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0

I would go with a large suspended sphere in the centre of the ship. this sphere would contain all of the crew and hallways etc, and would always orientate itself so that the bottom of the hallways was where the g force was being applied towards. this would keep everything upright and good.


1

I think octagon with rope in the center and alternating half walls might work. A perfectly round, cylinder shape might be hard to get a good foothold, but octagon might be better, because flat land to put feet on. The rope would let them climb up against gravity prehaps using a ascender type gadget or slide down, i also thought about fire poles, one going ...


2

So a lot of answers focus specifically on the hallways, and of them, cylindrical passages do make the most sense when considering the orientations that gravity would have on them. They would probably be slightly narrower in radius to prevent out of control bounces following multiple gravity shifts. The hallways would can have moving rails that help move the ...


2

Hallways are tiny, and padded. Each hallway is barely big enough for one person to squeeze along, rubbing arms on the walls as she does. These walls are padded. If a maneuver unexpectedly throws her against the wall she will not accelerate far before the wall stops her - she is already against the wall. Really it would seem like the wall suddenly leaned ...


18

For one thing, hand holds do no good under high G. I can imagine the person flying down the corridor and going splat against a far wall, followed shortly by his fingers. I would have very short sections of hall. The farther you can travel the faster you're going when you hit. Since zigzags would make moving cargo a hideous experience and would really ...


11

One single cylindrical corridor that spirals the length of the ship. When you're accelerating it's a spiral ramp upwards/downwards When you're rotating then it's "level" (and long) When you're tumbling end over end down is at least meaningful most of the time (though you may have some issues near the centre of rotation). I will admit that I haven't ...


3

The SF classic "The Mote in God's Eye" describes some of the interiors of Imperial Navy spacecraft. They rotate about the long axis for spin gravity when not under thrust. The ship could be imagined as a skyscraper or office tower when the engine is running, and a rotisserie when not. The ship then basically had fittings to move equipment and dog it down on ...


5

Have the ship designed as one sphere inside another one. When acceleration was applied to the outer sphere strong electro magnets and induction motors on the inner surfaces would rotate the inner sphere in such a way that the accelerating force was always coming from the same direction for the inner sphere.


11

Forget ergonomic hallway design. Just use Electro-Magnets All of the interior surfaces within the ship, including all four walls of every hallway are made of magnetically attractable metals. All objects within the ship which are not permanently mounted to a fixed point in the ship, are skinned in a ferrous metal foil. All crew members are required to ...


2

I would like to suggest the low-tech solution of utilising the skin plant-growths on the animal itself to weave a sort of harness or net/basket, while preserving the physical attachment to the animal. This method uses minimal material and also enables a variety of option of riding in a saddle, a mounted platform or while being towed. I think it also allows ...


2

The experiment has been tried successfully at least once and is in the literature. Chap called Jonah traveled for a while inside a fish. The details are vague but we must assume that he dined on the fishes innards since he didn't take provisions and got his oxygen from air pockets or gas filled bladders.


5

If humans ride it strictly on the surface, a saddle-like seat made out of vines is a good anti-slip material for the rider. The contraption is a belt which wraps around the body like a belt, with loops into which the dorsal fin and side fins can fit. This will hold the seat in place and prevent it from sagging and turning. (Yes, fish skin is very slippery). ...


41

Water is 1000x denser than air, and much more viscous. So saddling fish only works if you are going to be riding on the surface. That's on top of the fish having a shape that allows for saddling. If you are going to be underwater, you'd better be horizontal and grab the animal by some means. If they have shark skin, you might be able to hold on to them (you'...


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