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If they have the skills to pass the checks to build the ship and leave let them. Then give them a monster, then tsunami, ect otherwise they don't leave the island because either it moves because it's ontop of an animal making the land they came from further and further away from them so they can't sail there with whatever supplies they can muster. Or else ...


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It would not, in general, be realistic, because there are plenty of horses in New Orleans and the surrounding areas today. Importing them would only make sense in two cases: 1) Something in the apocalypse caused the local horses to die out or become sterile. Perhaps due to a disease like malaria, whose vector (a mosquito) can't survive cold northern ...


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If people do need something, they move heaven and earth for it. So people, somehow, using horses for transportation is fine. However the real question is does it make sense? A post apocalyptic setting would mean a couple of things. For starter cities are a lot smaller with a situation similar to medieval, particularly medieval, cities. As people can't ...


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Instead of using the power of humans, passively use the power of the O'Neill Cylinder itself. At least, use an inevitable feature of the O'Neill Cylinder design: Wind. Instead of horse drawn wagons, you'd have sailing wagons barrelling down your dusty dirt roads. Most of the daily traffic would go with the wind, anti-spinward, but it doesn't take much to ...


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Import the horses From your question: but would it make sense for traders from the North to breed horses and bring them to the South to sell? Yes, it would make total sense! Horses originally came to North America from Europe, not land migration. So, historically, their movement and sprawl is greatly affected by humans who raise them. Going further ...


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Since the cylinder has artificial gravity, there is one "human powered" transportation method that uses the variable gravity of the cylinder. The person simply climbs to the spin axis, either at the end cap, or raised platforms spaced along the cylinder, and then while in the zero g zone, aims along the spin axis and pushes off as hard as possible. They ...


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A climbing rope mechanism, if it's a cylinder then you tie both ends to and have a crank like mechanism that when rotated have a platform climb up the rope, seeing how a straight line is the shortest distance between two point you will reach the other end faster then walking around the cylinder & as a bonus you don't waste ground space that can be used ...


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Hamster balls the size of humans! They can also traverse water! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tg7i30pXARQ And be bouncy enough for the jumping trick! And, if pressurized, could be used for the occasional EVA! Every family needs one! Or several!


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If you are looking for something human powered, practical, suitably futuristic and still mostly unknown, look no further than the Shweeb: . Using a network of multi-level rails and remote-controlled switches, trunk lines and branches can be built to achieve any density you require. The low weight of the rails and the pods lend themselves really well for ...


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I bet, at childhood you did a trick with a balloon: first inflate it, then release it :) So it hops over the room loosing the air pressure inside until deflated. So why we can't create such a transportation method? You sit on a chair with, let say, small wings and attached balloon. Prerequisite: the balloon is inflated. Once opening a vent, you start moving ...


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A unique mode of transport that would only work in an O'Niell cylinder would be a giant swing, suspended from an axle in the middle. Grab the swing, run as fast as you can, take your feet off the ground and you'll continue to move until air resistance slows you down. The obvious draw-backs are that it only works for travel around the circumference (east and ...


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For some reason, everyone seems to forget exactly what an O'Neill cylinder actually is. It's a spinning tube, that uses the fact that it must apply a force to you to accelerate you in a circle; this force is what simulates gravity. The cylinder can only apply artificial gravity if you're in contact with it... If you're not touching it, then you'll be ...


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Horses were actually really quite good at what they did. We abandoned horses as a method of transit mostly because they weren't as fast and their effective operational range (for a reasonable timescale) was therefor generally quite a bit lower. Additionally, there are space/infrastructure concerns that scale poorly as a function of population density - ...


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(Not quite sure on the physics here.) I think if you have a river that loops around the habitat, it will end up with a constant flow, because the water has inertia and will act against the movement of the station. You can then get in a boat to travel antispinward (I think?) without needing to row. (This is basically the conveyor belt answer, but water is ...


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I think you have some basic misconceptions about what "fuel-free" should mean (food is fuel! etc.), but the question is an interesting one. If your goal is to allow transportation without needing large portable energy supplies that would be unsafe or impractical, human-powered transportation is an option, but will significantly impact nutritional needs for ...


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SIMPLE ANSWER...... A BICYCLE. VARIANT ANSWER...... A Recumbent Bicycle. Note. Water on many alien worlds is as hard as iron because it is frozen and you said 'by land' and 'by water'.


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Leverage the angular momentum of the O'Neill cylinder, itself. When one is standing on the surface of such a cylinder and drops his ice tea, it is not his own feet that get the bath, but the person next to him. In fact, the dropped beverage (aside from being a travesty in lost deliciousness) is attempting to move in a straight line while the person who ...


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If we don't count food as fuel, how about plain old wings? Climb far enough up one of the end walls, and the gravity gets low enough for people to fly on their own muscle power (potentially aided by thermal convection). Don't worry about the air getting too thin; with the gravity dropping off, there'll be breathable air all the way to the center of any ...


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Parabolic Tunnels There has been some research into the idea of a tunnel in the shape of a parabola underground, where the momentum the vehicle gains dropping to the bottom of the tunnel is enough (or nearly so) to get it back up to the top on the other side of the parabola. You'd have to deal with friction, of course, so some sort of maglev would be ...


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You could have a pedaled aircraft (such as used to cross the English Channel). The more you pedal it up in the air, the less the 'gravity' will be, so you mainly have to expend energy when taking off. A small pedal-powered airship could also be useful. You wouldn't need as much energy to get it up as a heavier-than-air aircraft, and it will quickly reach an ...


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Being sensible (alas!). The most obvious form of non-powered transportation inside an O'Neill cylinder would be the bicycle. It's non-polluting and healthy too. Why go past the obvious. A well-established and mature technology.


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I think using some futuristic version of powerstriders would be pretty interesting. They already look pretty scifi as is, but you could imagine a fair amount of upgrades to make them more practical. To start with, it would be cool if they could be retracted, maybe stored behind the wearer's calf, with the blade folded in some manner. Perhaps the blade is ...


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From wikipedia on Roman Roads Roman construction took a directional straightness. Many long sections are ruler-straight, but it should not be thought that all of them were. Some links in the network were as long as 55 miles (89 km). Gradients of 10%–12% are known in ordinary terrain, 15%–20% in mountainous country. The Roman emphasis on constructing ...


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