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Nature has already provided blueprints for biological changes to support head bashing techniques, just look to goats and woodpeckers for how they can avoid giving themselves headaches. Both of these species have incredibly dense bone in the area of the skull called the braincase. Additionally because you wouldn't want pokey bits of bone skewering your ...


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Reinforced Cranium That is, a buildup of bone, muscle, and tissue on top of the head where the impact happens. Presumably the horn is made up of keratin (as with the horns of most land animals), and thus it's not bad at taking impacts either, but this is the simplest solution - reinforce the point of impact. Aside from that, nothing needs to be changed to ...


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No, kicking would not be effective. Kicking are already easily defended against in normal humans. This is because the larger mass of your leg means that kicks have lower velocity. This problem can be alleviated somewhat with training, but it is still a problem. Now, take your hypothetical ogre. Due to having 15 times the mass of a normal human, his kicks ...


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In addition to 'physical' barriers that your hypothetical creatures need to overcome, there's another side to this story, and that's the consciousness. We know far less about it than we know about the Quantum world, but even then it's quite clear that any being with consciousness is more than just the sum of its molecules. For instance, our brain is able ...


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I could imagine some kind of hive species where 99% of the population are "workers" and look the same. Only the queen and drones may look different. They could even look so different that space travellers wouldn't recognize them to belong to the species. Or another idea: They are human-like and depend only on artificial insemination or some kind of cloning. ...


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No There are two layers to physical appearance - genotype and phenotype. Genotype is the written instructions for appearance based on the DNA. This is where terms like 'heterozygous' come into play. It's very important, and theoretically you could have a race where everyone has the same genotype for physical appearance. I'm not sure why it would evolve as ...


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Such a race would have interesting implications. One really tricky bit of this is defining "looks the same." I'm reminded of a story I heard of bars with a large Asian customer base hiring Asian bouncers because the white bouncers had more trouble identifying one customer from another by facial features. The distinctions in the Asian facial structure were ...


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Yes, it is possible. Physical appearance is not controlled just by genes - you can always get a facelift, or you can have your face distorted by an accident - but genes play a major part of it. If there is very little genetic variation in the population, people will tend to look all the same. There will be those who say that little genetic variety is bad ...


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As with any biological property this would only happen if it is sexually attractive and biologically preferable to be 'exactly the same', but it won't last long and the concept of 'race' is misleading to say the least Many species evolve distinctive features because they are sexually attractive to mates - look at the signal theory for more detail. But the ...


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Not all that fast. I"ll assume from context that what you're describing is like a snake-centaur. e.g. a human torso with a snake body extending from the pelvis. As far as locomotion is concerned, what you're describing is basically just a slightly larger anaconda that has to carry a significant portion of its body mass up off the ground (the human torso)....


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You might want to first ask yourself where the fungus would be hosted. Each of your organs offer very different environments in which a micro-organism can live. The additional functions granted by the fungus would then depend on which organs are affected: Skin: By forming a thick coating on the host's skin, the fungus would serve as a protection against ...


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There has been plenty of humanization of dragons and maybe working those into a human society. I picture a society seperated into small clans. Being mindful of others could be a universal trait in dragon culture. Maybe there could be an emphasis on the material possesions of a dracotaur as a show of some kind of prowess. Maybe skins or accessories. I ...


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Two-headed creatures - or even humans - are not unknown in reality, and have even been known to survive to adulthood, so as a point mutation it is not beyond the bounds of possibility for it to occur over a very short period relative to the typical evolutionary timescale. In order for this condition to persist across generations, there are several pre-...


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Two thoughts: First, there's no particular reason that the brain needs to be located in the head. Such a creature could have a single brain located in the body cavity, in which case the 'heads' would be little more than sensory extensions, allowing it to see, speak, and smell in different directions simultaneously. The heads would appear to act ...


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