but with a steady population) are not interested in money or the value of “dead” materials (gold and ...


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The town is an exile / hideout / prison / isolation for one important person (the river and trade route might be a little unfavourable for a prison) Maybe the prisoner was the leader of a riot against the king or a fanatic cult. Or even guilty of war crimes while helping the actual king claiming his throne. And after a life of intrigues and battles this ...


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Endemic species There are endemic species that only evolved on one island or in one cave after being cut off from the rest of the world... let's assume the super narrow vertical hole leads to a cave deep below the desert, the only place where a rare species (animal, herb, fungus) lives which is either the caviar of your world or something you can extract a ...


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"The kingdom is pretty dependent upon this resource." - that could be anything, If it's either world-beating quality (the world's best mirrors/porcellain/wine) or unique (the dutch East-India Company was the only supplier for nutmeg for some time because it only grew on one island) it might grow into an essential part of that countrie's economy. A ...


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Meteoric Iron Ancient civilizations called Meteoric Iron many different things: star metal, metal from heaven, fire from heaven, lightning iron, etc. but one things is true across the whole ancient world. They all attributed mystical or divine properties to this natural alloy making it by far one of the most rare and valuable substances in the ancient world....


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