New answers tagged

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Towing is the most comfortable way for both parties but lacks the simplicity of the missionary pose, nothing else needed just to lose your shyness... Any way.. the most efficient way is to surf on a mermaid.


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Missionary position. source Benefits 1: I can breathe. 2: She swims just as well upside-down 3: She does not need her arms to swim. 4: Less drag from me because I am in the air. 5: View is better, in a couple of respects.


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The main things you need to contend with are Drag from the water, humans needing air, and hindering of the Mermaids mobility. If we use the human comparison that was brought up in the previous post, the Rickshaw, then I would imagine something almost like a kite, or some sort of raft being towed by the Mermaid. Rickshaw riders don't give piggybacks because ...


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Since your airship isn't relying on power to remain aloft the energy requirements are not only greatly reduced but the energy density of your storage becomes essentially irrelevant. You could stick a ton (or several tons) of lead acid batteries on your airship and still get it in the air if the envelope volume is large enough. Of course bigger is slower, and ...


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There is a legitimate case for electrically-powered airships: Unlike heavier-than-air aircraft, airship range does not significantly increase as fuel mass decreases. Yes, a fuel-powered airship that's almost empty would be slightly more agile and faster compared to its full state, but due to the inevitably poor aerodynamics of such a craft, it wouldn't be ...


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Sailplanes are much, much more influenced by the form of their outer shell than be 20kg more or less payload. A 4 feet goblin would weight as much as many female pilots today... ok maybe even a little less. The thing is that the plane itself, if it is lightweight and uses wings from today, will be able to carry a goblin or three or a man, it wouldn't make a ...


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Assuming mechanical perfection staying power is probably going to be more important than power-to-weight ratio; humans have incredible stamina, our ancestors used to run prey to death over many miles, sometimes continuing to hound horses and antelope over a period of days until they dropped dead from exhaustion. Goblins are usually depicted as having a high ...


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Exploring an Robot World Humanity has discovered a planet that was once completely overtaken by sapient robots, but is now long extinct. All organic life was replaced with machines. Robots here had a culture and history all of their own. An electrical engineer and anthropologist would need to work together pretty closely to learn things about the robot ...


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Investigating an ancient and now (presumed!) dead civilization that uploaded their minds to an unimaginably large and complicated computing device of some kind, and thus "transcended". (Kicker: Civilization isn't dead at all! Device is still operating, at a very slow rate consuming little power, but just active enough to notice the interference of ...


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Digital Archaeology / Digital Forensics Essentially, the type of work done at the Computer History Museum when they are working on restoring vintage computers to working condition or trying to reconstruct old technology. The actual process consists of a complex combination of classic investigation to find original documentation as well as some of the type of ...


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Interplanetary Hospital/Emergency Room They work together at a hospital where multiple species come for treatment. An anthropologist is need to understand various cultures and religions, and quickly, so that treatments don't violate the patients' unique beliefs. Which could lead to lawsuits or war, depending on the culture. And for the other side, for an ...


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Assuming that you want both characters to actually practice their professions (which is rather unusual in the modern world, where most university graduates work like general-purpose knowledge workers), the most common environment to require both an electronist and an anthropologist would be user interface design / user testing of some new appliance. (That is,...


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Imaging technology. Anthropology and archaeology have been augmented in recent years by nondestructive noninvasive imaging techniques. One of the coolest is backscatter muography. Scientists used an unprecedented imaging technique called muography to create an internal scan of the Great Pyramid of Giza. See how it works. Muography is the process of ...


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Brave New World (of tech): There are some great answers already, so this is really more a supplement. All my answers envision a future with either "primitive" aliens or culturally backwards humans (depending on the background of your universe) being introduced to new tech. which works best depends on the flavor you are going for in your setting. ...


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As L. Dutch pointed out, many people don't quite work in the field they studied. But assuming you want them both soon after graduation, doing what they graduated in ... The electronics engineer builds prototypes for some new gizmo, the anthropologist tries to understand how it will be used. Think of something like the first smartwatches. Some guy says with ...


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Modern day foreign aid Anthropology is the study of aspects of humans within past and present societies From Wikipedia. Note the "present", it can be used to add understanding of an unusual culture, but still in the present day. I can see a modern government offering assistance with electrification to some isolated community, and the ...


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Am I missing something obvious? I guess you have a somehow wrong impression of the work environment. Although Worldbuilding is ruled by XKCD, let me introduce you to Dilbert. Contrary to common believe, not all mathematicians or physicists end up working in blue lighted fancy laboratories and not all humanities graduate end up teaching to snotty kids in ...


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Depends how long do you need to orient the weapon on the ship to damage it. If you need the beam to hold for a long time (>1sec), or your using railguns: I'd be looking at the accuracy of surveying tools like Theodolites. Here's one on eBay than can do 10 seconds of angular accuracy. That's (10 / 60 / 60)'th of a degree. 0.00277778 degrees. That's about ...


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More accurate than you might think possible Let's look at a surprising science: photography. When doing photography of objects that are distant, low light or both you need to have a longer exposure to make the image bright and detailed enough. But anyone these days can tell you that making a picture in a dark room is difficult. You need a steady hand as well....


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Ornithopter. The half-horse features would provide an average of 1HP(746). Far higher than a cyclist that gives 300w. That means you can make them excellent Commandoes! Propelling silent ornithopters that move in the night, deadly ambushes behind enemy lines!


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It (joke aside (yet not too far)) may have looked like this, allowing the centaur to step in and out easily. More seriously, as mentioned in other answers, centaur must have comfortable position allowing to withstand g forces, something like this could take place inside the cockpit: (source)


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I am just "putting my two cents in" here: But do you know the actor Fess Parker of the good old times tv show Daniel Boone (one of my favorite tv shows ever) was turned down by USAAF because he was too tall at 6 feet 6 inches (1.98 m)? https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fess_Parker He enlisted in the U.S. Navy in the latter part of World War II,[6][7] ...


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Because the protagonist can use heat magic, she can utilize air pressure to accelerate the bullet, making gunpowder unnecessary. To survive in this magical world, the protagonist would need a deep understanding of physics and engineering to make an effective air rifle out of simple tools, as the most complex part of the rifle is the air release mechanism, ...


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Consider if the Centaur-flying inspiration might go in a very different direction than biplanes. They're already most of the way towards having the form of a Pegasus, anyway (which perhaps also exists in the world with other fantasy races such as Centaurs?). Instead of looking at the Centaur body as a handicap, instead see how it might be an advantage; the ...


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I don't know how much centaurs weigh, so I just did all of the following using a hypothetical "average horse". I think it's funnier to think of horses flying planes anyway. So, just thought I would add some numbers to spruce things up. The common German fighter during WWI was the Albatros. It's empty take-off weight was 659kg and its maximum take-...


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Here are three things to address: Bullet making Metallurgy Rifling Bullets Cartridge bullets are metal casings with everything needed to propel the lead forward inside. This requires a skill in miniaturization and the machinery to do it. If she is able to build the machinery, she could get rich by building similar machines for other product makers...she ...


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Your magic system, as described, would remove many of the traditional roadblocks to advanced metallurgy (removing impurities and adding alloying elements). This would bypass many of your initial issues, even with the inputs limited to magically fabricated metals. The same can be said for chemical synthesis required for smokeless propellants (traditional ...


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Smokeless powders began to be developed in the 1860s (see https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Smokeless_powder), a product of the newly-developing chemical industry. Here's an example: In 1884, Paul Vieille invented a smokeless powder called Poudre B (short for poudre blanche—white powder, as distinguished from black powder) made from 68.2% insoluble ...


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The most difficult part of building a firearm with all its accoutrements completely from scratch, regardless of the time-period or tools you have available, is the ammunition. Even today, nobody except the most die-hard performance shooters would even consider making their own cartridges because machining individual brass casings on a lathe is a monumental ...


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Alas, not in 1918. But for WWII they'd take Flying Fortress to a whole new level So there's been some great answers here, but few seem to truly appreciate the fact that flight was NEW in WWI, and subsequently the aircraft were not great. Planes were so primitive that nobody actually knew what they were doing, even in 1918. To the point where there were no ...


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Why not use some other sylvan race as pilots? Centaurs usually live in sylvan forests, close to pixies and suchlike. Among them should be ideal candidates for flight. Centaurs can be ground personnel where their strength and speed will really shine. Imagine mechanics with a built in 15 HP engine for moving equipment. Some ideas: find some warlike tiny ...


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"It's the Great War, and all the nations are having a good time of it, painting their biplanes flashy colours, as they shoot into their own propellers! But over in the corner, lonesome and dejected, the centaur nations had no planes at all.... They can't fly anywhere, they don't get to put on goggles or get set on fire while simultaneously suffocating. ...


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Lung capacity of a centaur might help in doing strenuous work at altitude, but there are two biophysical limits that cannot be overcome by just increasing lung capacity. Lungs are basically a semi-permeable membrane that allows gases to pass through. Oxygen moves from air to blood because the partial pressure of oxygen (ppO2) dissolved in the blood in the ...


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A lot has been covered in other answers, so I just want to add two specific points to consider: Because centaurs are so much more massive, it will take a few years longer to develop the first planes that can carry them as pilots. A centaur-only world wouldn't invent planes as soon because it's a harder problem for bigger passengers and pilots. I think it ...


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Being half-humans, centaurs really can drive planes: arms for the steering wheel, front legs for the pedals. And as you mentioned, there is an additional benefit having two more legs so they can be used for something good (extra flight controls, actuation of machineguns and cannons...). Counter-side: horses are 3-5 times heavier thus we need more "horse ...


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Why would you need an engine when the pilot is an engine with a peak power of about 15 hp? Thats right. Although we call it horsepower, a horse has about 15 hp (peak performance). So going into another direction than retrofitting a plane which was designed for weak humans, we could design a plane that uses the centaurs muscle energy to create lift. I'm ...


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Yes, it would be possible to build a plane that a centaur could fly using WWI technology, but the centaurs would still be at a severe disadvantage because they would need to build very big and non-maneuverable planes to accommodate their larger and heavier bodies. Now, WWI was the first war where actual air-battles took place and where aircraft played a ...


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They actually existed Below is a picture and specifications of a Centaur 2A, built in 1919. The photo doesn't show the centaur pilot. I'll see if I can find one. Edit - Found! diagram added at end Note that the centaur's head and shoulders stuck out of the fuselage where you can see a dip near the front in the picture. It would look like an ordinary pilot ...


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I want to highlight the opposite approach to IronEagle rather than leave it as a comment. The safest posture for your Centaurs in a plan is to be laying down. This avoids having to stand when pulling Gs providing the same benefit as sitting for a human pilot. This does obviously mean they'll be restricted to hand controls only. So your Centaur is going to ...


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Don't let the neighsayers and badgers keep you from your dreams of flight. Have you ever thought about a... Flintstones Plane You read that right. I attached a picture of the Flintstones car above for reference, should you happen to not have watched that cartoon before. My proposal is for the bottom of the plane to have four portholes for the centaurs to ...


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You definitely could. However, I have thought of a few additional concerns: How do you strap in?: Human pilots preferentially sit in a chair, and can easily be belted in. How do you strap in a centaur? Do they have to straddle some kind of saddle, and then tie in straps over their back? Can they strap themselves in, or do they need someone else to do so? ...


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Starting from point 3 As far as I can work out, there'd no benefit to having a centaur pilot as opposed to a human one. Their physical strength and speed are no advantage to them, but rather are detriments. But... then again Though... maybe you could extrapolate some advantage in that centaurs/horses have larger lungs and bigger hearts (and possibly two ...


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Tabby concrete. https://www.tabbyruins.com/blog/thomson-tabby-house I have been learning about tabby! Tabby is a type of concrete which was widely used in the pre-Civil war American Southeast. The ingredients are sand, water, shells and lime (calcium oxide), with the lime produced by crushing and burning more shells (which are calcium carbonate). The ...


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With our current level of technology, it seems unlikely. That's because the energy to change Earth's orbit in any significant way is much greater than the combined energy output of all countries. According to Inside Energy, the world used 575 quadrillion Btu in 2015. That's roughly 5.75 $\times$ 1018 joules. The Earth has a mass of 6 $\times$ 1024 kg, so if ...


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For any body moving in space, changing its orbit requires being able to exert a force on it. In the same way as a space rocket executes well calculated maneuvers to change its orbit, the same would need to happen in this case. The problem is that, at the moment, we have no technology to exert any appreciable force on a body the mass of Earth. We "...


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