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1

Crocodile head is specialized for water, long limbs are bad for swimming.... Best bet would be that it was some type of mammal that was transitioning into aquatic life, then it changed idea and when back to land, this would explain a non aquatic animal with a crocodile like head.


1

I like the idea of using hermit crab tenancies with the described "natural state" as being an amorphous blob, (imagine Gastropod such as a giant slug), or perhaps an octopus like body, as the basis for a mimic. As others stated, it could simply obtain a new "shell" as it grew in size. I imagine it breaking apart a container in order to empty it, and then use ...


-2

It could be created using genetic engineering/Synthetic Biology. Or take bats, Scorpions and Lion genes and mix them to create it.


4

So basically a steppe mammoth. They fulfill all your criteria -Herbivore, check -Front limbs longer than back limbs, big check -Tusks, huge check -Long tail, well long for a large mammal, plus there is no reason you could not use a slighlty modified one with a longer tail, just say it is sexual selection. -Ox like head, well minus horns anyway. -...


1

Not to be cheeky but. . . Your Behemoths evolved from Paraceratherium (Indricotherium) The main difficulty is these guys living in the desert. Presumably they roamed the savanah where there was much more food for a large animal. Modern desert animals tend to be small. I propose they do not live full-time in the desert but are migratory. They move from ...


1

After some research, I find that your Chocobo is a Gastornis Gastornis fits in most of your criteria: Herbivore While Gastornis was thought to be a fearful predator just like the phorusrhacid terror birds, it's now believed to be a peaceful herbivore (see this site:https://www.nationalgeographic.com/science/phenomena/2014/02/27/giant-prehistoric-bird-...


5

I'd like to raise your attention towards Plesiosaurs. They lived at around the same time as dinosaurs (200 million years ago). Now, for your question about evolution and such, I'd raise you: sharks. Shark skeletons have not changed much in their millions of years of existence - they're older than TREES! Despite having been around for so long, physically ...


0

It's just a mutant fox The description, more or less, is a fox, except it has multiple tails. A fox with multiple tails is possible through mutation. Multiple limbs is a condition known as 'polymelia', so this would be a fox with extreme polymelia. The extra tails wouldn't work well, and the fox would suffer as a result, but if you want a nine-tailed fox, ...


2

No, not really. Except for the elephant tusks, high intelligence (read: language), shiny stuff gathering, or aquatic life it sounds like a titanoboa https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Titanoboa "Titanoboa (/tiˌtɑːnoʊˈboʊə/) is an extinct genus of very large snakes that lived in what is now La Guajira in northeastern Colombia. They could grow up to 12.8 m (42 ...


4

Titanoboa There's no snake nowadays which is close to 40ft. long, and even the closest one to it, a record held by the reticulated python, isn't fully substantiated. But, if we turn back the clock a good 65 million years, back when everything was bigger, we find a snake very close to the specification in question - the Titanoboa, a literal giant snake. Now, ...


3

It's a hippo. A big black horse-like creature that resides in pools, extremely territorial? Sounds to me like the very rare Celtic hippo. It runs underwater and lives in lake. It would explain the kelpie's kill count too - hippos are extremely dangerous creatures when disturbed. It doesn't eat them but it most certainly drowns anyone who comes near. Mind, ...


5

Possible - it's a pinniped It's not horse-based, that's for sure. For one, horses are vegetarians, so shifting them to a meat-based diet not really so easy. So, if we're looking for a quadruped (or, at least quadruped-like) animal that can live in water, we're looking at a pinniped variant. Pinniped is a family of mammals which primarily include the various ...


2

1. Eggs The bird is extracted in egg form, which it takes some time to hatch from. This time can be used by the extractor to get far away from the bird. 2. Keep your head away Make it so the bird must peck it's beak into the head of the target dreamer. This is not hard for a bird on the loose, but makes it easier for extractors to control them initially. ...


1

Practice. Faith. http://experimentaltheology.blogspot.com/2009/12/snake-handling-churches-of-appalachia.html Your dream extractors are members of a religious sect akin to snake handling religious groups. They consider themselves to be doing God's work and the extractions are the equivalent of casting out devils. It is hard to argue. They practice and ...


3

This depends on which way the "Bird" comes out. If it comes out beak first, staring directly at you, this would be more problematic of course than if it came out sideways or tail first. In the case of sideways or tail first extractions, I don't really see a problem, just look away when needed, and grab the bird when it comes out avoiding grabbing the beak. ...


5

Plesiosaur. It's no stretch to say these guys laid their eggs on the beach like turtles. So they had some slight degree of movement on the land. Over millions of years some of them adapted to like in rivers rather than the ocean, and sometimes crawl between smaller bodies of water. Hence their flipper adapted to be flipper-feet.


1

I think the answer depends on: why is it necessary, for the survival of the young, that the mother burst into flames? If it's not necessary, then it becomes difficult to explain how this species would have ever evolved to do this. If it's necessary simply for the heat given off to make the eggshells crack, similar to pinus contorta (the pine whose seeds ...


3

From a "biological" viewpoint, there are several questions that need to be answered, with the big one being: Why do mother phoenixes immolate themselves to birth their children? Personally, I think this is a rather unlikely evolutionary outcome as almost all avian creatures are born in a rather helpless state and need to be fed/nurtured by parents for a ...


8

There is growing DNA evidence that other species of hominins (close relatives of modern or recent ancestral humans) persisted into the earliest of historical times, at least on Flores Island ("hobbit" fossils have been dated as recently as 4000 years BP). Sumatra is densely enough forested and sparsely enough populated that it isn't much of a stretch to ...


7

Otters already get this big The Giant River Otter of the Amazon reaches up to seven feet in length and is a powerful predator. It’s highly social and lives throughout the Amazon basin. There is nothing astonishing or far fetched about a different species of otter getting this big in a cold climate like ireland, it just needs the right pressure. Perhaps ...


5

Competition favors large bodies, so the easiest solution to your problem is just to make otters bigger, provided the ecosystem can support them. The "evolutionary pressure" making otters large would be the lack of pressure. The abundance of food and lack of competition would allow them to keep getting bigger. While this is the most obvious solution, I don't ...


4

There's not just a problem with capturing the wyverns, but also being able to "break" (AKA domesticate) them. For example, if you capture an adult wild horse, it is incredibly hard (some say it's just impossible) to break them. You need to have a horse from a young age--not necessarily birth, but pretty young, so they bond to you. Normally they start ...


6

Basically grab a Cretaceous-era (or even Jurassic) theropod (dinosaurs that include Trex and all birds) and make them only evolve feathers over half of their body (for all we know there was one like this we just don’t have a well-preserved fossil). Then make them survive (preferably in a smaller form) the mass extinction til your time frame. Here’s a good ...


6

Same as anything. Ropes and nets. Rope and Nets will wrap around their targets, weighing them down and tangling them. They can be safely launched or flung through the air, and don't need to contain sharp pointy parts to latch on. Its just a ton of fibers woven together. Historically, you can look at the Bola, Gladiator nets or thrown fishing nets. Now you ...


8

The fastest bird is a peregrine falcon, which can dive at up to ~200mph (~350km/h). Your dragon will be going nearly 8 times as fast, which means 82=64 times the drag. You're going to need a far more aerodynamic body and a massive amount of thrust. All that drag also gets turned into heat, so it's a good thing dragons are fireproof. However, dragons have a ...


7

DONT steal its eggs and raise them as their own. Or kill the mother first then steal the eggs. You said it yourself they would be great for warfare and once captured depending on if its intelligent it wont do a thing that these tiny humans that it could easily eat says.A Wyvern would take many people to take down under the best circumstances. Trap it ...


0

I answered your previous question about mothman with an owl, and I will answer this with a bat. Along with this the ears have become sort of conical shapes, which resemble horns. there could be little flaps of the ears which still look like the original ears. As said before, Quetzalcoatlus could fly and it was larger. Because of the square cube law it can ...


3

Most of those can work together well enough, except for "can fly" and "somewhat bulky". The bigger your gargoyles are, the more fragile they're likely to be. Powered flight is hard. It is energetically expensive, and as a result requires strong tradeoffs to make the amount of energy required for a particular creature to fly low enough to be attainable. In ...


0

I would like to posit that this Mothman evolved from a bat. If it's white, it's likely adapted to live in snow, so it might be from the Appalachian Mountains nearby. Red eyes, AFAIK, are not uncommon in bats. Bats have wings, and are nocturnal already. As for why this thing is so big, that means it's evolved to hunt larger prey-- like people sized prey. ...


2

Humans. Red eye? - Albinism White skin? - Albinism Nocturnal? - Photosensitivity No neck? - Genetic disorder Everything, apart from wings, are part of being .... With the brows big like moth antennae, spiky ears and long fingers. And they were all based on european nobles who, thanks to generations of inbreeding, produced this outcome in their ...


1

You could also use the ladybug approach. The unicorn is poisonous prey animal and wants to be seen. They develop white fur and glittery manes, put up a good fight, and when eaten, harms the predator. Predators learn that they are unpleasant to be around and avoid herds of them.


5

A big hecking owl. In all seriousness it seems that an owl could fulfill all of these criterion. being seven foot tall could be a bit of a problem for flying, but Quetzalcoatlus the flying reptile was around 18 feet tall. owls are already nocturnal, some have orangeish red eyes, have wings, are sometimes white and do not have obvious necks. it seems that a ...


3

They became arctic predators Perhaps due to increasingly low temperature, or some other phenomena, the Siberian Unicorn's normal sources of nutrition started to die off, forcing them to turn to become omnivorous in order to survive. If we assume they started eating meat as a large part of their diet, then the smaller size, arctic camouflage, and better ...


5

So, what you're describing as a mythical creature is actually very close to a creature that existed some time after the Cretaceous period - Ambulocetus. The sizing is a little off and it is certainly unlikely that it had eye motifs on its skin and it didn't have tusks, but there is a lot that this creature has in common with your sea boar. As such, it's ...


2

Biologists would say that there is proof that cephalopod-like Krakens, as opposed to Krakens with other body shapes, can achieve the dimensions and body masses of the largest known specimens of the giant squid, Architeuthis, and the colossal squid, Mesonychoteuthis hamiltoni, and there is no evidence about the probability that cephalopods might get any ...


2

Horses evolved to run. For a rhino to take on more horse-like proportions would probably require evolutionary pressure toward speed. Maybe a very agile predator that was good at getting behind the horn. Or a pack hunter, where if the rhino holds one off with the horn, two others strike its back. This might also force improved eyesight and snowy ...


8

They could have evolved white fur coat if they had moved to a snowy climate, as to blend in with the snow. They also might evolve hooves because, like horses, having just one toe reduced the weight they had to carry at the end of each leg, making it easier for them to run and maneuver. Evolving similarly to mountain goats could produce some cool traits. -...


6

No more than 30 meters, at a guess, but probably fewer Evolution pressure is pretty easy - same reason anything wants to get bigger. In the case of a kraken, it's to grow big enough so that it can't be eaten by it's main predator - the sperm whale, largest of the toothed whales. As far as diet, actually it can eat the same diet as it's smaller brethren and ...


32

Completely Plausible Evolution has shaped the odd-toed ungulates into incredibly diverse forms, consider how different the ancient ancestors of the horse were, or how diverse the rhinoceros family was in the Eocene. Every trait you gave for the Elasmothere descendant is rather straightforward, the fur can change due to environment or sexual selection, ...


5

The harvesting and selling of a humaniod by-products sounds like it would fall under the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service(APHIS). More specifically The Lacy Act which, "regulates the trade of wildlife and plants and creates penalties for violations." While The Lacy Act doesn't cover bi-product distribution and ...


1

I found something that might be useful. It would be the Navajo Folklore or Mythology. You might have to do some dig some for more details, but a great bit of information can be found here at Sacred-texts website The Navajo are a large tribe of Native Americans that come from New Mexico and Arizona. They have a pretty complicated mythology, but there are ...


3

Honestly, a lot of creatures in various Native American traditions show similarities to the fair folk. As this page mentions a lot of beings that are often described as monsters, giants or spirits in anthropological texts and anthologies of folklore show more similarities to the fair folk than actual monsters or spirits, and only got classified as such due ...


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