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A pandemic is caused by the spread of an extremely contagious virus, likely either airborne or droplet-borne. On top of that, you need a lot of international travel and either ignorance, apathy, incompetence, or malice from governments and other organizations for the virus to travel across borders. The problem here is this requirement: Should kill most of ...


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tPA, special delivery tPA is given to break up clots, as in myocardial infarction; but it can cause hemorrhage. Reteplase is a brand name of tPA that is 357 AA long, so it takes about 3x357 = 1071 nucleotides to code it. COVID-19 has about 30000 nucleotides in its genome. Now, I've been trying to cut down on the number of doomsday weapons I come up with a ...


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That depends on if you want hemophilia to be the only symptom. A virus that selectively attacks megakaryocytes would cause this, as it would prevent platelets from being formed, and would cause pretty much no other symptoms. If other symptoms are ok, any major damage to the liver can cause it too, as it would prevent clotting factors used by platelets from ...


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This is certainly feasible, there are both bacterial and non-bacterial diseases that can essentially cause or lead to coagulopathy. There are specific infections which can affect hemostasis, I strongly suggest researching exactly how you want it to go down, essentially. Typically coagulopathy will present as one of many symptoms, or may be symptom of a ...


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We already do have such viruses ("transposable elements" or "transposons" is the more correct term). They cause "interspersed repeats" - near identical sequences, copies of themselves, spam essentially, to be deposited throughout the human genome over the generations. If the spam lands in an important gene, a child is removed ...


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Yes And No As L.Dutch pointed out, retroviruses routinely insert their RNA into the DNA of the host cell. If such a virus were carefully engineered, and targeted germ cells (sperm and eggs), it could introduce some scattershot mutations that could result in much more rapid evolution in the progeny of the people infected by the virus. (And result in a lot ...


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Evolving is probably not the best word to use here. Evolution is a process involving the way species change over time in order to fit into the environment they live in. A virus can force a population to evolve over generations, but not an individual over their lifetime. Other than that you may consider reading bout gene therapy: Gene therapy (also called ...


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I think it has already happened. Some years ago I read in a scientific magazine that in our DNA were found traces of viral genome which were integrated in it a long time ago. Keep in mind that the difference between a symbiotic and a parasite organism can be very thin, and if the piece of code inserted by the virus doesn't mess too much with the host but ...


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