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1

Maybe, but a few things to consider Really big scavengers can be highly-susceptible to extinction. So make sure that there's plenty of food in your world to go around. The Short-Faced Bear is an excellent example of this. They were the biggest, scariest scavenger running around and then the climate changed and bam they're extinct. This is why obligate ...


4

Sure! Could easily evolve from the only slightly shorter Gigantopithecus. You don't ask for a reality check, but in all honesty, 1 mph is pretty slow. Though you could mix in a bit of sloth for good measure, at about 125 feet per day. Not much of an ambush predator, unless your beasty starts its ambush last week. On the other hand...


1

Yes, but make them mammals. Assume they are simply a species of large bat with human-like faces and the rest of it falls into place. Just as flying foxes have a surprisingly fox-like faces, these have human features. The story about having an attractive song is is a complete blind. What the sirens really do is wait for dark or bad weather (because bats are ...


1

Your description immediately made me think of the harpies. So it would not seem entirely out of the picture to imagine these sirens of yours being an evolution of the "harpy eagle" a species that recalls the human face in an almost disturbing way, moreover, given its size, it would not detach too much from the size you mention. I also don't believe ...


4

Female giants are built like male giants, because giant babies are not giant. Giants are a homo species. They are not that distant from we sapiens. The difference is that giants keep growing and growing. And growing. They are long lived and as opposed to growing for their first 16 years they grow for the first 30 years or more. Adult giants have ...


0

Most examples I can think of for giant women in popular culture are highly sexualized, such as the Amazonians from Futurama, or Diane from Seven Deadly Sins. Practically I suppose it would depend on the intelligence and the time it takes for a giant to develop out side of the womb. Humans have trouble birthing due to the large size of our heads. If giants ...


-2

The lamia may have evolved from an early marsupial. In order to protect themselves, they may have adapted to spray foul smelling substances from the glands near the tail like a skunk. They may also grow scales over their body, to protect themselves from predator's attacks. In order to avoid being attacked in their sleep, they may evolve to sleep less, until ...


0

Human dwarfs are anyone 4'10" and under regardless of the sex. The average US height is 5'6". That is 88% of the average height, which is 7'11" for your fictional race. The shortest human ever was 1'9.5", the giant equivalent of this would be 2'11", so dwarfs of your species should range from 2'11" to 7'11".


1

An average US male is 69.1 in tall and 197.9 lb with a 40.2 in waist. the human torso is 53.33% of the total height (the legs are too, they overlap). I am going to cut it off right where the leg starts, so the torso will only be 46.67% of the height, which is 32.25 in. An adult male's torso and arms would be 83.3% of their total mass, or 164.9 lb. I am going ...


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