New answers tagged

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Having garlic as a staple food would result in malnutrition and possibly even mass starvation. First of all, garlic is very low in fat and a lot of other nutrients, such as fiber, calcium, iron, etc. Therefore, people would have to consume a LOT of garlic. You would have to eat ~500 servings of garlic a day to get the daily amount of 2,000 calories, as each ...


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The problem is understanding which question to answer. Do you just want to justify your centralized government? Or do you genuinely want a solution for the quality problem? Assuming the latter: the guild does not have to monopolize the market by force. As long as they are providing consistently better quality, customers will choose them. Assuming the former: ...


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Coming at it from another tack to most of the other answers, and depending on the vibe you want to give; the guild happens to control a large supply of an important reagent for the potions. Many of the supplies are readily available, but the guild controls most of the market for the phlebotinum. It might mean that guild potions are more stable, or more ...


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You don't go after the old, powerful witches to bring them into the guild. You start fresh. You gather young witches into your guild collective by offering benefits like collective bargaining power, resource distribution, and buying their potions for later sale. Your new guild spends a lot of time taking the mundane out of the supernatural. Supply chain ...


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As the other two answers put it, I dont think there is any way you can make a logical increasing percentage per timeframe, due to scarcity being illogical to normal life. (specifically for westernized, more developed countries in our world) What I would suggest is look at real life examples of what happens when the brown stuff hits a fan. examples - The ...


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There is no realistic percentage to add to prices each week. A percentage each week assumes rational behavior by people. In scarcity, people are not rational. Instead, each week, prices are simply what people will pay. That could jump 100% (or more) per week. In a "panic", any price is "reasonable". For example, you mention a desert ...


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In a situation like this, prices depend on market 'logic' and psychology. I don't know where you live, but much of the West had a toilet paper shortage at the start of the Corona pandemic that was almost completely irrational. Many people wanted to stockpile, toilet paper got scarce, even more people wanted to stockpile ... If only half as much chocolate ...


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This seems like a fairly simple question of economics... ok, simple for economics at least. Your Potion Guild is trying to place themselves as the primary supplier of useful potions: healing, mana and stamina potions at least, maybe some more interesting utility potions like invisibility or ability buffs. They're using modern alchemical techniques to produce ...


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Dont leave it to the witches, but to the consumers. In the old days guilds were often local and they exerted power over their "domain". For example the cloth market in my city was a guild that was reknown for it's quality, so much so that its sails and other cloth was prized if it had received a special seal. The power of guilds has varied but can ...


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In the economy you've set up, there will always be (some) desire for cheap un-regulated potions or cauldrons. Maybe this guild can start "white market" and force those unregulated deals into the "black market" of brew making. Some people are just going to want to know what they are buying, and should be willing to pay a small membership ...


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I am unsure how familiar you are with farmer cooperatives (coops). These were quite popular in socialist countries and persist to this day. Some were/are in non-socialist countries as well, for example Italian Valfrutta. To me it seems the easiest way to do it, but I believe these are more modern invention than middle age guilds, so it might not fit. To me, ...


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Mutual Back Scratching A possibility is that a guild can come together because each witch is an independent person. A witch might have a rival in the magical arts, but even they could admit when somebody is better at something than they are. As long as their own field of superiority is acknowledged of course. A rivalry also does not have to be hostile -- ...


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I think this should be approached from 3 angles: the witches; the consumers; the government. 1. How to attract witches The guild can do the following to become of value for witches: accept apprentices and train them (this is especially valuable if the core members of the guild are powerful and well-known witches); give discounts on ingredients (the guild ...


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What you need is a signature spell. A spell that gives an object a (practically) unforgeable mark unique to the caster. Once you have that, have the guild master mass oroduce labels. Only guild members can label their potions with it. The guild should then enforce pricing and quality. Anyone who foes not meet standards loses labelling rights. People will ...


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The new guild uses a centralized facility that produces potions on an industrial scale. This gives: Lower priced potions because it costs less for bulk purchases of supplies and it also costs less for potion brewing on a large scale (e.g. larger cauldrons, less witches to supervise the process, etc.) Also, apprenticeships for new witches let them practice ...


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What you describe is nothing different than regular. Take beer or wine, for example. It's relatively easy for the first wannabe brewer to make one, but to make a good one it takes skills. And customers trust more well established makers. Who trusts the newcomer Jimmy McScammy, when Merlin has a solid reputation in his art? Moreover, even in a competitive ...


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Maybe a town in the Rocky Mountains, at the base of a mountain somewhere in the middle, maybe, and there's no road. Also, the residents hunt in the thick forest that surrounds the city and fish in a small stream that teems with fish. The population would be, perhaps, 100 people, 30 female adults, 30 male adults, 14 female seniors, 14 male seniors, and 12 ...


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Very unsophisticated Without the ability of the common people to track financial transactions, a society cannot progress beyond simple barter. Without numeracy it is impossible to even tax the peasants effectively - if they cannot record how much they have produced, how can they provide 1/10 or 1/5 of their output to their local lord? Even if the scribe ...


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Most of the answers seem to assume that somehow the MC has the ability to actually craft the items, at some level. In many computer games at least this is simply not so. Perhaps you can make a few minor items, but actual artifact-grade enchantment is well outside of the game mechanic. Morrowind for instance has a rich and exploit-laden crafting system, but ...


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To a certain degree, our society is like this. Have you ever tried reading academic papers in an area you are not familiar with? They may be written in your native language (or the language you are fluent in) but despite that, you will have a very hard time understanding them. The reason is field-specific terminology and patterns of presentation. In our ...


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In the past Actually this describes many ancient civilizations. Obviously the early middle ages but there are many other examples like the magi in ancient Babylon. Size matters Could a state advance and still keep this system possible depends on how large there priest/education class is a modern society requires a lot of highly educated specialists. So it ...


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A Cult or Administrative Group Can Not Completely Suppress Literacy While the early-to-high medieval period saw a lot less technological advancement than you saw in the classical period, they also did not really see a whole lot of technological regression either. Some knowledge was suppressed or lost while other knowledge was gained. The thing is that even ...


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Little chance it will be viable Sophistication in terms of technical achievements: probably not, unless there is a stack of hidden knowledge in the religious books, that can be explored. Slowly. In general, religions don't provide methods to approach exploration. Development and new knowledge are really needed for engineering. In a cultural sense, little ...


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Well, if you have read Eco's "The name of the rose", the Abbey had precisely that role: copying the knowledge and trying to prevent unworthy eyes from reading it, where the worthy eyes were only those fully indoctrinated. On a more realistic side, for centuries even the simple knowledge passed along the religious books of the Catholic religion was ...


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Making the artifact isn't hard. The materials are hard to procure, and the craftsmanship is time-consuming, but not particularly demanding of a particular skill level. The protagonist's time is better spent doing something he specializes in--procuring the materials. In addition, the artifact may be like a Jedi lightsaber, where each user takes pride in the ...


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If you want a game case where you can sell materials and finished goods and that you have finished goods selling for less than the materials, with same ability of your manufacturing than of others and same access to materials: Eve Online - most of stuff there is manufactured, and materials are mined. Reprocessing (now) gives less materials than was put in to ...


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Taxes and guilds The production and usage of the artifacts is obviously a thing of importance for the economy, and therefore desirable for the nobility to have control over, so they made a deal with crafters. Crafters organize into guilds, follow regulations, and can therefore afford the luxury of selling their products with no drawbacks. But if you're not ...


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Because there are more valuable things to make than the artifact out of the materials Making an artifact is inefficient with the materials it needs. Sure, bathing the final product in a bucket of dragon's blood really bakes in the power, but the residuum that leaches off makes all the blood that's left afterward useless for most other purposes. The real ...


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Guilds have the infrastructure to craft at volume, thus getting more value out of individual ingredients that an adventure would not be able to, given crafting requirements Take, for example, a herbal potion involving two herbs to make a single healing potion. For an adventurer, that sounds fine, they can make that, and they have the two herbs to do so. A ...


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I'll take an example from RuneScape, a game where this phenomenon is very common. Other players want the materials to train their skills. If you want to make armor out of steel, you must first learn to make armor out of iron. You must make a few hundred pieces of armor out of iron before you're good enough to attempt making armor out of steel. This creates a ...


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If you want a medieval flavour: because they do not have the monopoly for the artefacts. In our modern economies, we take for granted that if you want to make a widget then, provided you have the means to do so and you comply with local standards, you can do so and then it's up to you to compete with other people selling widgets. In most places, and most ...


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It is the economics of experience, which has value. When I have ingredients and transform them into a thing, I create two portions of value: The thing, and the experience. I consume the value of the ingredients and some value of my labor. If I am a novice, the value of my labor is low. When I sell the thing, its value is lower because I retain the value ...


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There are many reasons why it is more profitable to sell the reagents than the final product even if the adventurer has a higher skill and can make a better item. Failures: First and foremost is if it is possible to fail the adventurer would lose out on everything and not make any money. If there is a chance for failure why take that risk yourself? Leave ...


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Because you are selling to shops, not to adventurers I agree with the accepted answer in most settings, but not in the context of the genre. In many games, the best weapons are the ones you craft yourself; so, there is some assumption that your character either is a capable artificer, or you can at least level up that skill to become one. However, when you ...


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The MC isn't the best at crafting and pays the price of opportunity cost. I'm not a painter. I can take a bunch of expensive paints and craft a terrible painting, and it will be worth less than the raw materials. I'm also not a tailor. If I tried to make a garment out of an expensive fabric, I would just ruin the cloth. I am also not a jeweler. Given a bunch ...


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In today's world, we make more profit selling craft parts than we do selling the actual crafts. Who we are selling to are the hobbyists, the people who have the spare time to play with making things and the money to buy the parts. Yet, if one were to try to sell the crafts, few people want to pay the price needed to support the crafts person. People don't ...


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Diverse Uses: This is a bit like the 'Minecraft' version of an answer. If you have high-quality steel, do you already know what it will be made into? Sure, it COULD be made into a sword, but maybe the person buying the steel wants four knives. Maybe they make a specialty tool out of it. If you take the steel and make a sword, you can only sell it to a person ...


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Because the adventure's skill and reputation is always below that of a specialized craftsman. Bob the Blacksmith has been making swords all his life. He's spent 40 years perfecting the art of the turning metal into blades of death. He knows how to manage the furnace and molten metal and his collection of special hammers in order to create a wonderful sword. ...


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Why does a farmer sell the wheat to the miller instead of milling it and selling the flour? Why does the miller sell the flour to the baker instead of baking bread and selling the bread? Because any additional step requires time, resources, and knowledge that one can hardly have, together with capital to make the necessary investment: running a mill is ...


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There are special agreements between guilds that sell ingredients and guilds of professional crafters. Namely, they provide guilds of professional crafters with ingredients at low prices. In return the guilds of crafters buy enormous quantities of said ingredients, so this is win-win. This lowers supply of ingredients for people who are not professional ...


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There is not only the slave to take the curse, but the conduit to shoot the power to the slave -- or to the witch, if something goes wrong. This conduit is in fact a kind of permanent structure, attached to a person, and the witch must use her own, and not the slave's. The conduit takes damage over the years, and makes the curses cause more damage. In ...


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Satanic rituals are designed to cost increasing amounts. This is a common side effects of people who consign large numbers of souls to hell in dark magic rituals. You need to tap hellish magic, and while the first one is free, the cost increases in an escalating manner to encourage more souls consigned to hell. However, there is a solution. Once you have a ...


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I will make a few assumptions here, feel free to clarify. In terms of stability, there are at least two things to look at: 1. Intrinsic Value / Scarcity On tying an enumeration of money to a fixed amount of scarce and precious resource, good. You've just hedged a little at least against the primary financial crisis of the modern world. Intrinsic value (and ...


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This answer is based on the following assumptions: Black magic rituals do not change, only slave requirements increase over time. Your universe has a natural (magic) law according to which a curse-caster must pay a price for cursing others. The strength of the backlash of a curse depends on the number of curses that a witch previously cast. While a witch ...


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Your magi did not study the reason for the blowback. They started believing that it was a sort of a "tit-for-tat" requested by the Universe: one eye for one eye. In fact, one for one was just the point at which, in ancient times, curses were abandoned - because they had become impractical. In the depths of antiquity, the blowback effect was ...


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The battery of my first mobile used to last for 6-7 days from a charge to the other. The battery of my most recent mobile, even when brand new, lasted not even 1 and half day. Why is data? More computations, more data being exchanged, is simple terms more complexity, despite being both still named mobile phones. Same goes for your witches. The background ...


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An escalating market is a good thing for the provider. So it is not the slave industry which has problems, it is the curse casters who have trouble economic times ahead. They need to learn discretion and discernment in selecting their curse targets, because D-class mark carrier cost is increasing daily. This is a nice analogy to the oil producers who ...


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This is a frame-challenge to your assertion that these businesses would be "pushed into the red." It does not attempt to explain why a witch would need an increasing number of human sacrifices per curse. Pass the cost along to the customer First, I can only think of one way that these witches could be considered "businesses" who have to ...


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Think like a farmer or hunter. Get started by thinking of the cost of production. How much land do you need to rent for forage? Or how much does the food cost, for how long? (Sometimes you get a choice - you can lock the cow in a pen and feed it, or leave it "free range", with a modest difference in cost) If the animal is wild caught, think of ...


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You monetary system mimics the former British pre decimal system of pounds, shillings and pennies, where one shilling was 12 pennies and one pound was 20 shillings, thus one pound was 240 pennies. The British system had coins of intermediate value to make things, like change easier. There was half a penny, a three penny coin (threepence), a sixpence and a ...


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