New answers tagged

1

Like said by Shadowzee it is a catch-all term for a wide variety of materials. The Whipple shield on your ships and stations has an outer layer designed to break apart upon impact of a high velocity micrometeorite, causing the micrometeorite to burst and spread it's forces on the second layer of the Whipple shield that is designed to definitely not break. ...


3

I think the short answer is: you're missing a step. The next step in that picture isn't a currency exchange. If you've got a trader who's currently taking barter in exchange for their goods, the next step is to take the local currency instead. Instead of taking on 500 kilos of sodium chloride in payment, you get 500 cilrish - which you know you can use to ...


4

I worked in a electronic trading of currencies and commodities. Typically, there is not a single exchange market but the price would be more or less the same. The liquidity of the market and the spread (difference between BUY and SELL aka BID-ASK) determine how likely customer would use your market. Travel between the planets takes a few days Does it ...


2

I was thinking, if they are different life beings and have different life standards and materials use, what they have in common? Because one of the civilizations could valerate gold, whereas the others simply don't care. But what they have in common? Both have difficulties and cost to travel between their two planets. The exchange rate could be a trip from ...


6

As bitcoin history shows, currency exchanges will emerge very quickly as soon as the currency is considered to have some nonzero value, despite exchange rate fluctuations. The rates on all these exchanges tend to quickly converge, and are used as a basis even for other people who trade directly. Even after failures of large exchanges like MtGox, the trade ...


1

During the barter phase, when you were trading a ship full of grain for some crates of microprocessors, you established the relative values of the commodities. Now that you have this information you can start trading with tokens, like the federal reserve notes. The parties will have to establish a clearing house for transactions, the parities between the ...


3

OK, let's think about it: we have roughly market economies on both sides we have not united planets with already non uniform jurisdiction => they must already have some rules governing conflict of laws or law of the sea we have modern states, which detest any power vacuum and just in case would impose (or even usurp) their authority on everything closing ...


15

Why have an exchange rate? Just deal in the local currency on whichever end of the trip I am at, and carry my wealth in the form of goods that will sell well at my next stop. Freight carriers don't like to run with empty holds, it is a waste of resources to sit still longer than necessary to unload and reload, and an even bigger waste to move while empty. ...


9

Comparing commodities. Money, after all, is just an abstract representation of goods and services. The only reason any form of fiat currency has power is its ability to be swapped for either a good or a service. A way to get an idea at what the exchange rate would be is to just compare a common and frequently used commodity between the two and use it to set ...


35

You just pass laws on each world allowing the purchase and sale of the other world’s currency, with some sensible regulation to make sure people can’t get ripped off. Then the markets will establish the exchange rate and arrange the physical transport of any currency that actually needs to be moved, just like between two countries on Earth at present.


0

Assumption: Barbaric Overgrowths With the natural setting of your world, I bet a lot of plants and animals became a lot more savage. This means animal domestication and plant eugenics would be pretty hard to accomplish for the first few generations. This results in food itself becoming such a rare commodity, considering that many canned goods would have ...


1

What about pages from books? Wouldn’t have much tactical value but they would be hard to come by and people would desire them, plus if they were from a technical book or something they would be even more valuable, and you bring one book with you and you can pay for a lot.


3

With such a tiny population (2000-4000 is a small town, not a "city"), very little will be passed on. Example: The city's size might support a single doctor and a single lawyer, each with a single apprentice. Certainly not an entire medical school or law school. The entire scientific background of clinical medicine will be lost in favor of merely practical ...


5

Medicine. I am a great fan of Ambroise Pare. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ambroise_Par%C3%A9 I recommend anyone interested in this stuff read his Apologie and Treatise. He is a super engaging and interesting writer and you really get a feel for his personality and the times in which he lived. Pare was a 16th century barber-surgeon and is best known for ...


0

I honestly don't see this individual as being severely disabled in all honesty. He has two working legs and one arm. If socialization is the largest issue, I can immediately see him being a herder or ranch-hand of some sort, either of sheep, goats or pigs. This is including riding horseback to carry out his tasks. Writing from personal experience, you ...


2

There are a couple big problems with importing most of your food. It makes you vulnerable economically. If one of your sources raises their price for, say, rice...you may not have much choice. This is called inelastic demand, and is a good way for your suppliers to siphon a great deal of your wealth away. Today we have lots of alternatives worldwide for ...


2

One arm is all you need to be a scribe. And any sort of management, overseeing or inspection job doesn't require a lot of arms. With his military background though, maybe he would be a good night watchman? Minimal interaction with people, all he needs are sharp eyes and a bell to ring if there's trouble. Also, even one-armed he's probably a match for most ...


2

Ok, according with things we know about the "medieval", meaning ~1000 years of time, it was pretty common to have some physical defect. Poliomyelitis, poor medicine skills, poor hygienic conditions, terrible birth procedures, and more, made really hard to create individuals like a modern person would consider "healthy". Sure, most of population was more ...


0

Marginalia: About the topic that appeared in the comments before, that a society would try to advance technologically... I guess keeping things real is an important thing, to ask what would probably happen. The other question is what do you want your world to be like? If there are things you want to write about, there are ways to lay out a historic ...


0

Since he was given a dishonourable discharge, he won't get any veteran payment, so he needs to earn his living. He needs to find a living, but not necessarily earn it. It seems to me that as a disgraced ex-soldier, the natural thing would be for him to become an outlaw, hiding in the forest and scraping together his food by gathering nuts and berries, ...


1

According to oral history (sorry for not providing proper sources) after WW2 in my country (Austria), veterans with disabilities (e.g. a lost arm or leg) were given preferential treatment in regards to physically not-demanding jobs, i.e. opening a kiosk for tobacco or newspapers, or opening a cinema.


0

Only slightly out of period, consider the tontine, invented in or by 1689. Many people pay into a pot, the last survivor gets it. (The system can be abused, which is why it fell out of favor as people grew more financially sophisticated.) This system was used to finance businesses and wars, among other uses. A less sophisticated version is the purchase ...


15

Anything he wants I worked with a hardware store manager who had one arm. He could lift anything. Move anything. Manipulate any tool. He wasn't held back at all. Missing one arm is incredibly inconvenient. Certainly a disability. It means things are more difficult. But it wouldn't stop anybody from doing almost anything. (I'm actually having ...


6

If you look at historical stories of miracles, those often have good portrayals of the disabled. Religion is wrote about in detail, and disabled people are normally not written about but when some miraculous healing is given that is an excuse to write of them. For example, the miracles of St. Bertin tell of a man who was not able to see outside well enough ...


32

There is a book that is commonly referenced for medieval life questions called Life in a Medieval Village by Frances and Joseph Gies. If you're interested in realism you should be able to draw a lot of inspiration from it. The book focuses on a English village called Elton around the 13th century. Among the manorial court records there are references to ...


14

He could do many jobs but with military training and very scarce contact with people, he could be a trapper, hunting small game for furs and meat. He would find good places to place traps (which he could do with one arm, feet and teeth, as lassos used for rabbits don't require a lot of strength) and he could use dogs, ferrets or similar animals to help him ...


2

As Henry Taylor said, post scarcity cultures have different needs. Two approaches: What they will clamor for vs. what they should be getting if they knew what was good for them. They will clamor for, and be willing to pay for, novelty. Possibly based on reconstituted samples, computer-regenerated-via-DNA-files, or holograms digitally beamed across space. ...


1

To be frank, for a civilization that has established routine space travel, I don't see that the colonies can really offer anything that Earth would want, apart from tourism and rare luxuries like exotic foods. For an industrial civilization, you need three things to create wealth: Raw materials, energy, and human effort. For a civilization that has ...


2

Aren't most Golden Age Sci-Fi worlds post-scarcity? With asteroid-mining, robotic-manufacturing and first-world-everywhere-population-control, won't we have outlived the need for economics? If so, then all that the mother world would want is the art, music and poetry of the child world, shared freely in exchange for their own art, music and poetry. ...


0

A Trade in Antiques and Trinkets The now advanced earthlings want relics of the stone ages. But they destroyed the ones on their planets long ago. These are just regular items of use for the people colonizing the backward planet, who have fashioned much of their wares from the spares of the terraform kits and the ships etc that carried them. So, rich ...


3

Resources Same thing every colonizer wants, resources. This may be in iron, wood, slaves/employees....just resources of any kind. Maybe just clean air and water. Tourism is a possibility too. Earth's people/corporations will have some scarcity that they don't or can't get from Earth (or the solar system). To satisfy that demand, they will naturally go ...


1

Military: Mercenaries, weapons, training, logistics (e.g. canned food), technology, etc Quality of live: Jewelry, technology, glassware, food, art, literature, etc Production: Technology, tools (e.g. steel mining picks), machines, slaves, etc Services: Companionship, banking, outsourced prisons, education, performances, etc Abstract: Alliances, land ...


3

Various foods. Venison. This matured and flavorsome meat would be highly valued by people who only have fish, crabs, prawns and sea-slugs as protein sources. Those who enjoy the ultimate acquired taste of the sea urchin, may also gain a taste for Fois gras. Pheasant. Again a luxury meat which requires dry-air preparation, strong, rich flavor - a rare ...


2

I am going to go with another material manufactured via fire: Coins of Glass I could see Coins of Glass being a legitimate currency. Because it is an item that can be only be crafted by humans, the rarity of it would be its value -- MUCH more valuable than all that cheap gold we have lying around the sea-bottom. Of course merfolk wouldn't realize that ...


2

Medicine Just as the oceans have a bounty of medicinal fish and plants, so too does the land, in rainforests, deserts, all over. Obviously, merfolk would not generally be able to waltz deep into a rainforest to collect plants. Stone Given that merfolk have limited access to metals/tools, they would have a hard time quarrying anything but the softest ...


2

Freshwater fish. Living in the sea, this would be an otherwise unobtainable delicacy.


5

Territoriality. They would want surface dwellers to stop doing certain things, or start doing certain other things. Stop dumping that filth in the river! Whew! It really stinks. On the other hand, if you dump your raw sewage in this other river, it will nicely fertilize the commercial kelp beds. Stop using drag nets to fish in this area. That's our garden ...


5

Okay, I'm going to go there. Sex. It's going to happen. You know it, I know it. Mermaids know it. Professional mermaids say 'merverts' are making their lives a hassle Can't have a believable economy without the oldest profession.


10

Many of the ideas I had (metal goods, ceramics, etc) are well-described by other answers. So I'll focus on the ones that are not yet listed. Storage Even on land, secure storage of goods is an important service. Banks can secure actual goods (think safe deposit boxes) or virtual ones (a tally of your money, so you don't have to hide it under your ...


6

A pair other ideas about what merfolks could desire from surface people: air: surface people could easily fill animal bladders or goatskins with air (they have lungs) and sell them to the merfolks: they could be used as entertainment (think of bubble fountains for the VIP parties) or to help lifting heavy weights underwater. Of course, if merfolk have lungs ...


6

Don't think too hard - just look at real life In a way you kind of answered your own question. In real life we have lots of countries that buy/sell each other loads of things. In the past, we had barter, but many governments minted their own coin. This goes back to at least Ancient Greek times - the Chinese even had paper currency! Alternatively, larger ...


21

Let me list a few ideas: Metal products. It is very unlikely that there would be many merfolk willing to spend prolonged periods of time outside of water just to craft metal objects. Metal products can be many, from weapons(most likely harpoons, or other weapons that are meant to stab) to tools, jewelry and ornaments. While rare, you don't need to use much ...


2

My first choice was going to be metal, but you've already mentioned that it's a limited resource for the land people. My second choice is decorated stone / statues, reasonining is pretty simple. I can't imagine weilding a hammer and chisle underwater being very efficient. So for the rich merfolk they would commission pillars, statues and ornamants as the ...


8

Trade Goods What They Have... Fish Medicinal Underwater Plants Psychotropic Underwater Plants Transportation (storm-proof undersea barges) Coral and Geodes Nonferrous Metals Shipwreck Cargo What They Want... Rustproof Metal Tools and Weapons Bags/Jugs of fresh water Buoyant wood - it is like anti-gravity to them


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