New answers tagged

1

'As deadly': doable. for one shot. The 'Texan' is marketed as 'the worlds most powerful production airgun' and is supposed to reach about 800J of muzzle energy. For comparison, a NATO 7,62×51 is listed by Wikipedia as having around 3000J of energy (NATO 5,56×45: 1500J), so while the airgun is somewhat lacking, it is already in the same ballpark. Airguns for ...


2

Who needs METAL? Just make a wooden sword. :) It's like a wooden steak knife, only bigger. Digest out the lignite, press down until it's 23 times harder than wood and 3 times sharper than a metal knife, coat in mineral oil. I'll admit though, while it's impressive to drive wooden nail it is rather sad to watch how slow it is. Miracles should be snappier. ...


4

One quick but critical point before getting into the details. Metal blades tend to be really thin, often as much as structurally possible, so this question really boils down to: can wood actually help you make an effective blade with even less metal? I think the biggest issue is the use of a wooden core. Combining wood and metal is certainly nothing new (...


2

No. It doesn't make much sense. Sword is a sword because of its combined qualities. It's a piece of balanced metal giving you ability to cut, stab, block and has a certain fairly fixed ratio of durability to mass. It's also expensive, requires training and has limited range. Spear is simple, cheap, can be made with almost no metal and you can often kill ...


0

Take a good look at the Aztec weapon called maquahuitl which was wood with a bunch of obsidian glued in. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Macuahuitl https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Ceremonial_Macuahuitl.jpg


2

Perhaps instead of some sharp bits stuck onto the wooden sword, it could be more of a steel-clad sword with a wooden core, hilt, and handle. Something where to the casual observer it would still appear to be an almost entirely metal sword. I think a very dense hardwood like Leadwood, quebracho, or camelthorn would make for an excellent core. Hardwoods like ...


1

Unless you have a special type of copper wire then I doubt it would be that useful; because if it's too thin, then the current would melt/vaporise the wire: and if it is too thick it would start to significantly affect the range of the ballista. As an alternative weapon you could use a rail gun type weapon as they are relatively simple to build and the ...


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Wood and metal are not very good mechanical friends, except for putting a round bit of wood in a round hole in the metal, or vice versa. Handles or shafts, basically. That is not what we need here though. The thermal expansion ratios differ too much, the response to water differs enormously. Wood loves to absorb water and expand! However, not all is lost! If ...


1

would it be any more effective then a normal ballista, and if so, how? Well, if the goal were to board the target vessel then having a live wire attached to them would certainly discourage attempts to remove the bolt. If it were wet enough (and you could see how that might happen), things nearby to the impact point would become hazards, too. I'm not sure ...


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improving a club with sharp bits The classic solution to having access to a stick and a small amount of sharp stuff was to make a spear out of it. The pattern has been repeated across many civilizations using many different materials across a very wide span of time (from about a quarter of a million years ago, to Napoleonic lancers, for example). It works ...


15

No, it won't work. Wood moves with the moisture; first rain and the wood will swell, 2-3 days after with a nice weather and the pressed strip of metal falls off. BTW, wood swell/shrink mostly on the radial and tangential direction. Better (or worse) yet, the wood is stronger along the fiber, so you will press your strip on a tangential direction - the ...


1

Some ideas for this: Poisonous bite, where alcohol is the venom. The venom is stored in a specialised organ in the body and is released upon biting. Injecting a large volume of ethanol into the bloodstream of the victim would weaken the victim's ability to fight back. Moreover, perhaps ethanol is converted to methanol in the venom gland, making deadlier in ...


2

Step one: absorption. Pick a wavelength that isn't strongly absorbed by the atmosphere. This roughly means any wavelength that some kind of animal can see, because those wavelengths are the one that propagate best through an atmosphere. Here's a helpful-ish diagram from this paper. Most things that aren't visible are strongly absorbed by the atmosphere... ...


3

Infrared. https://news.usni.org/2020/05/22/video-uss-portland-fires-laser-weapon-downs-drone-in-first-at-sea-test The issue for your endeavor is scatter. 10 km is a long way. Shorter wavelengths have more energy but they scatter more. Longer wavelengths are less energetic but less prone to scatter. Infrared uses long wavelengths that are absorbed by ...


0

I'd go with Small charge to propel a permanent magnet through a coil for about 10-100J in magnetic flux extra step of helical explosively pumped flux compression generator pumping up the current to 5-10kJ (AK-47 has somewhere around 6-7kJ per shot - so no a lot of extra explosive required) The energy available should be enough get quite a hot plasma, ...


3

is there a mechanism that can satisfy these two situations? You want cheap, simple, obvious? Use two different mechanisms. I'd take a page out of HEAT warhead design and use a piezo-electric contact trigger at the business end of the projectile, and two different means to make use of the on-contact current spike to detonate some explosive charge either ...


4

You just need to tune the delay between the impact and the explosion by properly setting the primer to give the right amount of time. It doesn't take that much space, and can totally fit in the flechette.


1

The problem with trying to make a sword out of compressed air is, What's going to keep it in that shape? If you're assuming that the air is compressed by some magic power, maybe you could. Who knows what magic can do? Pretty much anything you say you want it to do. But if you're trying to be more "hard science", sure, you could have some machine ...


2

With regard to the question "If someone could control air particles and compress them could they become as hard as a sword?", air is made up of mostly nitrogen and oxygen. Both can form solids, usually by freezing, but also at room temperature by exerting tremendous pressure; you'd probably want only one or the other since a mixture would probably ...


6

According to safety sheets one can find in the mare magnum of internet, compressed air bears its own risks Hazards of compressed air and compressed air equipment Flying particles and debris – can result in eye injuries, cuts/scrapes or other significant injuries to almost any body part; High pressure air – can result in air injection into the body leading ...


0

/On the whole I think you'd be better looking at some sort of berserker @Chris H/ Oh yeah. He is stronger when he drinks alcohol. In large part because he is less careful but he is also stronger because he is singing his fighting song. His weapon is whatever is handy. It is never the same thing twice because that thing is usually not fit to be used as a ...


1

Holes in the ground. Because of the cube-square law, giants are more vulnerable to falling damage than people. In real life we see this with elephants: This moat is enough to keep the elephants inside.


4

Comments under the question address how much alcohol could be in someone's blood. I'll assume you've handwaved away the limitation that they're unconscious by the time they've accumulated enough to be worth burning. I've built a stove that burns alcohol. It's basically the bottom of a drinks can in a windshield. If I load that up with 10 ml of fuel, ...


0

I love magic tags.. Use magic to create the bow Suppose you know how much force your super human archer can apply. Then design the appropriate light weight, proper sized material using this, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bending_stiffness after studying this https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Euler%E2%80%93Bernoulli_beam_theory .. and ask your Magus to create a ...


1

Ballistas Since your goal is to maximize power, let's think big, increase the weight of the arrows through both size and material so that it could hardly be considered as regular bow ammunitions, and use the power of ballistas to throw them at the enemy. Ballistas are normally siege weapons, rarely used in field battles. This is notably due to the fact that ...


0

Your super archers would use a bow with higher draw weight. What you want is pretty much a bow part of a crossbow, just without frame. Alternatively, you may get crossbows with even higher draw strength. How would you get that draw strength? If those people are taller than human, they may use slightly longer straight bows, as that will give them a bit more ...


1

There's a difference between space travel being uneconomically impractical due to the expense and number of expendable stages required, and it being actually impossible, and it's far more likely for super-Earths capable of supporting technological civilizations to fit in the former category. It may be that the presence of alien spacecraft in the system is ...


2

Buoyancy supported launching platforms - balloons well above the turbulent zone of the atmosphere, say at an altitude corresponding to 50km in Earth conditions (mesosphere). Will work for rocket based weaponry, platforms for direct energy defenses. Likely will work for space exploration rocket launches (bollocks, I don't think an air breathing intelligent ...


0

Super Earth life may not be able to launch lifeforms easily, but perhaps those Super Earths have multiple moons or other forms of long-lived attracted debris of different sizes/masses. Sufficiently advanced super earth lifeforms could manipulate those objects to crash or interfere with visiting craft or their communications systems.


4

They wouldn't Let's set that straight: bows are lousy weapons. Welsh longbows are lousy and encumbering. Throughout the middle ages in Europe there were thousands of battles. Bows were useful in only two of them, both won by the british, and this has made the longbow a sort of mythical status as a medieval uber-weapon, just like the absurd glorification of ...


1

Fire arrows I was thinking about the question and how size differences would be surprising in some sense. A sword might be dull against humans, but be needle sharp against a 20x bigger wolf. Images of great wolf Sif from Dark Souls comes to mind. It would be a big needle, but a needle nonetheless. Needling something to death wile it can swipe once to kill ...


7

Double bow. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_8ui1irplhM This dude is an Astriad! You can tell. And besides his might, he is a maker of awesome things and so himself magnitudes more awesome. He has made an awesome double bow with double the pull of a single bow. Thus he can leverage his magestic mightytude without requiring any unobtanium. "But!&...


3

Just barely. Since the physics behaves similarly to if the colonists had shrunk, we can reason backwards by scaling down the weapons available at the time. Cannons: According to this website, 19th century cannons propelled shots up to 32lb at speeds of 1700ft/sec. Scaling down, this gives us roughly 1.8g at 26m/s. Wikipedia states that a BB gun firing ...


1

Harpoon! A harpoon can go right through another vehicle. Then you have got it. The beauty of the harpoon is that you can then use the mass of the vehicle you have harpooned to pull yourself forward while you pull it back, slinging yourself ahead of the harpooned one (this is racing, right?) while disadvantaging your competitor.


0

Not impossible. Prepare several large fish tanks in a bunker in Siberia. Cold, but not extreme cold. The bunker is suitably armored. Make the fish tanks airtight using silicone. You have now containers made of glass and silicone, both very, very long-lived. Place the weapons in the tanks, disassembled and cleaned for safety, then flood the tanks with ...


1

They Would Require a Modern Machine Shop to Restore 20th century firearms were machined to very tight tolerances (typically 1-3 1000ths of an inch). This means that all the moving parts are always in a state of being pressed together. Even if you stored these guns in a perfectly inert environment, within the first few decades of not moving the metal parts ...


-1

I think both regions could use the same scenario to provide what you need. As others have said, the primary issue is going to be general exposure. Oxygen, moisture, humidity, etc. If any of this is present your scenario becomes far less probable with a 700 year timeframe. So we have to get creative. Let's shift our thinking a bit and say they don't find guns ...


0

I have no problem with the guns being functional if they were packed with long term storage in mind. As for why--some governmental organization hid them there as supplies for special forces units to operate while out of touch. Such weapons would be packed to last and well concealed--they were found because ground movement exposed the cache. Unfortunately, ...


3

This is EXACTLY what the 1st firearms were When you say first firearms, most people think of the Handgonne, but before these were a thing, the first firearm was actually the Chinese Fire Lance. The firelance was basically a single use shotgun on the end of a spear. Their range was terrible and their stopping power questionable, which perfectly fits with ...


1

Best approximation for what you need would be a shotgun + spear combination. It seems that what you're creating makes long-range firearms pointless, so let's go short range. Shotgun can take an impressive range of ammunition, and it's so simple design it can be built into a all-metal spear or pike no problem. It can even be worked into detachable-magazine-...


0

Probably a skilled sword or knife fighter can parry with one blade while thrusting with the other. Thrusting with both weapons with force would require the fighter to lean forward and use his legs to accelerate his body & thus the blades forward.


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