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From a simple economic perspective, the laws of supply and demand would work to decrease the cost of weaponry. Since there will be a great demand for monster killing weaponry, suppliers will boost output to service the demand, other suppliers will enter the market and a host of other goods and services related to monster killing will also appear (everything ...


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First, the obvious caveat to what I'm about to say is that the price needs to be whatever it has to be to keep the game balanced. But from a worldbuilding perspective, the price of anti-monster guns depend on just how frequently monsters attack. I say "anti-monster guns" because guns in general are good for more than just shooting monsters, and so their ...


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The price of the weaponry would depend on the severity of the most common, or most prevalent, threat. What I mean by this is that if you can take out most threats with a relatively low-powered firearm, the need for more powerful firearms is reduced. There is no need to use a 50.cal sniper to kill a common goblin you could kill just as easily with a 9mm ...


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So, slightly unhelpful answer: they'll cost enough to keep your game balanced. More practical answer: economies of scale will make things cheaper and easier to come by, though do be aware of tropes like Adam Smith Hates Your Guts or No Hero Discount. As far as killing monsters goes everyone is going to be happier when there are more people available and ...


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If the technological level allows, they're probably slightly cheaper, but much easier available. Most first world countries have hurdles to stop wide-spread gun control - from blacklisting like the USA to whitelisting like most of Europe. In your world, wide-spread gun ownership will be required because everyone need to be able to defend themselves. ...


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According to median IPCC models barely noticeable difference for a random observer: plus 2-3 C (most of the increase during nights, winters and near poles) less than meter higher ocean level clearly more heat waves, with other extreme climate events the models are unclear, but they are likely If for story reasons you need some doom, then I suggest picking ...


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This is not my expertise, but I used to be climate skeptic as a teenager(yeah, I know, I'm sorry, I was a teenager, ok? kek), who later actually sat down and read a bit about it, so I'll tell you what I understood. Climate change is actually much slower of an extintion effect than most media and activists would have you believe. From what I've learned, it's ...


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Regardless of whether the new algorithm is practical, the mathematician collects $1,000,000 from the Clay Mathematics Institute for solving one of their Millennium Problems. Any consequences beyond that, including but not limited to effect on encryption, depends on whether the solution is practical. An algorithm could take a minimum of a million years to ...


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Contrary to popular belief, not all encryption becomes completely useless. It just gets a whole lot harder. How big of a deal this is depends on the constant factors associated with the algorithmic reduction. Reliable encryption depends on having a trapdoor function which is unfeasible to break in a "reasonable" amount of time. Choosing a trapdoor function ...


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each molecule will also explode [..] if exposed to a temperature of 500 K for too long. The only places on Earth where temperature exceeds 500 K are either lava flows from a volcanic eruption, wildfires or furnaces. nine anomalous masses, ranging in size from exactly two molecules to half an eyelash Statistically speaking, scattering at random 9 sample ...


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