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In the Ringworld books, the "Puppeteer" aliens have their brains located in their torsos, while their heads are more like a hand/eyestalk combination equipped with a mouth. An apex predator with a similar body plan could look very much like Cerberus or the Hydra. As for the "mane/tail of snakes", how about jellyfish-style stinging ...


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Adaptive Conjoined Twins: My answer is actually going to be a variant of my answer to THIS question based on some creative developmental handwavium. I would imagine a fantasy world where a developmental mutation occurs, is somehow taken up by a common virus, and spread to many new species. In this case, you need a stable genetic shift that causes essentially ...


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It's a wolf with 3 heads. 3-headed animals are not unheard of, so it would be possible for a 3-headed wolf to exist. The snake tail could be a symbiote, trading protection of the rear in exchange for blood and poop as nourishment. I'm not so sure about the mane of vipers, but our Cerberus could have snake-like locks of hair that look so much like snakes that ...


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Make them mind-controlling parasites. The book series (not the movie series) of How to Train Your Dragon, by Cressida Cowell, has distinct subspecies of dragons that fall under the 'nanodragon' category. The vast majority of naondragons are based off insects. These dragons would be the same way, but based off parasitic wasps (oh, and Xenomorphs). One of ...


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Perhaps absorbing a creature's magical essence brings more than just dumb luck. Sure, having luck is great, but only unleashed for one time? A time that may or may not be random? Plenty of people (idiot people) would try to hunt down magical creatures for luck or as a sign of bravery, but smart people would likely stay away. It only lasts a few seconds, and ...


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Let's say a species with a weird face, twin, snakelike penises, paws for hands, thorny scales, and clawed feet was peacefully dwelling in a forest one day when radiation hit it and mutated it into Humbaba. Problem solved: you have an anatomically correct Humbaba!!!


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one technology i can think off that can be done before premodern times is elevator, it exist even during greek era. for example like this from:https://landmarkelevator.com/history-of-elevator-technology/ probably require multiple elevator checkpoint to lift them up to the top. As early as 236 BC, the ancient Greek mathematician, Archimedes built the first ...


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You should get a lot of huge and most importantly FLAT boats. Then load them with huge Bombards, Trebuchets, Catapults. also get a few turtle ships armed with spikes and crossbows near the monster, they might die through. Also, get some floating towers topped with the biggest crossbows you have. It might work if the creature stays on the surface BUT if it ...


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The hairy frog, Trichobatrachus robustus, creates retractable claws by breaking the bones in its feet. Many frogs begin their life in a tadpole stage, eventually adding limbs and losing their tail as they age. If there was an evolutionary advantage (such as spending a large portion of their life swimming), the adult form could keep the tail, although it ...


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Algae 80% of the earth's free oxygen comes from photosynthesizing algae. The mermaids could "plant" it in an airtight room, and then place a pipe at the top which goes to a storage reservoir. Used air would be pumped back into the algae farm to restore the oxygen. One caveat: they might want to mix some used air into the fresh air; while oxygen is ...


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Electrolyze water to produce a mixture of oxygen and hydrogen for breathing. Purification and other processing may be required to prevent inhalation of halogen gas.


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Homo Atlantis A technological overview of Atlantians, also known as “mer-people” To see how mer-people behave when they are interacting with technology, we need to see that encounters with humans have rarely brought about peaceable exchange. Instead, tales of siren calls widowing brave sailors, and cruel marriage of spheres to the Krakenoid and Cthuloid ...


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Mermaids would have an intuitive understanding of water currents, convection, and quite possibly sea life. Natural human curiosity and observation will likely lead to many animal-inspired technologies, selective breeding, and quite possibly pressure-related technology. For example, an octopi's water jets (they use water for propulsion) could inspire pumps. ...


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The King of the merpeople has power over the creatures of the sea. He simply commands whales to take a deep breath at the surface and breath out beneath the giant seashell cupola grown for the landpeople's convenience.


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Sonics - Many aquatic mammals have complex auditory communications that can travel thousands of miles. They also have complex anatomy that enables them to send and receive these messages. Mathematics - much of human geometry is based on starting in 1 or 2 dimensions and extrapolating to 3 since we live largely on a 2d surface and our primary visual system is ...


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Undead liche warriors are of course a staple of the marauding hoardes of the madder sort of Witch King. Sadly, without some pretty powerful dwimmery or high technology, there's just no merely natural way of doing what you want. Essentially: Living bones regenerate by taking in nutrients from the blood; they are able to direct their own growth and ...


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Skyscraper-like underwater buildings would have less logistic problems to design: If the mermaids can swim up and down, there is no need for stairs, elevators, or ladders. There is also no need for fire escapes because the risk of fire is very low. However, carving stone would be much more difficult, since hammers would be hard to use underwater. Merfolk can'...


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It seems quite obvious, but fish farming and fishery should be the obvious answer. We landlings have had a few thousands of years for developing domesticated animals like chicken, sheep, cow, horse and so on, which we use for getting access to meat, while we fish farming has been a rather recent exploit. For merpeople I would guess the opposite would be true:...


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My first thought is they would develop science in anything to do with pressure: Pipes, gasses, biology, etc., as they will be familiar with the bends and what happens when you try to take air deep underwater, and so they they'd likely make good use of buoyancy in their engineering. For example: Imagine using bags of air to hold up a heavy stone, as you shift ...


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It runs very fast. The Ostrich has long claws, adapted for running, so I guess the Enfield's claws are long because it chases very fast-running prey.


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Plants. They would need a lot of them, but the plants would remove the carbon dioxide and supply the oxygen, given enough appropriate water and light. There would also need to be a process to get people back up if the city is very deep, owing to the bends.


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They could use some sort of reverted bucket-wheel excavator, where the bucket-wheel would capture air from above the water and would convey it to an underwater central storage. From there it can be distributed to the local users with a system of piping and pumps, not much different than what happens with gas. And don't forget that, apart from providing ...


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The mermaids could split water molecules using electrolysis. It's a relatively simple process and it's the same way that astronauts make oxygen. However, the mermaids would have to split a lot of water molecules to supply an entire hotel.


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What I think we're looking at is a highly mutated subspecies of hominid; possibly evolved from Gigantopithecus or a relative of that long-extinct creature. Why Gigantopithecus? Because that prehistoric ape is related to (precedes) both hominids and orangutans, plus it had a very large size. Furthermore, an orangutan's diet is composed of 90% fruit, and if ...


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