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I could think of a few. Contested lands. Something like a large country/continent with just too much trouble for it to be of any use to the big countries. So merc and bounty hunters thrive in those areas as they provide a useful service to the people. These areas could also suffer as a buffer zone which is actually realistic. Think of something like a ...


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A world where government is weak is likely to be one where mercenaries and bounty hunters will thrive. If a government cannot enforce its authority or wage war through its own military power, then it will be forced to rely on hired help to do so. That's where your mercenaries come in. Mercenaries are actually quite active in the real world. But they tend to ...


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Teach no genetically engineer (uplift), then teach, yes. but uplifting a species is still way beyond our ability you would need severely advanced genetic engineering, likely generations away. Our first uplift will also be a more intelligent species likely an ape (although we could drive the rest of apes extinct before we get there), lastly our first ...


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We are still at the stage that we don't know most of the molecular mechanism that how our body works. Even one day we know that, we still don't know how brain-to-mind works. So we can never be sure whether we can train monkey (or any specie that have a complex enough brain) to do advanced human things. Without theory support, the only thing we can do is to ...


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You can train apes to do human jobs, but I doubt it would be worth the trouble. Apes can understand the concept of work and payment, but their ability to grasp complex tasks is, on average, much lower than that of humans. They can also be moody, prone to distraction, and have their own personality traits that differ significantly from those of typical ...


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japan do that and most south east asian country also train monkey for certain activity, from picking coconut or other fruit to street circuss to act like human like riding bicycle,smoking, even as drug cartel, etc. i dont know about japan but the training that i know though..... is pretty much would make animal lovers like PETA mad because it choke the ...


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You can do whatever you want in the fictional world but you need to understand that they will not be monkeys in the way we know them in this reality. They have no sense of value in anything beyond basic family or troop relationships, so “money” means nothing to them. Damaging property, stealing, giving things away, will never be concepts true monkeys can ...


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Not without majorly altering the monkeys to the point where they aren't monkeys anymore and its a new subspecies. They aren't smart enough. The expression 'Monkey see, monkey do' comes to mind - they can be trained, yes. They can be trained to do things. But there's no way for them to go 'Planet of the Apes' on us. Thankfully.


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I think the problem lies in the understanding of science. First, not having evidence about magic does NOT mean that magic does not exist. It only means that we have NOT found evidence about it. If you use that previous logic, then before we discovered the laws of gravity it, the laws or even gravity, did not exist! Let me give you a simple example. So ...


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Maybe we've already found magic, but we just called it science instead. Your 1 in million tries would be assumed to be an error, an outlier, a problem with the scientific setup or computer glitch that should be ignored. But if you can repeat the process and it is actually usuable you can create laws for it. As an example of this happening is when a science ...


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